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Re: Question

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  • James W. Durney
    No one has mentioned Priest s book on the battle. The first Antietam book I read was Sears book, somehow it left me with a very bad impression of the battle.
    Message 1 of 30 , May 29, 2007
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      No one has mentioned Priest's book on the battle. The first Antietam
      book I read was Sears' book, somehow it left me with a very bad
      impression of the battle. Years later, I picked up the Preist book and
      found a different view, which lead me to Harsh's work. I know Priest
      has been savaged for his South Mt. battle book by some people.
      However, I would like to know why his Antietam book has been left off
      every list.

      James
    • G E Mayers
      James, Priest is good also, but a lot of what he writes or cites is just plain wrong.... There are many instances of his citations being wrong or incorrect. He
      Message 2 of 30 , May 29, 2007
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        James,

        Priest is good also, but a lot of what he writes or cites is just
        plain wrong.... There are many instances of his citations being
        wrong or incorrect.

        He also can be very confusing to read..............

        Yr. Obt. Svt.
        G E "Gerry" Mayers

        To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even
        on one's mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the
        Union, a passport to any foreign country, and a benediction from
        the Almighty God. --Anonymous
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "James W. Durney" <JWD2044@...>
        To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, May 29, 2007 11:07 AM
        Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Question


        No one has mentioned Priest's book on the battle. The first
        Antietam
        book I read was Sears' book, somehow it left me with a very bad
        impression of the battle. Years later, I picked up the Preist
        book and
        found a different view, which lead me to Harsh's work. I know
        Priest
        has been savaged for his South Mt. battle book by some people.
        However, I would like to know why his Antietam book has been left
        off
        every list.

        James
      • Phen62
        Having read Sears, as much as Priet as I could wade through, and Harsh, I favor Harsh. I think if you are going to read Harsh it is helpful to Read Confederate
        Message 3 of 30 , May 29, 2007
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          Having read Sears, as much as Priet as I could wade through, and
          Harsh, I favor Harsh. I think if you are going to read Harsh it is
          helpful to Read Confederate Tide Rising as well as Taken at the Flood.
          I believe he meant them to be one work. Of all the books mentioned,
          Sears has by far the best maps, not a small consideration.

          Stephen
        • G E Mayers
          Dear Stephen, Your point about Harsh is definitely well taken. However, Sears maps are not as good as those in Murfin s Gleam of Bayonets. Yr. Obt. Svt. G E
          Message 4 of 30 , May 29, 2007
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            Dear Stephen,

            Your point about Harsh is definitely well taken.

            However, Sears' maps are not as good as those in Murfin's Gleam
            of Bayonets.

            Yr. Obt. Svt.
            G E "Gerry" Mayers

            To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even
            on one's mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the
            Union, a passport to any foreign country, and a benediction from
            the Almighty God. --Anonymous
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Phen62" <phen@...>
            To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Tuesday, May 29, 2007 10:18 PM
            Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Question


            Having read Sears, as much as Priet as I could wade through, and
            Harsh, I favor Harsh. I think if you are going to read Harsh it
            is
            helpful to Read Confederate Tide Rising as well as Taken at the
            Flood.
            I believe he meant them to be one work. Of all the books
            mentioned,
            Sears has by far the best maps, not a small consideration.

            Stephen
          • T. R. Livesey
            I agree with Gerry: Murfin s maps are better than Sears . Priest s maps are better than Sears . The Carman-Cope Atlas of the battlefield of Antietam , of
            Message 5 of 30 , May 30, 2007
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              I agree with Gerry: Murfin's maps are better than Sears'. Priest's
              maps are better than Sears'.

              The Carman-Cope "Atlas of the battlefield of Antietam", of course, is
              in a class of its own.

              TRL

              --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "G E Mayers" <gerry1952@...> wrote:
              >
              > Dear Stephen,
              >
              > Your point about Harsh is definitely well taken.
              >
              > However, Sears' maps are not as good as those in Murfin's Gleam
              > of Bayonets.
              >
              > Yr. Obt. Svt.
              > G E "Gerry" Mayers
              >
              > To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even
              > on one's mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the
              > Union, a passport to any foreign country, and a benediction from
              > the Almighty God. --Anonymous
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: "Phen62" <phen@...>
              > To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
              > Sent: Tuesday, May 29, 2007 10:18 PM
              > Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Question
              >
              >
              > Having read Sears, as much as Priet as I could wade through, and
              > Harsh, I favor Harsh. I think if you are going to read Harsh it
              > is
              > helpful to Read Confederate Tide Rising as well as Taken at the
              > Flood.
              > I believe he meant them to be one work. Of all the books
              > mentioned,
              > Sears has by far the best maps, not a small consideration.
              >
              > Stephen
              >
            • G E Mayers
              Dear Todd, IIRC Murfin used the Cope maps for his book.... Yr. Obt. Svt. G E Gerry Mayers To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even on
              Message 6 of 30 , May 30, 2007
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                Dear Todd,

                IIRC Murfin used the Cope maps for his book....

