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Uniforms of the US Regulars at Antietam

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  • Rob & Patti Erickson
    Esteemed memebers, what uniform would have been worn by the US Regulars at Antietam? Would the infantry have worn frock coats and Hardee hats, sack coats and
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 3, 2008
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      Esteemed memebers, what uniform would have been worn by the US Regulars
      at Antietam?

      Would the infantry have worn frock coats and Hardee hats, sack coats
      and forage caps, or a combination of styles/equipment?

      Thanks in advance for any information. Rob Erickson
    • G E Mayers
      Dear Rob, Since the Regulars would have been that part of the United States Army governed more by the Rules and Regulations of the Armies of the United States
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 3, 2008
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        Dear Rob,

        Since the Regulars would have been that part of the United States
        Army governed more by the Rules and Regulations of the Armies of
        the United States in force at the time, the following is per the
        "Regulations" *1863 revision but still would have been pretty
        much the same uniforming).

        It is a "very" long excerpt so please bear with me here::

        ARTICLE LI.
        Uniform, Dress and Horse Eqiupments.

        COAT
        For Commissioned Officers.
        1470. All officers shall wear a frock-coat of dark blue
        cloth, the skirt to extend from two-thirds to three-fourths of
        the distance from the top of the hip to the bend of the knee;
        single-breasted for Captains and Lieutenants; double-breasted for
        all other grades.
        1471. For a Major-General-two rows of buttons on the breast,
        nine in each row, placed by threes; the distance between each
        row, five and one-half inches at top, and three and one-half
        inches at bottom; standup collar, to rise no higher than to
        permit the chin to turn freely over it, to hook in front at the
        bottom, and slope thence up and backward at an angle of thirty
        degrees on each side; cuffs two and one-half inches deep to go
        around the sleeves parallel with the lower edge, and to button
        with three small buttons at the under seam; pockets in the folds
        of the skirts, with one button at the hip, and one at the end of
        each pocket, making four buttons on the back and skirt of the
        coat, the hip button to range with the lowest buttons on the
        breast; collar and cuffs to be of dark blue velvet; lining of the
        coat black.
        1472. For a Brigadier-General-the same as for a
        Major-General, except that there will be only eight buttons in
        each row on the breast, placed in pairs.
        1473. For a Colonel-the same as for a Major-General, except
        that there will be only seven buttons in each row on the breast,
        placed at[463] equal distances; collar and cuffs of the same
        color and material as the coat.
        1474. For a Lieutenant-Colonel-the same as for a Colonel.
        1475. For a Major-the same as for a Colonel.
        1476. For a Captain-the same as for a Colonel, except that
        there will be only one row of nine buttons on the breast, placed
        at equal distances.
        1477. For a First Lieutenant-the same as for a Captain.
        1478. For a Second Lieutenant-the same as for a Captain.
        1479. For a Brevet Second Lieutenant-the same as for a
        Captain.
        1480. For a Medical Cadet-the same as for a Brevet Second
        Lieutenant.
        1481. A round jacket, according to pattern, of dark blue
        cloth, trimmed with scarlet, with the Russian shoulder-knot, the
        prescribed insignia of rank to be worked in silver in the centre
        of the knot, may be worn on undress duty by officers of Light
        Artillery.

        For Enlisted Men.
        1482. The uniform coat for all enlisted foot men, shall be a
        single breasted frock of dark blue cloth, made without plaits,
        with a skirt extending one-half the distance from the top of the
        hip to the bend of the knee; one row of nine buttons on the
        breast, placed at equal distances; stand-up collar to rise no
        higher than to permit the chin to turn freely over it, to hook in
        front at the bottom and then to slope up and backward at an angle
        of thirty degrees on each side; cuffs pointed according to
        pattern, and to button with two small buttons at the under seam;
        collar and cuffs edged with a cord or welt of cloth as follows,
        to wit: Scarlet for Artillery; sky-blue for Infantry; yellow for
        Engineers; crimson for Ordnance and Hospital stewards. On each
        shoulder a metallic scale according to pattern; narrow lining for
        skirt of the coat of the same color and material as the coat;
        pockets in the folds of the skirts with one button at each hip to
        range with the lowest buttons on the breast; no buttons at the
        ends of the pockets.
        1483. All Enlisted Men of the Cavalry and Light Artillery
        shall wear a uniform jacket of dark blue cloth, with one row of
        twelve small buttons on the breast placed at equal distances;
        stand-up collar to rise no higher than to permit the chin to turn
        freely over it, to hook in front at the bottom, and to slope the
        same as the coat-collar; on the collar, on each side, two blind
        button-holes of lace, three-eighths of an inch wide, one small
        button on the button-hole, lower button-hole extending back four
        inches, upper button-hole three and a half inches; top button and
        front ends of collar bound with lace three-eighths of an inch
        wide, and a strip of the same extending down the front and around
        the whole lower edge[464] of the jacket; the back seam laced with
        the same, and on the cuff a point of the same shape as that on
        the coat, but formed of the lace; jacket to extend to the waist,
        and to be lined with white flannel; two small buttons at the
        under seam of the cuff, as on the coat cuff; one hook and eye at
        the bottom of the collar; color of lace (worsted), yellow for
        Cavalry, and scarlet for the Light Artillery.
        1484. For all Musicians-the same as for other enlisted men of
        their respective corps, with the addition of a facing of lace
        three-eighths of an inch wide on the front of the coat or jacket,
        made in the following manner: bars of three-eighths of an inch
        worsted lace placed on a line with each button six and one-half
        inches wide at the bottom, and thence gradually expanding upward
        to the last button, counting from the waist up, and contracting
        from thence to the bottom of the collar, where it will be six and
        one-half inches wide, with a strip of the same lace following the
        bars at their outer extremity-the whole presenting something of
        what is called the herring-bone form; the color of the lace
        facing to correspond with the color of the trimming of the corps.
        1485. For Fatigue Purposes-a sack coat of dark blue flannel
        extending half-way down the thigh, and made loose, without sleeve
        or body lining, falling collar, inside pocket on the left side,
        four coat buttons down the front.
        1486. For Recruits-the sack coat will be made with sleeve and
        body lining, the latter of flannel.
        1487. On all occasions of duty, except fatigue, and when out
        of quarters, the coat or jacket shall be buttoned and hooked at
        the collar.

