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re Battle of Antietam episode on History International

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  • G E Mayers
    Gang, At different times today History International will be showing the Antietam episode of the series Ten Days that Changed America . Yr. Obt. Svt. G E
    Message 1 of 14 , Feb 12, 2009
      Gang,

      At different times today History International will be showing
      the Antietam episode of the series "Ten Days that Changed
      America".

      Yr. Obt. Svt.
      G E "Gerry" Mayers

      To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even
      on one's mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the
      Union, a passport to any foreign country, and a benediction from
      the Almighty God. --Anonymous
    • Stephen Recker
      I m trying to date a photo: http://www.virtualgettysburg.com/dan/transfer/mcgrawHotel.jpg The History of Sharpsburg lists the McGraw Hotel in Sharpsburg
      Message 2 of 14 , Feb 12, 2009
        I'm trying to date a photo:

        http://www.virtualgettysburg.com/dan/transfer/mcgrawHotel.jpg

        The History of Sharpsburg lists the McGraw Hotel in 'Sharpsburg
        Businesses 1900 to 1920' and has the City Hotel there in 1908. Anyone
        have any clues? Thanks.

        Stephen
      • Thomas Clemens
        Steve, Jeff Stauffer calls his house the McGraw/Shea House and mentions it was a hotel. His house, on the NE corner of the square, opposite the the old
        Message 3 of 14 , Feb 12, 2009
          Steve,
          Jeff Stauffer calls his house the McGraw/Shea House and mentions it was a hotel. His house, on the NE corner of the square, opposite the the old funeral home, has been much modifed over the years, but it looks like it could be this building in the photo. Just my off-the-cuff guess.


          Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
          Professor of History
          Hagerstown Community College


          >>> Stephen Recker <recker@...> 02/12/09 9:35 PM >>>
          I'm trying to date a photo:

          http://www.virtualgettysburg.com/dan/transfer/mcgrawHotel.jpg

          The History of Sharpsburg lists the McGraw Hotel in 'Sharpsburg
          Businesses 1900 to 1920' and has the City Hotel there in 1908. Anyone
          have any clues? Thanks.

          Stephen
        • Thomas Clemens
          Not to contradict myself, but on second look it could be O. T. Reilly s house too. Looks a lot like it. Thomas G. Clemens D.A. Professor of History Hagerstown
          Message 4 of 14 , Feb 12, 2009
            Not to contradict myself, but on second look it could be O. T. Reilly's house too. Looks a lot like it.

            Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
            Professor of History
            Hagerstown Community College


            >>> Stephen Recker <recker@...> 02/12/09 9:35 PM >>>
            I'm trying to date a photo:

            http://www.virtualgettysburg.com/dan/transfer/mcgrawHotel.jpg

            The History of Sharpsburg lists the McGraw Hotel in 'Sharpsburg
            Businesses 1900 to 1920' and has the City Hotel there in 1908. Anyone
            have any clues? Thanks.

            Stephen
          • Stephen Recker
            Tom, Thanks for the note. That is definitely O.T. s stone house sticking out there, but the sign is hanging from the tree in front of the hotel, it s not in
            Message 5 of 14 , Feb 13, 2009
              Tom,

              Thanks for the note.

              That is definitely O.T.'s stone house sticking out there, but the sign
              is hanging from the tree in front of the hotel, it's not in his window.
              At first I thought the McGraw's sign was in O.T.'s window, which would
              mean that, since O.T. started renting the place in 1891, the photo
              would have to pre-date then. On closer examination, though, I noted
              that McGraw's Hotel also has a sign on the door and that the big sign
              was hanging from the tree. That makes more sense because I don't think
              O.T.'s place had been a hotel or owned by McGraw.

