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Re: [TalkAntietam] CW and UGRR museum to move

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  • 128thpa@comcast.net
    Well, I agree with you about the staff. One of the things I liked about volunteering there - I just didn t get to do tours, but I got to help folks with their
    Message 1 of 47 , Mar 22, 2008
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      Well, I agree with you about the staff. One of the things I liked about volunteering there - I just didn't get to do tours, but I got to help folks with their research and I did quite a bit of my own there. It really was fun and I learned a great deal.

      Apparently there is some miscommunication among the staff there. Perhaps the museum itself is closing to the public in July, but the staff may still have their offices operating through Sept? I know the new owner is very anxious to take possession of the building. He is going to convert it back to a residence. As I stated earlier, I did confirm this with a paid staff person the July date and as volunteers we are being told that after July, they will still need us to help pack. Now, that doesn't mean that something could occur to change all that. I would still recommend to folks that if they want to see the museum that they come by the end of July, because after that - who knows.

      BTW, the museum is going to need funds to help with the preservation of some of the items before they move. For example, Old Baldy's head - they are not sure what was used to preserve it. My CWRT is raising funds to help with the moving of Old Baldy. I was told that his head has to be x-rayed and checked out for hazardous materials before it is moved. Richard, does your brother know anything about that?

      Thanks,

      Paula

      -------------- Original message --------------
      From: <richard@...>
      Hummmm -- my brother's company is contracted to do the packing and moving and I sent your email to him. He had told me some time ago that they had bid on the contract. He's an art and artifact handler. He called the curator and got the info I sent you.

      How very odd.

      The museum is one of my favorites. They were very helpful when I was researching "No Greater Courage."

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: 128thpa@...
      To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, March 21, 2008 10:08 AM
      Subject: [TalkAntietam] CW and UGRR museum to move

      Richard:

      I am a volunteer at the museum and I also just verified this with their education director and they are closing their doors the end of July. We were told as volunteers that we would be needed after that to start packing.

      May I ask if not who your friend is, then what connection they have?

      Thanks,
      Paula

      -------------- Original message --------------
      From: <richard@...>
      A very well connected friend of mine tells me that the museum is ending
      programs July 31 -- but that they will remain open through September,

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: <128thpa@...>
      To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, March 19, 2008 9:58 AM
      Subject: [TalkAntietam] CW and UGRR museum to move

      The Civil War and Underground Railroad museum, at 1805 Pine St in
      Philadelphia will be closing at the end of July, 08 for about 2 years in
      preparation of their move. The museum will be moving to the former 1st
      National Bank of the United States at 3rd and Walnut which will provide more
      room for their holdings. If you plan on seeing the museum and haven't done
      so, you should do it by July or you will have to wait until 2010. This is
      the website, however, I must tell you that it hasn't been updated in awhile,
      but the basic info is correct.
      http://www.cwurmuseum.org/pages/PhilaCivilWar.htm
      Also, the home page wasn't working this AM, the other pages were. The CW
      and UGRR museum is the home of Meade's horse, Old Baldy's head and it
      contains the saddle that John Reynolds was on when he was killed. Other
      items of note, items belonging to Meade, Grant, Lincoln and a large
      collection of military escutcheons.

      From the web site:
      "The Civil War and Underground Railroad Museum of Philadelphia (formerly the
      Civil War Library and Museum) is America's oldest chartered Civil War
      institution. Founded in 1888 by the members of The Military Order of the
      Loyal Legion of the United States (MOLLUS), a post-war veteran's group
      composed of former Army, Navy, and Marine Corps, the organization moved to
      its present location at 1805 Pine Street in 1922."

      "The largest room in our current home is dedicated to the artifacts and
      images related to President Abraham Lincoln. In addition to numerous images,
      drawn, painted and photographed, of the former President, the Museum's
      collection also includes casts of his hands and a death mask. In addition to
      our collection, Philadelphia is fortunate to have another remarkable
      collection of material related to Lincoln, housed by the Union League of
      Philadelphia. "
      You can see a photo of the building here:
      http://www.nps.gov/history/history/online_books/butowsky2/constitution5.htm

      I am a volunteer at the museum, so if you have any questions, I will try and
      answer them or give you a contact point that can.
      Paula

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    • RoteBaron
      Gerry, I was referring to the counterattack by 27th NC & 3rd ARK after Bloody Lane fell. It s covered by Sears on pg 250 of LANDSCAPE TURNED RED, but Armstrong
      Message 47 of 47 , Apr 10 2:38 PM
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        Gerry,

        I was referring to the counterattack by 27th NC & 3rd ARK after Bloody Lane fell. It's covered by Sears on pg 250 of LANDSCAPE TURNED RED, but Armstrong provides far more detail.

        Tom Shay

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: G E Mayers
        To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, April 10, 2008 2:55 PM
        Subject: Re: [TalkAntietam] Re: Bees in the Bloody Lane


        Tom,

        The Rebel counterattacks before the collapse or after the
        collapse of the CSA center?

        Yr. Obt. Svt.
        G E "Gerry" Mayers

        To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even
        on one's mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the
        Union, a passport to any foreign country, and a benediction from
        the Almighty God. --Anonymous
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: <RoteBaron@...>
        To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Thursday, April 10, 2008 2:51 PM
        Subject: Re: [TalkAntietam] Re: Bees in the Bloody Lane

        > I'm partcularly impressed with Armstrong's thorough accounting
        > of the actions of French and Richardson's regiments after the
        > Sunken Road is taken. Their maneuverings to react to 27th NC &
        > 3rd ARK are complex and worthy of a future field hike.
        >
        > After the total collapse of the Sunken Road position, it's
        > amazing that the Rebel counterattack managed to reach the
        > Roulette Farmstead. The maps are critical to understanding the
        > flow of this fight..
        >
        > Tom Shay
        >
        > -------------- Original message --------------
        > From: "Steve" <myness@...>
        > Mr. Armstrong signed my copy and also showed me the detailed
        > maps he
        > used, which are reproduced in miniature throughout the book -
        > IIRC, he
        > used the Cope maps as a basis and then added details or
        > additional maps
        > as needed to fully detail the actions of the 2nd Corps.
        >
        > I just finished his "Disaster in the West Woods," which appears
        > to be a
        > condensed version of "Unfurl Those Colors." He makes valid
        > points
        > defending Sumner's decision to commit Sedgwick in the West
        > Woods, but
        > still takes him to task for the unwieldy formation used in the
        > attack.
        > He offers quite a different perspective from Sears, who has a
        > very low
        > opinion of the 2nd Corps commander.
        >
        > I fully expect Armstrong's new book to challenge my
        > understanding of
        > the battle, and look forward to visiting the field again with
        > some new
        > perspectives.
        >
        > Steve
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >





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