                Yr. Obt. Svt.
                G E "Gerry" Mayers

                To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even
                on one's mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the
                Union, a passport to any foreign country, and a benediction from
                the Almighty God. --Anonymous
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "T. R. Livesey" <tlivesey@...>
                To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Wednesday, May 30, 2007 12:40 PM
                Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Question


                I agree with Gerry: Murfin's maps are better than Sears'.
                Priest's
                maps are better than Sears'.

                The Carman-Cope "Atlas of the battlefield of Antietam", of
                course, is
                in a class of its own.

                TRL

                --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "G E Mayers" <gerry1952@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Dear Stephen,
                >
                > Your point about Harsh is definitely well taken.
                >
                > However, Sears' maps are not as good as those in Murfin's Gleam
                > of Bayonets.
                >
                > Yr. Obt. Svt.
                > G E "Gerry" Mayers
                >
                > To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even
                > on one's mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the
                > Union, a passport to any foreign country, and a benediction
                > from
                > the Almighty God. --Anonymous
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: "Phen62" <phen@...>
                > To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
                > Sent: Tuesday, May 29, 2007 10:18 PM
                > Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Question
                >
                >
                > Having read Sears, as much as Priet as I could wade through,
                > and
                > Harsh, I favor Harsh. I think if you are going to read Harsh it
                > is
                > helpful to Read Confederate Tide Rising as well as Taken at the
                > Flood.
                > I believe he meant them to be one work. Of all the books
                > mentioned,
                > Sears has by far the best maps, not a small consideration.
                >
                > Stephen
                >
              • T. R. Livesey
                Gerry, In Murfin s introduction, he states that the maps are the work of James D. Bowlby, the result of 10 years of field surveys, a revision of the Cope maps.
                Message 7 of 30 , May 30, 2007
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                  Gerry,

                  In Murfin's introduction, he states that the maps are the work of
                  James D. Bowlby, the result of 10 years of field surveys, a revision
                  of the Cope maps. The base map looks a lot like the Cope maps, but
                  use terrain symbols much more suitable for smaller-scale reproduction.
                  There are a few differences: one shows a corn field where the other
                  shows clover, etc. Inexplicably, the elevation contour lines have
                  been removed in Murphin's, seriously compromising their usefulness.

                  Priest uses the "Parks and History Association" map as his base, which
                  I think more closely follows the Cope maps. It uses symbols that are
                  similar, but not identical to the Cope maps. I don't know the history
                  of this map. It too lacks elevation markings.

                  From my experience, including elevation markings is always a
                  challenge, especially if you want to zoom out and show a broader
                  expanse of area. The downside, of course, is that you end up with
                  maps that look like the way Sears' text reads: there is no way to
                  really understand how the terrain affects the situation. For example,
                  in the maps of all three of these books, the reader cannot appreciate
                  the situation in the 40 acre cornfield: how can the 4RI get `lost'?
                  How can A.P. Hill come up out of nowhere on Burnside's left? I think
                  a serious argument can be made that the elevation information is more
                  important than the ground cover information (woods vs. corn vs.
                  clover, etc.). But ground cover maps are more aesthetically pleasing
                  to look at and readers are drawn to them.

                  The obvious solution to the `busying-up' effect of contour lines is to
                  use contours of greater intervals: 50 ft. instead of 20 ft. or
                  whatever. Curiously, the version of the Parks and History Association
                  map sold at the Antietam bookstore is plenty large for contour
                  makings, but they are nonetheless omitted. I think somehow the authors
                  of these maps have simply decided that elevation markings are not
                  necessary. This is why the Cope maps are far more useful than any of
                  these others.