              Stephen




              On Thursday, February 12, 2009, at 10:34 PM, Thomas Clemens wrote:

              > Not to contradict myself, but on second look it could be O. T.
              > Reilly's house too. Looks a lot like it.
              >
              > Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
              > Professor of History
              > Hagerstown Community College


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Thomas Clemens
              OK, then it makess sense that it is Jeff Stauffer s place on the corner. I thought it was in O.T. s window. Thomas G. Clemens D.A. Professor of History
              Message 6 of 14 , Feb 13, 2009
                OK, then it makess sense that it is Jeff Stauffer's place on the corner. I thought it was in O.T.'s window.

                Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
                Professor of History
                Hagerstown Community College


                >>> Stephen Recker <recker@...> 02/13/09 5:19 AM >>>
                Tom,

                Thanks for the note.

                That is definitely O.T.'s stone house sticking out there, but the sign
                is hanging from the tree in front of the hotel, it's not in his window.
                At first I thought the McGraw's sign was in O.T.'s window, which would
                mean that, since O.T. started renting the place in 1891, the photo
                would have to pre-date then. On closer examination, though, I noted
                that McGraw's Hotel also has a sign on the door and that the big sign
                was hanging from the tree. That makes more sense because I don't think
                O.T.'s place had been a hotel or owned by McGraw.

                Stephen




                On Thursday, February 12, 2009, at 10:34 PM, Thomas Clemens wrote:

                > Not to contradict myself, but on second look it could be O. T.
                > Reilly's house too. Looks a lot like it.
                >
                > Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
                > Professor of History
                > Hagerstown Community College


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Stephen Recker
                In John Schildt s Drums Along the Antietam , he talks about the Nicodemus Hotel. Does anyone know where that was/is? Thanks. Stephen
                Message 7 of 14 , Feb 13, 2009
                  In John Schildt's 'Drums Along the Antietam', he talks about the
                  Nicodemus Hotel. Does anyone know where that was/is? Thanks.

                  Stephen
                • RoteBaron
                  From A WALKING TOUR OF SHARPSBURG booklet (1996): 103-105 East Main: The brick house was known as the McGraw Hotel at the time of the battle. The Hotel s
                  Message 8 of 14 , Feb 13, 2009
                    From "A WALKING TOUR OF SHARPSBURG" booklet (1996):

                    103-105 East Main: The brick house was known as the McGraw Hotel at the time of the battle. The Hotel's tavern was popular with the soldiers who passed through the town. Whiskey sold for $5.00 a canteen. The building later housed a beauty shop, a green-grocer and is presently an apartment house.

                    101 East Main: The Shay House was also a tavern and hotel in the mid-1800's. The structure later became an antique shop and Civil War museum owned then by the Remsburgs.

                    Tom Shay

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • RoteBaron
                    Stephen, perhaps this is a reference to same place? From A WALKING TOUR OF SHARPSBURG booklet (1996): 112 West Main: The first store in Sharpsburg was kept
                    Message 9 of 14 , Feb 13, 2009
                      Stephen, perhaps this is a reference to same place?

                      From "A WALKING TOUR OF SHARPSBURG" booklet (1996):

                      112 West Main: The first store in Sharpsburg was kept in the white portion of this house by David R. Miller (circa 1768). His son, Colonel John Miller, also resided here. He fought at the Battle of Bladensburg in the War of 1812, and was the owner of many slaves. In the 1930's, this large 18th century log building was a "Room and Board" known as "The Nicodemus House".

                      Tom Shay


                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: Stephen Recker
                      To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Friday, February 13, 2009 9:55 PM
                      Subject: [TalkAntietam] Nicodemus Hotel


                      In John Schildt's 'Drums Along the Antietam', he talks about the
                      Nicodemus Hotel. Does anyone know where that was/is? Thanks.

                      Stephen





                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Stephen Recker
                      Tom, Thanks. This explains both hotels. Interesting. Stephen ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      Message 10 of 14 , Feb 14, 2009
                        Tom,

                        Thanks. This explains both hotels. Interesting.