        Buttons.
        1488. For General Officers and Officers of the General
        Staff-gilt, convex, with spread eagle and stars, and plain
        border; large size, seven-eighths of an inch in exterior
        diameter; small size, one-half inch.
        1489. For Officers of the Corps of Engineers-gilt,
        nine-tenths of an inch in exterior diameter, slightly convex; a
        raised bright rim, one-thirtieth of an inch wide; device, an
        eagle holding in his beak a scroll, with the word "Essayons," a
        bastion with embrasures in the distance surrounded by water, with
        a rising sun-the figures to be of dead gold upon a bright field.
        Small buttons of the same form and device, and fifty-five
        hundredths of an inch in exterior diameter.
        1490. For Officers of the Corps of Topographical
        Engineer-gilt, seven-eighths of an inch exterior diameter, convex
        and solid; device, the shield of the United States, occupying
        one-half the diameter, and the letters xxx in old English
        characters the other half; small buttons, one-half inch diameter,
        device and form the same.[465]
        1491. For Officers of the Ordnance Department-gilt, convex,
        plain border, cross cannon and bombshell, with a circular scroll
        over and across the cannon, containing the words "Ordnance
        Corps;" large size, seven-eighths of an inch in exterior
        diameter; small size, one-half inch.
        1492. For Officers of Artillery, Infantry, and Cavalry-gilt,
        convex; device, a spread eagle with the letter A, for
        Artillery-I, for Infantry-C, for Cavalry, on the shield; large
        size, seven-eighths of an inch in exterior diameter; small size,
        one-half inch.
        1493. Aides-de-camp may wear the button of the General Staff,
        or of their regiment or corps, at their option.
        1494. For Medical Cadets-same as for Officers of the General
        Staff.
        1495. For all Enlisted Men-yellow, the same as is used by the
        Artillery, &c., omitting the letter in the shield.

        Trowsers.
        1496. For General Officers and Officers of the Ordnance
        Department-of dark blue cloth, plain, without stripe, welt, or
        cord down the outer seam.
        1497. For Officers of the General Staff and Staff Corps,
        except the Ordnance-dark blue cloth, with a gold cord, one-eighth
        of an inch in diameter, along the outer seam.
        1498. For all Regimental Officers-dark blue cloth, with a
        welt let into the outer seam, one-eighth of an inch in diameter,
        of colors corresponding to the facings of the respective
        regiments, viz.: Cavalry, yellow; Artillery, scarlet; Infantry,
        sky-blue.
        1499. For Medical Cadets-same as for Officers of the General
        Staff, except a welt of buff cloth, instead of a gold cord.
        1500. For Enlisted Men, except companies of Light
        Artillery-dark blue cloth; sergeants with a stripe one and
        one-half inch wide; corporals with a stripe one-half inch wide,
        of worsted lace, down and over the outer seam, of the color of
        the facings of the respective corps.
        1501. Ordnance Sergeants and Hospital Stewards-stripe of
        crimson lace one and one-half inch wide.
        1502. Privates-plain, without stripe or welt.
        1503. For Companies of Artillery equipped as Light
        Artillery-skyblue cloth.
        All trowsers to be made loose, without plaits, and to spread
        well over the boot; to be re-enforced for all enlisted mounted
        men.

        Hat.
        1504. For Officers-of best black felt. The dimensions of
        medium size to be a follows: [456]
        Width of brim, 3¼ inches.
        Height of crown, 6¼ inches.
        Oval of tip, ½ inch.
        Taper of crown, ¾ inch.
        Curve of head, 3/8 inch.
        The binding to be ½ inch deep, of best black ribbed silk.
        1505. For Enlisted Men-of black felt, same shape and size as
        for officers, with double row of stitching, instead of binding,
        around the edge. To agree in quality with the pattern deposited
        in the clothing arsenal.
        1506. Medical Cadets will wear a forage cap according to
        pattern.