                  TRL

                  --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "G E Mayers" <gerry1952@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Dear Todd,
                  >
                  > IIRC Murfin used the Cope maps for his book....
                  >
                  > Yr. Obt. Svt.
                  > G E "Gerry" Mayers
                  >
                  > To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even
                  > on one's mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the
                  > Union, a passport to any foreign country, and a benediction from
                  > the Almighty God. --Anonymous
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: "T. R. Livesey" <tlivesey@...>
                  > To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
                  > Sent: Wednesday, May 30, 2007 12:40 PM
                  > Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Question
                  >
                  >
                  > I agree with Gerry: Murfin's maps are better than Sears'.
                  > Priest's
                  > maps are better than Sears'.
                  >
                  > The Carman-Cope "Atlas of the battlefield of Antietam", of
                  > course, is
                  > in a class of its own.
                  >
                  > TRL
                  >

                  >
                • G E Mayers
                  Thanks Todd. BTW the Trailhead Graphics map of Antietam is simply superb... but unfortunately not possible to put in a book. Yr. Obt. Svt. G E Gerry Mayers
                  Message 8 of 30 , May 30, 2007
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                    Thanks Todd.

                    BTW the Trailhead Graphics map of Antietam is simply superb...
                    but unfortunately not possible to put in a book.

                    Yr. Obt. Svt.
                    G E "Gerry" Mayers

                    To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even
                    on one's mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the
                    Union, a passport to any foreign country, and a benediction from
                    the Almighty God. --Anonymous
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "T. R. Livesey" <tlivesey@...>
                    To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Wednesday, May 30, 2007 1:36 PM
                    Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Question


                    Gerry,

                    In Murfin's introduction, he states that the maps are the work of
                    James D. Bowlby, the result of 10 years of field surveys, a
                    revision
                    of the Cope maps. The base map looks a lot like the Cope maps,
                    but
                    use terrain symbols much more suitable for smaller-scale
                    reproduction.
                    There are a few differences: one shows a corn field where the
                    other
                    shows clover, etc. Inexplicably, the elevation contour lines
                    have
                    been removed in Murphin's, seriously compromising their
                    usefulness.

                    Priest uses the "Parks and History Association" map as his base,
                    which
                    I think more closely follows the Cope maps. It uses symbols that
                    are
                    similar, but not identical to the Cope maps. I don't know the
                    history
                    of this map. It too lacks elevation markings.

                    From my experience, including elevation markings is always a
                    challenge, especially if you want to zoom out and show a broader
                    expanse of area. The downside, of course, is that you end up
                    with
                    maps that look like the way Sears' text reads: there is no way to
                    really understand how the terrain affects the situation. For
                    example,
                    in the maps of all three of these books, the reader cannot
                    appreciate
                    the situation in the 40 acre cornfield: how can the 4RI get
                    `lost'?
                    How can A.P. Hill come up out of nowhere on Burnside's left? I
                    think
                    a serious argument can be made that the elevation information is
                    more
                    important than the ground cover information (woods vs. corn vs.
                    clover, etc.). But ground cover maps are more aesthetically
                    pleasing
                    to look at and readers are drawn to them.

                    The obvious solution to the `busying-up' effect of contour lines
                    is to
                    use contours of greater intervals: 50 ft. instead of 20 ft. or
                    whatever. Curiously, the version of the Parks and History
                    Association
                    map sold at the Antietam bookstore is plenty large for contour
                    makings, but they are nonetheless omitted. I think somehow the
                    authors
                    of these maps have simply decided that elevation markings are not
                    necessary. This is why the Cope maps are far more useful than any
                    of
                    these others.

                    TRL

                    --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "G E Mayers" <gerry1952@...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > Dear Todd,
                    >
                    > IIRC Murfin used the Cope maps for his book....
                    >
                    > Yr. Obt. Svt.
                    > G E "Gerry" Mayers
                    >
                    > To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even
                    > on one's mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the
                    > Union, a passport to any foreign country, and a benediction
                    > from
                    > the Almighty God. --Anonymous
                    > ----- Original Message -----
                    > From: "T. R. Livesey" <tlivesey@...>
                    > To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
                    > Sent: Wednesday, May 30, 2007 12:40 PM
                    > Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Question
                    >
                    >
                    > I agree with Gerry: Murfin's maps are better than Sears'.
                    > Priest's
                    > maps are better than Sears'.
                    >
                    > The Carman-Cope "Atlas of the battlefield of Antietam", of
                    > course, is
                    > in a class of its own.
                    >
                    > TRL
                    >

