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Re: [TalkAntietam] Nicodemus Hotel

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  • Thomas Clemens
    Sorry Tom, too many things on my mind today. It is Springvale not Fountaindale. Thomas G. Clemens D.A. Professor of History Hagerstown Community College
    Message 1 of 14 , Feb 16, 2009
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      Sorry Tom, too many things on my mind today. It is "Springvale" not "Fountaindale."


      Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
      Professor of History
      Hagerstown Community College


      >>> "Thomas Clemens" <clemenst@...> 02/16/09 1:02 PM >>>
      Tom Shay,
      That is the house for the Nicodemus Mill, for which Nicodemus Mill Road is named. Theroad intersects Dogstreet Road at a place called Fountaindale, where the Twelfth Corps was bivouaced before being ordered to support Hooker. It is about a mile or more from Keedysville.

      Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
      Professor of History
      Hagerstown Community College


      >>> "RoteBaron" <RoteBaron@...> 02/15/09 10:27 PM >>>
      Stephen,

      While this may not be what you seek, here is a link for Nicodemus Mill Complex:

      http://www.marylandhistoricaltrust.net/nr/NRDetail.aspx?HDID=1275&COUNTY=Washington&FROM=NRCountyList.aspx?COUNTY=Washington

      Tom Shay


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Stephen Recker
      To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Saturday, February 14, 2009 9:20 AM
      Subject: Re: [TalkAntietam] Nicodemus Hotel


      Guess that would be near A.A. Bigg's house, or that bank. Thanks.

      I was actually hoping it was a brick building. I'm looking for a brick
      hotel called "Nicodemus Mills". Guess that's not it. Thanks anyway.

      Stephen

      On Friday, February 13, 2009, at 10:34 PM, RoteBaron wrote:

      > Stephen, perhaps this is a reference to same place?
      >
      > From "A WALKING TOUR OF SHARPSBURG" booklet (1996):
      >
      > 112 West Main: The first store in Sharpsburg was kept in the white
      > portion of this house by David R. Miller (circa 1768). His son,
      > Colonel John Miller, also resided here. He fought at the Battle of
      > Bladensburg in the War of 1812, and was the owner of many slaves. In
      > the 1930's, this large 18th century log building was a "Room and
      > Board" known as "The Nicodemus House".
      >
      > Tom Shay

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