        Trimmings.
        1507. For General Officers-gold cord, with acorn-shaped ends.
        The brim of the hat looped up on the right side, and fastened
        with an eagle attached to the side of the hat; three black
        ostrich-feathers on the left side; a gold-embroidered wreath in
        front, on black velvet ground, encircling the letters US
        [insert]. in silver, old English characters.
        1508. For Officers of the Adjutant-General's,
        Inspector-General's, Quartermaster's, Subsistence, Medical and
        Pay Departments, and the Judge Advocate, above the rank of
        Captain-the same as for General Officers, except the cord, which
        will be of black silk and gold.
        1509. For the same Departments, below the rank of Field
        Officers-the same as for Field Officers, except that there will
        be but two feathers.
        1510. For Officers of the Corps of Engineers-the same as for
        the General Staff, except the ornament in front, which will be a
        gold-embroidered wreath of laurel and palm, encircling a silver
        turreted castle on black velvet ground.
        1511. For Officers of the Topographical Engineers-the same as
        for the General Staff, except the ornament in front, which will
        be a gold-embroidered wreath of oak leaves, encircling a
        gold-embroidered shield, on black velvet ground.
        1512. For Officers of the Ordnance Department-the same as for
        the General Staff, except the ornament in front, which will be a
        gold-embroidered shell and flame, on black velvet ground.
        1513. For Officers of Cavalry-the same as for the General
        Staff, except the ornament in front, which will be two
        gold-embroidered sabres crossed, edges upward, on black velvet
        ground, with the number of the regiment in silver in the upper
        angle.
        1514. For Officers of Artillery-the same as for the General
        Staff, except the ornament in front, which will be
        gold-embroidered cross-can-[466]non, on black velvet ground, with
        the number of the regiment in silver at the intersection of the
        cross-cannon.
        1515. For Officers of Infantry-the same as for Artillery,
        except the ornament in front, which will be a gold-embroidered
        bugle, on black velvet ground, with the number of the regiment in
        silver within the bend.
        1516. For Enlisted Men, except companies of Light
        Artillery-the same as for officers of the respective corps,
        except that there will be but one feather, the cord will be of
        worsted, of the same color as that of the facing of the corps,
        three-sixteenths of an inch in diameter, running three times
        through a slide of the same material, and terminating with two
        tassels, not less than two inches long, on the side of the hat
        opposite the feather. The insignia of corps, in brass, in front
        of the hat, corresponding with those prescribed for officers,
        with the number of regiment, five-eighths of an inch long, in
        brass, and letter of company, one inch, in brass, arranged over
        insignia.
        1517. For Hospital Stewards the cord will be of buff and
        green mixed. The wreath in front of brass, with the letters U. S.
        in Roman, of white metal. Brim to be looped up to side of hat
        with a brass eagle, having a hook attached to the bottom to
        secure the brim-on the right side for mounted men and left side
        for foot men. The feather to be worn on the side opposite the
        loop.
        1518. All the trimmings of the hat are to be made so that
        they can be detached; but the eagle, badge of corps, and letter
        of company, are to be always worn.
        1519. For companies of Artillery equipped as Light Artillery,
        the old pattern uniform cap, with red horsehair plume, cord and
        tassel.
        1520. Officers of the General Staff, and Staff Corps, may
        wear, at their option, a light French chapeau, either stiff crown
        or fiat, according to the pattern deposited in the
        Adjutant-General's office. Officers below the rank of field
        officers to wear but two feathers.

        Forage Caps.
        1521. For fatigue purposes, forage caps, of pattern in the
        General's-General's office: dark blue cloth, with a welt of the
        same around the crown, and yellow metal letters in front to
        designate companies.
        1522. Commissioned officers may wear forage caps of the same
        pattern, with the distinctive ornament of the corps and regiment
        in front.

        Cravat or Stock.
        1523. For all Officers-black; when a cravat is worn, the tie
        not to be visible at the opening of the collar.[467]
        1524. For all Enlisted Men-black leather, according to
        pattern.

        Boots.
        1525. For all Officers - ankle or Jefferson.
        1526. For Enlisted Men of Cavalry and Light Artillery-ankle
        and Jefferson, rights and lefts, according to pattern.
        1527. For Enlisted Men of Artillery, Infantry, Engineers, and
        Ordnance-Jefferson, rights and lefts, according to pattern.

        Spurs.
        1528. For all Mounted Officers-yellow metal, or gilt.
        1529. For all Enlisted Mounted Men-yellow metal, according to
        pattern. (See par. 1648.)

        Gloves.
        1530. For General Officers and Officers of the General Staff
        and Staff Corps-buff or white.
        1531. For Officers of Artillery, Infantry, Cavalry, Dragoons,
        and Riflemen-white.

