Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [TalkAntietam] Re: HF Prisoners

Expand Messages
  • Stephen Recker
    Corey, Howdy. Nope. After the surrender of Harper s Ferry, there were a bunch of Union prisoners, not Confederate prisoners. They were marched back to DC under
    Message 1 of 22 , Jun 26, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Corey,

      Howdy. Nope. After the surrender of Harper's Ferry, there were a bunch
      of Union prisoners, not Confederate prisoners. They were marched back
      to DC under Union guard. It is kind of hard to get your head around, I
      know.

      Stephen

      On Thursday, June 26, 2008, at 02:26 PM, corey.macleod wrote:

      > Stephen, do you mean Union soldiers marched the confederate prisoners
      > back to Washington?
      >
      > --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, Stephen Recker <recker@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > If the Confederates captured all of the Union soldiers at Harper's
      > > Ferry right before the Battle of Antietam, and if the Union Army
      > > marched the Union prisoners under guard back to Washington and to
      > > prisons beyond, who were the Union soldiers who guarded the Union
      > > prisoners as they marched to D.C.? Thanks.
      > >
      > > Stephen Recker
      > >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • G E Mayers
      Dear Stephen, Since they were paroled prisoners from the surrendered HF garrison, and since there were so many of them, would it not make sense to have them
      Message 2 of 22 , Jun 26, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Dear Stephen,

        Since they were "paroled" prisoners from the surrendered HF
        garrison, and since there were so many of them, would it not make
        sense to have them escorted back to DC under guard of Union
        infantry. After all, according to the protocols, they could not
        rejoin their larger units and resume active duty until they were
        properly exchanged, correct?

        Corey, the surrender of the US garrison at HF (Harper's Ferry)
        during the Maryland 1862 campaign would remain the largest
        single, mass surrender of US Army forces until the garrison on
        Bataan surrendered in early 1942 to the Japanese Imperial Army
        during the Second World War.

        Yr. Obt. Svt.
        G E "Gerry" Mayers

        To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even
        on one's mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the
        Union, a passport to any foreign country, and a benediction from
        the Almighty God. --Anonymous
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Stephen Recker" <recker@...>
        To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Thursday, June 26, 2008 5:22 PM
        Subject: Re: [TalkAntietam] Re: HF Prisoners


        > Corey,
        >
        > Howdy. Nope. After the surrender of Harper's Ferry, there were
        > a bunch
        > of Union prisoners, not Confederate prisoners. They were
        > marched back
        > to DC under Union guard. It is kind of hard to get your head
        > around, I
        > know.
        >
        > Stephen
        >
        > On Thursday, June 26, 2008, at 02:26 PM, corey.macleod wrote:
        >
        >> Stephen, do you mean Union soldiers marched the confederate
        >> prisoners
        >> back to Washington?
        >>
        >> --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, Stephen Recker
        >> <recker@...> wrote:
        >> >
        >> > If the Confederates captured all of the Union soldiers at
        >> > Harper's
        >> > Ferry right before the Battle of Antietam, and if the Union
        >> > Army
        >> > marched the Union prisoners under guard back to Washington
        >> > and to
        >> > prisons beyond, who were the Union soldiers who guarded the
        >> > Union
        >> > prisoners as they marched to D.C.? Thanks.
        >> >
        >> > Stephen Recker
        >> >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
      • Troy Cool
        Fellows, It is my understanding that after the parole the units left under the command and discipline of thier own officers (one reason the officers retained
        Message 3 of 22 , Jun 26, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          Fellows,
          It is my understanding that after the parole the units left under the command and discipline of thier own officers (one reason the officers retained thier side arms) and were not technically under guard until they had returned to Federal lines. Here they then were dealt with in various manners to prevent desertion etc.  I believe the first troops encountered would have been Franklin's Corps but have not read of the actual exchange.  Anyone know those details?






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Troy Cool
          Sorry,   Sincerely, Troy ... From: G E Mayers Subject: Re: [TalkAntietam] Re: HF Prisoners To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com Date:
          Message 4 of 22 , Jun 26, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            Sorry,
             
            Sincerely,
            Troy

            --- On Thu, 6/26/08, G E Mayers <gerry1952@...> wrote:

            From: G E Mayers <gerry1952@...>
            Subject: Re: [TalkAntietam] Re: HF Prisoners
            To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Thursday, June 26, 2008, 9:24 PM






            Dear Stephen,

            Since they were "paroled" prisoners from the surrendered HF
            garrison, and since there were so many of them, would it not make
            sense to have them escorted back to DC under guard of Union
            infantry. After all, according to the protocols, they could not
            rejoin their larger units and resume active duty until they were
            properly exchanged, correct?

            Corey, the surrender of the US garrison at HF (Harper's Ferry)
            during the Maryland 1862 campaign would remain the largest
            single, mass surrender of US Army forces until the garrison on
            Bataan surrendered in early 1942 to the Japanese Imperial Army
            during the Second World War.

            Yr. Obt. Svt.
            G E "Gerry" Mayers

            To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even
            on one's mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the
            Union, a passport to any foreign country, and a benediction from
            the Almighty God. --Anonymous
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Stephen Recker" <recker@virtualgetty sburg.com>
            To: <TalkAntietam@ yahoogroups. com>
            Sent: Thursday, June 26, 2008 5:22 PM
            Subject: Re: [TalkAntietam] Re: HF Prisoners

            > Corey,
            >
            > Howdy. Nope. After the surrender of Harper's Ferry, there were
            > a bunch
            > of Union prisoners, not Confederate prisoners. They were
            > marched back
            > to DC under Union guard. It is kind of hard to get your head
            > around, I
            > know.
            >
            > Stephen
            >
            > On Thursday, June 26, 2008, at 02:26 PM, corey.macleod wrote:
            >
            >> Stephen, do you mean Union soldiers marched the confederate
            >> prisoners
            >> back to Washington?
            >>
            >> --- In TalkAntietam@ yahoogroups. com, Stephen Recker
            >> <recker@...> wrote:
            >> >
            >> > If the Confederates captured all of the Union soldiers at
            >> > Harper's
            >> > Ferry right before the Battle of Antietam, and if the Union
            >> > Army
            >> > marched the Union prisoners under guard back to Washington
            >> > and to
            >> > prisons beyond, who were the Union soldiers who guarded the
            >> > Union
            >> > prisoners as they marched to D.C.? Thanks.
            >> >
            >> > Stephen Recker
            >> >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >


















            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Stephen Recker
            Interesting. Thanks. Stephen ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 22 , Jun 26, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              Interesting. Thanks.

              Stephen


              On Thursday, June 26, 2008, at 09:53 PM, Troy Cool wrote:

              > Fellows,
              > It is my understanding that after the parole the units left under the
              > command and discipline of thier own officers (one reason the officers
              > retained thier side arms) and were not technically under guard until
              > they had returned to Federal lines. Here they then were dealt with in
              > various manners to prevent desertion etc.  I believe the first troops
              > encountered would have been Franklin's Corps but have not read of the
              > actual exchange.  Anyone know those details?


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.