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Re: Muster Dates

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  • eighth_conn_inf
    Dean, Looks like green may require your imposed definition. If you define it as a regiment with a majority of men who have never been in combat, then you
    Message 1 of 48 , Feb 1, 2008
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      Dean,

      Looks like "green" may require your imposed definition. If you define
      it as a regiment with a majority of men who have never been in
      combat, then you have a good list already. But as you point out
      then "green" could also then mean a regiment with a majority of men
      who have been together for several months and have drilled, etc.,
      then that is a different kettle of fish (fresh fish). This would
      include most of the heavy artillery units around DC which turned into
      excellent cannon fodder during the Overland Campaign.

      IMO, "green" means a regiment which never has been in combat. But
      arguably a green regiment having drilled together and perhaps had
      marksmanship training would likely be much more effective than
      a "green" one which had none of that. I suppose you could assign a
      number from 1 to 10, 1 being brand new with no experience in anything
      to 10 being a regiment which has been in combat several times. This
      sounds like a great masters thesis topic.

      Larry F.


      --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "dean_essig" <dean_essig@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Bill,
      >
      > Gallagher cites Ida V. Brown _Michigan in the Civil War_ as the
      source for the drilling
      > information.
      >
      > I take it you are arguing that they should fall into my "green"
      category (along with the
      > other limited service time regiments)? I rather wish they had more
      service at Antietam to
      > add to their good performance at South Mountain to make the
      evaluation clearer.
      >
      > It's possible for me to set up their ratings to account for being
      both green _and_
      > reasonably effective, but I have to be sure in any event. That
      would make for a very
      > interesting looking unit.
      >
      > Thank you for your interest!
      >
      > Dean
      >
      > --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "Bill and Glenna Jo Christen"
      <gwjchris@>
      > wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > Dean,
      > > Recruiting for the Seventeenth did started in May 1862, but took
      the entire summer to
      > fill the ranks of each company. The companies from across the came
      together in August
      > and during the last week of the month were mustered in at the
      Detroit Barracks.
      > >
      > > I believe that there is one sentence in Michigan in the War that
      mentions Pitman, and he
      > may have been responsible for training (Gallahger's source?). The
      colonel of the Regiment,
      > William Withington, had been a captain in the First Michigan
      Infantry (captured at First
      > Manassas and not released until the summer of 1862). A few of the
      other company officers
      > had seen service during the first year of the war.
      > >
      > > Bill Christen
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
    • G E Mayers
      Dear Stephen, One thing is clear...the Sunken Road slide, and I suspect the others....are meant to be viewed in either a magic lantern or a stereoscopic viewer
      Message 48 of 48 , Feb 9, 2008
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        Dear Stephen,

        One thing is clear...the Sunken Road slide, and I suspect the
        others....are meant to be viewed in either a magic lantern or a
        stereoscopic viewer of some sort.

        This particular photo seems to be one of the more famed post view
        views of the Sunken Road. The cabin in the distance is, IIRC,
        that built for one of the freed slaves formerly owned by Mr
        Piper. The cabin is on the edge of the Piper Farm property.

        Yr. Obt. Svt.
        G E "Gerry" Mayers

        To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even
        on one's mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the
        Union, a passport to any foreign country, and a benediction from
        the Almighty God. --Anonymous
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Stephen Recker" <recker@...>
        To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, February 09, 2008 8:46 AM
        Subject: [TalkAntietam] Recher photo dates


        >I am trying to date these photos/stereoviews taken by
        >Hagerstown's own
        > E.M. Recher.
        >
        > SUNKEN ROAD
        > http://www.virtualantietam.com/dan_transfer/recher1.jpg
        > I believe the printing of this stereoview dates from 1880-1882.
        > It is
        > on a flat orange mount with rounded corners with no list on the
        > back.
        > It is in a series with views of Simon's dedication (1880). I
        > have found
        > the photo in three books with three different dates for the
        > negative -
        > 1872, 1877, and 1880. The log cabin is present in a 1904 view
        > of the
        > 130th PA veterans, so that does not help with the dating.
        >
        <snip>
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