        Sash.
        1532. For General Officers-buff, silk net, with silk bullion
        fringe ends; sash to go twice around the waist, and to tie behind
        the left hip, pendent part not to extend more than eighteen
        inches below the tie.
        1533. For Officers of the Adjutant-General's,
        Inspector-General's, Quartermaster's, and Subsistence
        Departments, Corps of Engineers, Topographical Engineers,
        Ordnance, Artillery, Infantry, Cavalry, and the Judge Advocate of
        the Army-crimson silk net; for Officers of the Medical
        Department-medium or emerald green silk net, with silk bullion
        fringe ends; to go around the waist and tie as for General
        Officers.
        1534. For all Sergeant Majors, Quartermaster Sergeants,
        Ordnance Sergeants, Hospital Stewards, First Sergeants, Principal
        or Chief Musicians and Chief Buglers-red worsted sash, with
        worsted bullion fringe ends; to go twice around the waist, and to
        tie behind the left hip, pendent part not to extend more than
        eighteen inches below the tie.
        1535. The sash will be worn (over the coat) on all occasions
        of duty of every description, except stable and fatigue.
        1536. The sash will be worn by "Officers of the Day" across
        the body, scarf fashion, from the right shoulder to the left
        side, instead of around the waist, tying behind the left hip as
        prescribed.

        Sword-belt.
        1537. For all Officers - a waist-belt not less than one and
        one-half inch nor more than two inches wide; to be worn over the
        sash; the [469]sword to be suspended from it by slings of the
        same material as the belt, with a hook attached to the belt upon
        which the sword may be hung.
        1538. For General Officers - Russia leather, with three
        stripes of gold embroidery; the slings embroidered on both sides.
        1539. For all other Officers - black leather, plain.
        1540. For all Noncommissioned Officers - black leather,
        plain.

        Sword-belt plate.
        1541. For all Officers and Enlisted Men - gilt, rectangular,
        two inches wide, with a raised bright rim; a silver wreath of
        laurel encircling the "Arms of the United States;" eagle, shield,
        scroll, edge of cloud and rays bright. The motto, "E Pluribus
        Unum," in silver letters, upon the scroll; stars also of silver;
        according to pattern.

        Sword and Scabbard.
        1542. For General Officers - straight sword, gilt hilt,
        silver grip, brass or steel scabbard
        1543. For Officers of the Adjutant-General's, Inspector-
        General's, Quartermaster's, and Subsistence Departments, Corps of
        Engineers, Topographical Engineers, Ordnance, the Judge Advocate
        of the Army, Aides-de-Camp, Field Officers of Artillery,
        Infantry, and Foot Riflemen, and for the Light Artillery - the
        sword of the pattern adopted by the War Department, April 9,
        1850; or the one described in General Orders No. 21, of August
        28, 1860, for officers therein designated.
        1544. For the Medical and Pay Departments - small sword and
        scabbard, according to pattern in the Surgeon-General's office.
        1545. For Medical Cadets, the sword and belt and plate will
        be the same as for non-commissioned officers.
        1546. For Officers of Cavalry - sabre and scabbard now in
        use, according to pattern in the Ordnance Department.
        1547. For the Artillery, Infantry, and Foot Riflemen, except
        the field officers - the sword of the pattern adopted by the War
        Department, April 9, 1850.
        1548. The sword and sword-belt will be worn upon all
        occasions of duty, without exception.
        1549. When on foot, the sabre will be suspended from the
        hook attached to the belt.
        1550. When not on military duty, officers may wear swords of
        honor, or the prescribed sword, with a scabbard, gilt, or of
        leather with gilt mountings.[470]

        Sword-knot.
        1551. For General Officers - gold cord with acorn end.
        1552. For all other officers - gold lace strap with gold
        bullion tassel.

        Badges to Distinguish Rank.

        Epaulettes.
        1553. For the Major-General Commanding the Army - gold, with
        solid crescent device, three silver-embroidered stars, one, one
        and a half inches in diameter, one, one and one-fourth inches in
        diameter, and one, one and one-eighth inches in diameter, placed
        on the strap in a row, longitudinally, and equidistant, the
        largest star in the centre of the crescent, the smallest at the
        top; dead and bright gold bullion, one-half inch in diameter and
        three and one-half inches long.
        1554. For all other Major-Generals - the same as for the
        Major-General Commanding the Army, except that there will be two
        stars on the strap instead of three, omitting the smallest.
        1555. For a Brigadier-General - the same as for a
        Major-General, except that, instead of two, there shall be one
        star (omitting the smallest) placed upon the strap, and not
        within the crescent.
        1556. For a Colonel - the same as for a Brigadier-General,
        substituting a silver-embroidered spread eagle for the star upon
        the strap; and within the crescent for the Medical Department-a
        laurel wreath embroidered in gold, and the letters MS, in old
        English characters, in silver, within the wreath; Pay
        Department-,same as the Medical Department, with the letters PD.
        in old English characters; Corps of Engineers-a turreted castle
        of silver; Corps of Topographical Engineers - a shield
        embroidered in gold, and below it the letters TE, in old English
        characters, in silver; Ordnance Department -shell and flame in
        silver embroidery; Regimental Officers - the number of the
        regiment embroidered in gold, within a circlet of embroidered
        silver, one and three-fourths inches in diameter, upon cloth of
        the following colors: for Artillery - scarlet; Infantry - light
        or sky blue; Cavalry - yellow.
        1557. For a Lieutenant-Colonel - the same as for a Colonel,
        according to corps, but substituting for the eagle a
        silver-embroidered leaf.
        1558. For a Major -the same as for a Colonel, according to
        corps, omitting the eagle.
        1559. For a Captain - the same as for a Colonel, according to
        corps, except that the bullion will be only one-fourth of an inch
        in diameter, and two and one-half inches long, and substituting
        for the eagle two silver-embroidered bars.
        1560. For a First Lieutenant - the same as for a Colonel,
        according to [471]corps, except that the bullion will be only
        one-eighth of an inch in diameter, and two and one-half inches
        long, and substituting for the eagle one silver-embroidered bar.
        1561. For a Second Lieutenant - the same as for a First
        Lieutenants omitting the bar.
        1562. For a Brevet Second Lieutenant - the same as for a
        Second Lieutenant.
        1563. All officers having military rank will wear an
        epaulette on each shoulder.
        1564. The epaulette may be dispensed with when not on duty,
        and on certain duties off parade, to wit: at drills, at
        inspections of barracks and hospitals, on Courts of Inquiry and
        Boards, at inspections of articles and necessaries, on working
        parties and fatigue duties, and upon the march, except when, in
        war, there is immediate expectation of meeting the enemy, and
        also when the overcoat is worn.