                    >
                  • Thomas Clemens
                    TR, I couldn t agree more! The P&H map is the base map of the Carman/Cope maps, but they do indeed leave out the elevation markings. Great if you want to
                    Message 9 of 30 , May 30, 2007
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                      TR,
                      I couldn't agree more! The P&H map is the base map of the Carman/Cope maps, but they do indeed leave out the elevation markings. Great if you want to know crops types, fences, etc. but not good for understanding the battle. Preist used this map, but the whole thing never appears in the book so if you don't know the field to begin with, you'll be lost like a hiccup in a hurricane. Also he used some odd symbols for artillery, etc.
                      Tom Clemen

                      Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
                      Professor of History
                      Hagerstown Community College

                      s
                      >>> "T. R. Livesey" <tlivesey@...> 05/30/07 1:36 PM >>>

                      Gerry,

                      In Murfin's introduction, he states that the maps are the work of
                      James D. Bowlby, the result of 10 years of field surveys, a revision
                      of the Cope maps. The base map looks a lot like the Cope maps, but
                      use terrain symbols much more suitable for smaller-scale reproduction.
                      There are a few differences: one shows a corn field where the other
                      shows clover, etc. Inexplicably, the elevation contour lines have
                      been removed in Murphin's, seriously compromising their usefulness.

                      Priest uses the "Parks and History Association" map as his base, which
                      I think more closely follows the Cope maps. It uses symbols that are
                      similar, but not identical to the Cope maps. I don't know the history
                      of this map. It too lacks elevation markings.

                      From my experience, including elevation markings is always a
                      challenge, especially if you want to zoom out and show a broader
                      expanse of area. The downside, of course, is that you end up with
                      maps that look like the way Sears' text reads: there is no way to
                      really understand how the terrain affects the situation. For example,
                      in the maps of all three of these books, the reader cannot appreciate
                      the situation in the 40 acre cornfield: how can the 4RI get `lost'?
                      How can A.P. Hill come up out of nowhere on Burnside's left? I think
                      a serious argument can be made that the elevation information is more
                      important than the ground cover information (woods vs. corn vs.
                      clover, etc.). But ground cover maps are more aesthetically pleasing
                      to look at and readers are drawn to them.

                      The obvious solution to the `busying-up' effect of contour lines is to
                      use contours of greater intervals: 50 ft. instead of 20 ft. or
                      whatever. Curiously, the version of the Parks and History Association
                      map sold at the Antietam bookstore is plenty large for contour
                      makings, but they are nonetheless omitted. I think somehow the authors
                      of these maps have simply decided that elevation markings are not
                      necessary. This is why the Cope maps are far more useful than any of
                      these others.

                      TRL

                      --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "G E Mayers" <gerry1952@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Dear Todd,
                      >
                      > IIRC Murfin used the Cope maps for his book....
                      >
                      > Yr. Obt. Svt.
                      > G E "Gerry" Mayers
                      >
                      > To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even
                      > on one's mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the
                      > Union, a passport to any foreign country, and a benediction from
                      > the Almighty God. --Anonymous
                      > ----- Original Message -----
                      > From: "T. R. Livesey" <tlivesey@...>
                      > To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
                      > Sent: Wednesday, May 30, 2007 12:40 PM
                      > Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Question
                      >
                      >
                      > I agree with Gerry: Murfin's maps are better than Sears'.
                      > Priest's
                      > maps are better than Sears'.
                      >
                      > The Carman-Cope "Atlas of the battlefield of Antietam", of
                      > course, is
                      > in a class of its own.
                      >
                      > TRL
                      >

                      >





                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • James W. Durney
                      ... example, ... appreciate ... think ... more ... I think Anitetam cannot be understood w/o elevation markings. My first chance to walk the battlefield was a
                      Message 10 of 30 , May 30, 2007
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                        --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "T. R. Livesey" <tlivesey@...>
                        wrote:
                        >
                        > From my experience, including elevation markings is always a
                        > challenge, especially if you want to zoom out and show a broader
                        > expanse of area. The downside, of course, is that you end up with
                        > maps that look like the way Sears' text reads: there is no way to
                        > really understand how the terrain affects the situation. For
                        example,
                        > in the maps of all three of these books, the reader cannot
                        appreciate
                        > the situation in the 40 acre cornfield: how can the 4RI get `lost'?
                        > How can A.P. Hill come up out of nowhere on Burnside's left? I
                        think
                        > a serious argument can be made that the elevation information is
                        more
                        > important than the ground cover information (woods vs. corn vs.
                        > clover, etc.).


