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With apologies to Joyce Kilmer

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  • 128thpa@comcast.net
    The 128th Pa stood upon the knoll, Many that day would lose their soul. Upon that day in mid-September, Just hoping that someone would remember, Their
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 29, 2008
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      The 128th Pa stood upon the knoll,
      Many that day would lose their soul.
      Upon that day in mid-September,
      Just hoping that someone would remember,
      Their sacrifice upon the field,
      Their courage and bravery no one could steal.

      And so I now end this poem,
      I do admit, I am a drone,
      For poems were made by fools like me,
      But only God can make a General Lee!

      Paula(who shouldn't give up her day job)






      -------------- Original message --------------
      From: "Thomas Clemens" <clemenst@...>
      And marching forth in grim array,
      the gallant souls dressed in gray,
      who in their firmness would not yield
      the bloody soil of Miller's field,

      Nor those ensconced on Otto's ridge,
      stolidly defending the stone bridge,
      stemmed the teeming tide of blue,
      until the day was nearly through.

      Maybe we're onto something, want ot give it a go???

      Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
      Professor of History
      Hagerstown Community College

      >>> <128thpa@...> 01/29/08 8:23 PM >>>
      Tom:

      You are quite right,
      Rhyming verse would be insane.
      How very difficult to describe,
      The fighting in the Bloody Lane.

      Paula

      Paula,
      I would never want to hold poets to strict historical accuracy. If we
      did, then they could expect us to write history in rhyming verse, and
      that ain't gonna happen, is it? It is a wonderful poem and tells a good
      story. Even if it is n't true it addresses the idea that this was
      a"limited war" where civilians were not randomly killed, etc. There is
      a new book about this concept, which Jim McPherson reviewed in the NY
      Times this week.

      Dr. Thomas G. Clemens
      Professor of History
      Hagerstown Community College

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Joseph Pierro
      Rhyme something with Rohrbach or Poffenberger, then I ll be impressed. . . . ;) ... From: 128thpa@comcast.net To:
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 29, 2008
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        Rhyme something with "Rohrbach" or "Poffenberger," then I'll be impressed. . . . ;)


        ----- Original Message ----
        From: "128thpa@..." <128thpa@...>
        To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tuesday, January 29, 2008 10:53:58 PM
        Subject: [TalkAntietam] With apologies to Joyce Kilmer

        The 128th Pa stood upon the knoll,
        Many that day would lose their soul.
        Upon that day in mid-September,
        Just hoping that someone would remember,
        Their sacrifice upon the field,
        Their courage and bravery no one could steal.

        And so I now end this poem,
        I do admit, I am a drone,
        For poems were made by fools like me,
        But only God can make a General Lee!

        Paula(who shouldn't give up her day job)

        ------------ -- Original message ------------ --
        From: "Thomas Clemens" <clemenst@hagerstown cc.edu>
        And marching forth in grim array,
        the gallant souls dressed in gray,
        who in their firmness would not yield
        the bloody soil of Miller's field,

        Nor those ensconced on Otto's ridge,
        stolidly defending the stone bridge,
        stemmed the teeming tide of blue,
        until the day was nearly through.

        Maybe we're onto something, want ot give it a go???

        Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
        Professor of History
        Hagerstown Community College

        >>> <128thpa@comcast. net> 01/29/08 8:23 PM >>>
        Tom:

        You are quite right,
        Rhyming verse would be insane.
        How very difficult to describe,
        The fighting in the Bloody Lane.

        Paula

        Paula,
        I would never want to hold poets to strict historical accuracy. If we
        did, then they could expect us to write history in rhyming verse, and
        that ain't gonna happen, is it? It is a wonderful poem and tells a good
        story. Even if it is n't true it addresses the idea that this was
        a"limited war" where civilians were not randomly killed, etc. There is
        a new book about this concept, which Jim McPherson reviewed in the NY
        Times this week.

        Dr. Thomas G. Clemens
        Professor of History
        Hagerstown Community College

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Harry Smeltzer
        There once was a man from Carass, Whose.oops, wrong forum! ... From: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 30, 2008
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          There once was a man from Carass,

          Whose.oops, wrong forum!



          -----Original Message-----
          From: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com] On
          Behalf Of 128thpa@...
          Sent: Tuesday, January 29, 2008 10:54 PM
          To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [TalkAntietam] With apologies to Joyce Kilmer



          The 128th Pa stood upon the knoll,
          Many that day would lose their soul.
          Upon that day in mid-September,
          Just hoping that someone would remember,
          Their sacrifice upon the field,
          Their courage and bravery no one could steal.

          And so I now end this poem,
          I do admit, I am a drone,
          For poems were made by fools like me,
          But only God can make a General Lee!

          Paula(who shouldn't give up her day job)

          -------------- Original message --------------
          From: "Thomas Clemens" <clemenst@hagerstown
          <mailto:clemenst%40hagerstowncc.edu> cc.edu>
          And marching forth in grim array,
          the gallant souls dressed in gray,
          who in their firmness would not yield
          the bloody soil of Miller's field,

          Nor those ensconced on Otto's ridge,
          stolidly defending the stone bridge,
          stemmed the teeming tide of blue,
          until the day was nearly through.

          Maybe we're onto something, want ot give it a go???

          Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
          Professor of History
          Hagerstown Community College

          >>> <128thpa@comcast. <mailto:128thpa%40comcast.net> net> 01/29/08 8:23 PM
          >>>
          Tom:

          You are quite right,
          Rhyming verse would be insane.
          How very difficult to describe,
          The fighting in the Bloody Lane.

          Paula

          Paula,
          I would never want to hold poets to strict historical accuracy. If we
          did, then they could expect us to write history in rhyming verse, and
          that ain't gonna happen, is it? It is a wonderful poem and tells a good
          story. Even if it is n't true it addresses the idea that this was
          a"limited war" where civilians were not randomly killed, etc. There is
          a new book about this concept, which Jim McPherson reviewed in the NY
          Times this week.

          Dr. Thomas G. Clemens
          Professor of History
          Hagerstown Community College

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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