        Shoulder-Straps.
        1565. For the Major-General Commanding the Army - dark blue
        cloth, one and three-eighths inches wide by four inches long;
        bordered with an embroidery of gold one-fourth of an inch wide;
        three silver-embroidered stars of five rays, one star on the
        centre of the strap, and one on each side equidistant between the
        centre and the outer edge of the strap; the centre star to be the
        largest.
        1566. For all other Major-Generals - the same as for the
        Major-General Commanding the Army, except, that there will be two
        stars instead of three; the centre of each star to be one inch
        from the outer edge of the gold embroidery on the ends of the
        strap; both stars of the same size.
        1567. For a Brigadier-General - the same as for a
        Major-General, except that there will be one star instead of two;
        the centre of the star to be equidistant from the outer edge of
        the embroidery on the ends of the strap.
        1568. For a Colonel - the same size as for a Major-General,
        and bordered in like manner with an embroidery of gold; a
        silver-embroidered spread eagle on the centre of the strap, two
        inches between the tips of the wings, having in the right talon
        an olive-branch, and in the left a bundle of arrows; an
        escutcheon on the breast, as represented in the arms of the
        United States; cloth of the strap as follows: for the General
        Staff and Staff Corps - dark blue; Artillery-scarlet;
        Infantry-light or sky blue; Cavalry - yellow.
        1569. For a Lieutenant-Colonel -;the same as for a Colonel,
        according to corps, omitting the eagle, and introducing a
        silver-embroidered leaf at [472]each end, each leaf extending
        seven-eighths of an inch from the end border of the strap.
        1570. For a Major - the same as for a Colonel, according to
        corps, omitting the eagle, and introducing a gold-embroidered
        leaf at each end, each leaf extending seven-eighths of an inch
        from the end border of the strap.
        1571. For a Captain - the same as for a Colonel, according to
        corps, omitting the eagle, and introducing at each end two
        gold-embroidered bars of the same width as the border, placed
        parallel to the ends of the strap; the distance between them and
        from the border equal to the width of the border.
        1572. For a First lieutenant - the same as for a Colonel,
        according to corps, omitting the eagle, and introducing at each
        end one gold-embroidered bar of the same width as the border,
        placed parallel to the ends of the strap, at a distance from the
        border equal to its width.
        1573. For a Second Lieutenant - the same as for a Colonel,
        according to corps, omitting the eagle.
        1574. For a Brevet Second Lieutenant - the same as for a
        Second Lieutenant.
        1575. For a Medical Cadet - a strip of gold lace three inches
        long, half an inch wide, placed in the middle of a strap of green
        cloth three gad three-quarter inches long by one and one-quarter
        inches wide.
        1576. The shoulder-strap will be worn whenever the epaulette
        is not

        Chevrons.
        1577. The rank of non-commissioned officers will be marked by
        chevrons upon both sleeves of the uniform coat and overcoat,
        above the elbow, of silk or worsted binding one-half an inch
        wide, same color as the edging on the coat, points down, as
        follows:
        1578. For a Sergeant Major - three bars and an arc, in silk.
        1579. For a Quartermaster Sergeant - three bars and a tie, in
        silk.
        1580. For an Ordnance Sergeant -three bars and a star, in
        silk.
        1581. For a Hospital Steward - a half chevron of the
        following description, - viz.: of emerald green cloth, one and
        three-fourths inches wide, running obliquely downward from the
        outer to the inner seam of the sleeve, and at an angle of about
        thirty degrees with a horizontal, parallel to, and one-eighth of
        an inch distant from, both the upper and lower edge, an
        embroidery of yellow silk one-eighth of an inch wide, and in the
        centre a "caduceus" two inches long, embroidered also with yellow
        silk, the head toward the outer seam of the sleeve.
        1582. For a First Sergeant - three bars and a lozenge, in
        worsted.
        1583. For a Sergeant - three bars, in worsted.[473]
        1584. For a Corporal - two bars, in worsted.
        1585. For a Pioneer - two crossed hatchets of cloth, same
        color and material as the edging of the collar, to be sewed on
        each arm above the elbow in the place indicated for a chevron
        (those of a corporal to be just above and resting on the
        chevron), the head of the hatchet upward, its edge outward, of
        the following dimensions, viz.: Handle -four and one-half inches
        long, one-fourth to one-third of an inch wide. Hatchet - two
        inches long, one inch wide at the edge.
        1586. To indicate service - all non-commissioned officers,
        musicians, and privates, who have served faithfully for the term
        of five years, will wear, as a mark of distinction, upon both
        sleeves of the uniform coat, below the elbow, a diagonal half
        chevron, one-half an inch wide, extending from seam to seam, the
        front end nearest the cuff, and one-half an inch above the point
        of the cuff, to be of the same color as the edging on the coat.
        In like manner, an additional half chevron, above and parallel to
        the first, for every subsequent five years of faithful service;
        distance between each chevron one-fourth of an inch. Service in
        war will be indicated by a light or sky blue stripe on each side
        of the chevron for Artillery, and a red stripe for all other
        corps the stripe to be one-eighth of an inch wide.