                        Stephen

                        On Friday, February 13, 2009, at 10:24 PM, RoteBaron wrote:

                        > From "A WALKING TOUR OF SHARPSBURG" booklet (1996):
                        >
                        > 103-105 East Main: The brick house was known as the McGraw Hotel at
                        > the time of the battle. The Hotel's tavern was popular with the
                        > soldiers who passed through the town. Whiskey sold for $5.00 a
                        > canteen. The building later housed a beauty shop, a green-grocer and
                        > is presently an apartment house.
                        >
                        > 101 East Main: The Shay House was also a tavern and hotel in the
                        > mid-1800's. The structure later became an antique shop and Civil War
                        > museum owned then by the Remsburgs.
                        >
                        > Tom Shay


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Stephen Recker
                        Guess that would be near A.A. Bigg s house, or that bank. Thanks. I was actually hoping it was a brick building. I m looking for a brick hotel called
                        Message 11 of 14 , Feb 14, 2009
                          Guess that would be near A.A. Bigg's house, or that bank. Thanks.

                          I was actually hoping it was a brick building. I'm looking for a brick
                          hotel called "Nicodemus Mills". Guess that's not it. Thanks anyway.

                          Stephen

                          On Friday, February 13, 2009, at 10:34 PM, RoteBaron wrote:

                          > Stephen, perhaps this is a reference to same place?
                          >
                          > From "A WALKING TOUR OF SHARPSBURG" booklet (1996):
                          >
                          > 112 West Main: The first store in Sharpsburg was kept in the white
                          > portion of this house by David R. Miller (circa 1768). His son,
                          > Colonel John Miller, also resided here. He fought at the Battle of
                          > Bladensburg in the War of 1812, and was the owner of many slaves. In
                          > the 1930's, this large 18th century log building was a "Room and
                          > Board" known as "The Nicodemus House".
                          >
                          > Tom Shay


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • RoteBaron
                          Stephen, While this may not be what you seek, here is a link for Nicodemus Mill Complex:
                          Message 12 of 14 , Feb 15, 2009
                            Stephen,

                            While this may not be what you seek, here is a link for Nicodemus Mill Complex:

                            http://www.marylandhistoricaltrust.net/nr/NRDetail.aspx?HDID=1275&COUNTY=Washington&FROM=NRCountyList.aspx?COUNTY=Washington

                            Tom Shay


                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: Stephen Recker
                            To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Saturday, February 14, 2009 9:20 AM
                            Subject: Re: [TalkAntietam] Nicodemus Hotel


                            Guess that would be near A.A. Bigg's house, or that bank. Thanks.

                            I was actually hoping it was a brick building. I'm looking for a brick
                            hotel called "Nicodemus Mills". Guess that's not it. Thanks anyway.

                            Stephen

                            On Friday, February 13, 2009, at 10:34 PM, RoteBaron wrote:

                            > Stephen, perhaps this is a reference to same place?
                            >
                            > From "A WALKING TOUR OF SHARPSBURG" booklet (1996):
                            >
                            > 112 West Main: The first store in Sharpsburg was kept in the white
                            > portion of this house by David R. Miller (circa 1768). His son,
                            > Colonel John Miller, also resided here. He fought at the Battle of
                            > Bladensburg in the War of 1812, and was the owner of many slaves. In
                            > the 1930's, this large 18th century log building was a "Room and
                            > Board" known as "The Nicodemus House".
                            >
                            > Tom Shay

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Thomas Clemens
                            Tom Shay, That is the house for the Nicodemus Mill, for which Nicodemus Mill Road is named. Theroad intersects Dogstreet Road at a place called Fountaindale,
                            Message 13 of 14 , Feb 16, 2009
                              Tom Shay,
                              That is the house for the Nicodemus Mill, for which Nicodemus Mill Road is named. Theroad intersects Dogstreet Road at a place called Fountaindale, where the Twelfth Corps was bivouaced before being ordered to support Hooker. It is about a mile or more from Keedysville.