        Overcoat.

        For Commissioned Officers.
        1587. A "cloak coat" of dark blue cloth, closing by means of
        four frog buttons of black silk and loops of black silk cord down
        the breast, and at the throat by a long loop à échelle, without
        tassel or plate, on the left side, and a black silk frog button
        on the right; cord for the loops fifteen-hundredths of an inch in
        diameter; back, a single piece, slit up from the bottom, from
        fifteen to seventeen inches, according to the height of the
        wearer, and closing at will, by buttons, and button-holes cut in
        a concealed flap; collar of the same color and material as the
        coat, rounded at the edges, and to stand or fall; when standing,
        to be about five inches high; sleeves loose, of a single piece,
        and round at the bottom, without cuff or slit; lining, woolen;
        around the front and lower border, the edges of the pockets, the
        edges of the sleeves, collar, and slit in the back, a flat braid
        of black silk one-half an inch wide; and around each frog button
        on the breast, a knot two and one-quarter inches in diameter of
        black silk cord, seven-hundredths of an inch in diameter,
        arranged according to drawing; cape of the same color and
        material as the coat, removable at the pleasure of the wearer,
        and reaching to the cuff of the coat-sleeve when the arm is
        extended; coat to extend down the leg from six to eight inches
        below the knee, according to height. To indicate rank, there will
        be on both [474] sleeves, near the lower edge, a knot of flat
        black silk braid not exceeding one-eighth of an inch in width,
        arranged according to drawing, and composed as follows:
        1588. For a General - of five braids, double knot.
        1589. For a Colonel - of five braids, single knot.
        1590. For a Lieutenant-Colonel - of four braids, single knot.
        1591. For a Major - of three braids, single knot.
        1592. For a Captain - of two braids, single knot.
        1593. For a First Lieutenant - of one braid, single knot.
        1594. For a Second Lieutenant and Brevet Second Lieutenant -
        a plain sleeve, without knot or ornament.

        For Enlisted Men.

        1595. Of all Mounted Corps - of sky-blue cloth;
        stand-and-fall collar; double-breasted; cape to reach down to the
        cuff of the coat when the arm is extended, and to button all the
        way up; buttons (1467).
        1596. All other Enlisted Men - of sky-blue cloth; stand-up
        collar; single-breasted; cape to reach down to the elbows when
        the arm is extended, and to button all the way up; buttons
        (1467).
        1597. For Cavalry - a gutta-percha talma, or cloak extending
        to the knee, with long sleeves.

        Other articles of clothing and equipment.

        1598. Flannel shirt, drawers, stockings, and stable-frock -
        the same as now furnished.
        1599. Blanket - woolen, gray, with letters U. S. in black,
        four inches long, in the centre; to be seven feet long, and five
        and a half feet wide, and to weigh five pounds.
        1600. Canvas overalls for Engineer soldiers - of white
        cotton; one garment to cover the whole of the body below the
        waist, the breast, the shoulders, and the arms; sleeves loose, to
        allow a free play of the arms, with narrow wristband "buttoning
        with one button; overalls to fasten at the neck behind with two
        buttons, and at the waist behind with buckle and tongue.
        1601. Belts of all Enlisted Men - black leather.
        1602. Cartridge-box - according to pattern in the Ordnance
        Department.
        1603. Drum-sling - white webbing; to be provided with a brass
        drumstick carriage, according to pattern.
        1604. Knapsack - of painted canvas, according to pattern now
        issued by the Quartermaster's Department; the great-coat, when
        carried, to be neatly folded, not rolled, and covered by the
        outer flap of the knapsack[475]
        1605. Haversack - of painted canvas, with an inside sack
        unpainted according to the pattern now issued by the
        Quartermaster's Department.
        1606. Canteen - of tin, covered with woolen cloth, of the
        pattern now issued by the Quartermaster's Department.


        (Horse Equipments omitted.)

        I hope this helps somewhat. As far as headgaar is concerned,
        there is a choice between a hat or forage cap.

        Yr. Obt. Svt.
        G E "Gerry" Mayers

        To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even
        on one's mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the
        Union, a passport to any foreign country, and a benediction from
        the Almighty God. --Anonymous
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Rob & Patti Erickson" <pattirobpatti@...>
        To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Monday, November 03, 2008 5:31 PM
        Subject: [TalkAntietam] Uniforms of the US Regulars at Antietam


        Esteemed memebers, what uniform would have been worn by the US
        Regulars
        at Antietam?

        Would the infantry have worn frock coats and Hardee hats, sack
        coats
        and forage caps, or a combination of styles/equipment?

        Thanks in advance for any information. Rob Erickson
      • Thomas Clemens
        I do not recall ever seeing anything about this issue. You might find a copy of Tim Reese s book on U.S. Regulars to se if there is anything there. None of
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 5, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          I do not recall ever seeing anything about this issue. You might find a copy of Tim Reese's book on U.S. Regulars to se if there is anything there. None of the US Regular officers that wrote to Carman mention uniforms of enlisted men. By regulation, they should be wearing frock coats and hats into battle, but since they had been in constant motion since going to the Peninsula in spring, I doubt they had much of that "finery" left. Much of the Fifth Corps had no knapsacks or eqipment with them in Maryland, so whatever they had when left DC is likely what they wore through the campaign.
          Hope this helps.


          Dr. Thomas G. Clemens
          Professor of History
          Hagerstown Community College




          >>> "Rob & Patti Erickson" <pattirobpatti@...> 11/3/2008 4:31 PM >>>

          Esteemed memebers, what uniform would have been worn by the US Regulars
          at Antietam?

          Would the infantry have worn frock coats and Hardee hats, sack coats
          and forage caps, or a combination of styles/equipment?

          Thanks in advance for any information. Rob Erickson




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Marc73@aol.com
          If my?reading memory?serves me correctly both armies by the time of the Antietam Battle were in their worst condition clothing and supply wise as they?had been
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 5, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            If my?reading memory?serves me correctly both armies by the time of the Antietam Battle were in their worst condition clothing and supply wise as they?had been on the move for quite some time.

            An uneducated quess would be a mixed combination. I have not seen any resource material on what the regulars wore at Antietam.

            Marc Riddell
            1st Minn Co D
            2nd USSS Co C
            Potomac Legion


            -----Original Message-----
            From: Thomas Clemens <clemenst@...>
            To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Wed, 5 Nov 2008 3:54 pm
            Subject: Re: [TalkAntietam] Uniforms of the US Regulars at Antietam






            I do not recall ever seeing anything about this issue. You might find a copy of Tim Reese's book on U.S. Regulars to se if there is anything there. None of the US Regular officers that wrote to Carman mention uniforms of enlisted men. By regulation, they should be wearing frock coats and hats into battle, but since they had been in constant motion since going to the Peninsula in spring, I doubt they had much of that "finery" left. Much of the Fifth Corps had no knapsacks or eqipment with them in Maryland, so whatever they had when left DC is likely what they wore through the campaign.
            Hope this helps.


            Dr. Thomas G. Clemens
            Professor of History
            Hagerstown Community College




            >>> "Rob & Patti Erickson" <pattirobpatti@...> 11/3/2008 4:31 PM >>>

            Esteemed memebers, what uniform would have been worn by the US Regulars
            at Antietam?

            Would the infantry have worn frock coats and Hardee hats, sack coats
            and forage caps, or a combination of styles/equipment?

            Thanks in advance for any information. Rob Erickson




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Nick KURTZ
            When the Federal units retreated into the DC area after 2nd Manassas wouldn t they have had time then to replace jackets, pants, etc from the supply depots? I
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 5, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              When the Federal units retreated into the DC area after 2nd Manassas
              wouldn't they have had time then to replace jackets, pants, etc from the
              supply depots? I dont have a time line in front of me but it seems that
              they were in the DC area long enough to do some resupply.
              --Nick


              >From: Marc73@...
              >Reply-To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
              >To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
              >Subject: Re: [TalkAntietam] Uniforms of the US Regulars at Antietam
              >Date: Wed, 05 Nov 2008 16:08:28 -0500
              >
              >If my?reading memory?serves me correctly both armies by the time of the
              >Antietam Battle were in their worst condition clothing and supply wise as
              >they?had been on the move for quite some time.
              >
              >An uneducated quess would be a mixed combination. I have not seen any
              >resource material on what the regulars wore at Antietam.
              >
              >Marc Riddell
              >1st Minn Co D
              >2nd USSS Co C
              >Potomac Legion
              >
              >
              >-----Original Message-----
              >From: Thomas Clemens <clemenst@...>
              >To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
              >Sent: Wed, 5 Nov 2008 3:54 pm
              >Subject: Re: [TalkAntietam] Uniforms of the US Regulars at Antietam
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >I do not recall ever seeing anything about this issue. You might find a
              >copy of Tim Reese's book on U.S. Regulars to se if there is anything there.
              >None of the US Regular officers that wrote to Carman mention uniforms of
              >enlisted men. By regulation, they should be wearing frock coats and hats
              >into battle, but since they had been in constant motion since going to the
              >Peninsula in spring, I doubt they had much of that "finery" left. Much of
              >the Fifth Corps had no knapsacks or eqipment with them in Maryland, so
              >whatever they had when left DC is likely what they wore through the
              >campaign.
              >Hope this helps.
              >
              >
              >Dr. Thomas G. Clemens
              >Professor of History
              >Hagerstown Community College
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > >>> "Rob & Patti Erickson" <pattirobpatti@...> 11/3/2008 4:31 PM
              > >>>
              >
              >Esteemed memebers, what uniform would have been worn by the US Regulars
              >at Antietam?
              >
              >Would the infantry have worn frock coats and Hardee hats, sack coats
              >and forage caps, or a combination of styles/equipment?
              >
              >Thanks in advance for any information. Rob Erickson
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • Harry Smeltzer
              Oh no, the MIB got to Marc, too. All is lost. Xandar (some of my memory of Calisto is coming back to me) ... From: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
              Message 6 of 7 , Nov 5, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                Oh no, the MIB got to Marc, too.