                              Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
                              Professor of History
                              Hagerstown Community College


                              >>> "RoteBaron" <RoteBaron@...> 02/15/09 10:27 PM >>>
                              Stephen,

                              While this may not be what you seek, here is a link for Nicodemus Mill Complex:

                              http://www.marylandhistoricaltrust.net/nr/NRDetail.aspx?HDID=1275&COUNTY=Washington&FROM=NRCountyList.aspx?COUNTY=Washington

                              Tom Shay


                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: Stephen Recker
                              To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Saturday, February 14, 2009 9:20 AM
                              Subject: Re: [TalkAntietam] Nicodemus Hotel


                              Guess that would be near A.A. Bigg's house, or that bank. Thanks.

                              I was actually hoping it was a brick building. I'm looking for a brick
                              hotel called "Nicodemus Mills". Guess that's not it. Thanks anyway.

                              Stephen

                              On Friday, February 13, 2009, at 10:34 PM, RoteBaron wrote:

                              > Stephen, perhaps this is a reference to same place?
                              >
                              > From "A WALKING TOUR OF SHARPSBURG" booklet (1996):
                              >
                              > 112 West Main: The first store in Sharpsburg was kept in the white
                              > portion of this house by David R. Miller (circa 1768). His son,
                              > Colonel John Miller, also resided here. He fought at the Battle of
                              > Bladensburg in the War of 1812, and was the owner of many slaves. In
                              > the 1930's, this large 18th century log building was a "Room and
                              > Board" known as "The Nicodemus House".
                              >
                              > Tom Shay

                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Thomas Clemens
                              Sorry Tom, too many things on my mind today. It is Springvale not Fountaindale. Thomas G. Clemens D.A. Professor of History Hagerstown Community College
                              Message 14 of 14 , Feb 16, 2009
                                Sorry Tom, too many things on my mind today. It is "Springvale" not "Fountaindale."


                                Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
                                Professor of History
                                Hagerstown Community College


                                >>> "Thomas Clemens" <clemenst@...> 02/16/09 1:02 PM >>>
                                Tom Shay,
                                That is the house for the Nicodemus Mill, for which Nicodemus Mill Road is named. Theroad intersects Dogstreet Road at a place called Fountaindale, where the Twelfth Corps was bivouaced before being ordered to support Hooker. It is about a mile or more from Keedysville.

                                Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
                                Professor of History
                                Hagerstown Community College


                                >>> "RoteBaron" <RoteBaron@...> 02/15/09 10:27 PM >>>
                                Stephen,

                                While this may not be what you seek, here is a link for Nicodemus Mill Complex:

                                http://www.marylandhistoricaltrust.net/nr/NRDetail.aspx?HDID=1275&COUNTY=Washington&FROM=NRCountyList.aspx?COUNTY=Washington

                                Tom Shay


                                ----- Original Message -----
                                From: Stephen Recker
                                To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Saturday, February 14, 2009 9:20 AM
                                Subject: Re: [TalkAntietam] Nicodemus Hotel


                                Guess that would be near A.A. Bigg's house, or that bank. Thanks.

                                I was actually hoping it was a brick building. I'm looking for a brick
                                hotel called "Nicodemus Mills". Guess that's not it. Thanks anyway.

                                Stephen

                                On Friday, February 13, 2009, at 10:34 PM, RoteBaron wrote:

                                > Stephen, perhaps this is a reference to same place?
                                >
                                > From "A WALKING TOUR OF SHARPSBURG" booklet (1996):
                                >
                                > 112 West Main: The first store in Sharpsburg was kept in the white
                                > portion of this house by David R. Miller (circa 1768). His son,
                                > Colonel John Miller, also resided here. He fought at the Battle of
                                > Bladensburg in the War of 1812, and was the owner of many slaves. In
                                > the 1930's, this large 18th century log building was a "Room and
                                > Board" known as "The Nicodemus House".
                                >
                                > Tom Shay

                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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