                All is lost.



                Xandar (some of my memory of Calisto is coming back to me)



                -----Original Message-----
                From: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com] On
                Behalf Of Marc73@...
                Sent: Wednesday, November 05, 2008 4:08 PM
                To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [TalkAntietam] Uniforms of the US Regulars at Antietam



                If my?reading memory?serves me correctly both armies by the time of the
                Antietam Battle were in their worst condition clothing and supply wise as
                they?had been on the move for quite some time.

                An uneducated quess would be a mixed combination. I have not seen any
                resource material on what the regulars wore at Antietam.

                Marc Riddell
                1st Minn Co D
                2nd USSS Co C
                Potomac Legion

                -----Original Message-----
                From: Thomas Clemens <clemenst@hagerstown
                <mailto:clemenst%40hagerstowncc.edu> cc.edu>
                To: TalkAntietam@ <mailto:TalkAntietam%40yahoogroups.com> yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Wed, 5 Nov 2008 3:54 pm
                Subject: Re: [TalkAntietam] Uniforms of the US Regulars at Antietam

                I do not recall ever seeing anything about this issue. You might find a copy
                of Tim Reese's book on U.S. Regulars to se if there is anything there. None
                of the US Regular officers that wrote to Carman mention uniforms of enlisted
                men. By regulation, they should be wearing frock coats and hats into battle,
                but since they had been in constant motion since going to the Peninsula in
                spring, I doubt they had much of that "finery" left. Much of the Fifth Corps
                had no knapsacks or eqipment with them in Maryland, so whatever they had
                when left DC is likely what they wore through the campaign.
                Hope this helps.

                Dr. Thomas G. Clemens
                Professor of History
                Hagerstown Community College

                >>> "Rob & Patti Erickson" <pattirobpatti@
                <mailto:pattirobpatti%40comcast.net> comcast.net> 11/3/2008 4:31 PM >>>

                Esteemed memebers, what uniform would have been worn by the US Regulars
                at Antietam?

                Would the infantry have worn frock coats and Hardee hats, sack coats
                and forage caps, or a combination of styles/equipment?

                Thanks in advance for any information. Rob Erickson

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Harry Smeltzer
                Bullshit. The 350,000 men with that coward McClellan were well equipped, well fed, well rested, well read, and, well, EVERYTHING! And each and every man knew
                Message 7 of 7 , Nov 5, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  Bullshit.



                  The 350,000 men with that coward McClellan were well equipped, well fed,
                  well rested, well read, and, well, EVERYTHING! And each and every man knew
                  exactly what Lee was going to do BEFORE LEE KNEW!



                  Damned apologist.



                  I'd talk more about the squadron of Piper Cubs the Yankees had, but all that
                  stuff's been sealed up in a hangar somewhere in Nevada, in an area patrolled
                  by black helicopters like the one outside my house right now.



                  Harry (at least, that's the name they implanted in my brain along with that
                  chip)



                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com] On
                  Behalf Of Thomas Clemens
                  Sent: Wednesday, November 05, 2008 3:54 PM
                  To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [TalkAntietam] Uniforms of the US Regulars at Antietam



                  I do not recall ever seeing anything about this issue. You might find a copy
                  of Tim Reese's book on U.S. Regulars to se if there is anything there. None
                  of the US Regular officers that wrote to Carman mention uniforms of enlisted
                  men. By regulation, they should be wearing frock coats and hats into battle,
                  but since they had been in constant motion since going to the Peninsula in
                  spring, I doubt they had much of that "finery" left. Much of the Fifth Corps
                  had no knapsacks or eqipment with them in Maryland, so whatever they had
                  when left DC is likely what they wore through the campaign.
                  Hope this helps.


                  Dr. Thomas G. Clemens
                  Professor of History
                  Hagerstown Community College




                  >>> "Rob & Patti Erickson" <pattirobpatti@
                  <mailto:pattirobpatti%40comcast.net> comcast.net> 11/3/2008 4:31 PM >>>

                  Esteemed memebers, what uniform would have been worn by the US Regulars
                  at Antietam?

                  Would the infantry have worn frock coats and Hardee hats, sack coats
                  and forage caps, or a combination of styles/equipment?

                  Thanks in advance for any information. Rob Erickson




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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