                        I think Anitetam cannot be understood w/o elevation markings. My
                        first chance to walk the battlefield was a revelation that I will
                        never forget. Neither Sears, Priest or Harsh had told me how much
                        elevation impacts the battle.

                        James
                      • T. R. Livesey
                        Murfin s maps also suffer somewhat from the problem that there is no image of the whole battlefield, making orientation difficult. Since I owned a copy of the
                        Message 11 of 30 , May 30, 2007
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                          Murfin's maps also suffer somewhat from the problem that there is no
                          image of the whole battlefield, making orientation difficult. Since I
                          owned a copy of the Parks and History Association map before I read
                          any of these books, I never really had a problem with orientation.

                          While it is certainly not the 'best' book (at least not for an overall
                          introduction to the battle), Luvaas & Nelson's "US Army War College
                          Guide to the Battle of Antietam" is worthy of mention, particularly
                          for actually visiting the battlefield and related sites at S Mountain
                          and Harper's Ferry. Definitely the best driving directions for getting
                          around S Mountain. Whenever I take visitor's to the battlefield, I
                          always take the route that they suggest: start at the Pry House, then
                          to the Keedysville road, over the little Antietam, past Pry's Mill,
                          over the upper bridge, down the Smoketown road into the east woods.
                          Not only does it take you past fields, roads and houses that look like
                          they haven't changed much since 1862, but it also gives a good sense
                          the kind of ground in the area. And, there will be no other tourists
                          entering the battlefield from that route. At first glance their maps
                          are somewhat primitive, but they do show contour lines, which in my
                          opinion makes them far more useful than the maps in the other three.
                          Cute symbols for corn and clover and stubble are cool but they just
                          don't work when the map is reduced to book page size. Also
                          indispensable if you are using the map while visiting the battlefield
                          is the inclusion of modern features (e.g. roads, structures and tour
                          stops) so that you can figure out where you are in relation to the
                          historical features. None of the big three's maps show modern
                          features, but the Luvaas & Nelson maps do. It's too bad that Luvaas &
                          Nelson only did little map segments at Antietam to illustrate the
                          portions of ground they study instead of producing a whole battlefield
                          map because I think they had the right idea given the limitations of
                          maps that appear in a book. Their map of the Harper's Ferry area is great.

                          TRL

                          --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas Clemens" <clemenst@...>
                          wrote:
                          >
                          > TR,
                          > I couldn't agree more! The P&H map is the base map of the
                          Carman/Cope maps, but they do indeed leave out the elevation markings.
                          Great if you want to know crops types, fences, etc. but not good for
                          understanding the battle. Preist used this map, but the whole thing
                          never appears in the book so if you don't know the field to begin
                          with, you'll be lost like a hiccup in a hurricane. Also he used some
                          odd symbols for artillery, etc.
                          > Tom Clemen
                          >
                          > Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
                          > Professor of History
                          > Hagerstown Community College
                          >
                          > s
                          > >>> "T. R. Livesey" <tlivesey@...> 05/30/07 1:36 PM >>>
                          >
                          > Gerry,
                          >
                          > In Murfin's introduction, he states that the maps are the work of
                          > James D. Bowlby, the result of 10 years of field surveys, a revision
                          > of the Cope maps. The base map looks a lot like the Cope maps, but
                          > use terrain symbols much more suitable for smaller-scale reproduction.
                          > There are a few differences: one shows a corn field where the other
                          > shows clover, etc. Inexplicably, the elevation contour lines have
                          > been removed in Murphin's, seriously compromising their usefulness.
                          >
                          > Priest uses the "Parks and History Association" map as his base, which
                          > I think more closely follows the Cope maps. It uses symbols that are
                          > similar, but not identical to the Cope maps. I don't know the history
                          > of this map. It too lacks elevation markings.
                          >
                          > From my experience, including elevation markings is always a
                          > challenge, especially if you want to zoom out and show a broader
                          > expanse of area. The downside, of course, is that you end up with
                          > maps that look like the way Sears' text reads: there is no way to
                          > really understand how the terrain affects the situation. For example,
                          > in the maps of all three of these books, the reader cannot appreciate
                          > the situation in the 40 acre cornfield: how can the 4RI get `lost'?
                          > How can A.P. Hill come up out of nowhere on Burnside's left? I think
                          > a serious argument can be made that the elevation information is more
                          > important than the ground cover information (woods vs. corn vs.
                          > clover, etc.). But ground cover maps are more aesthetically pleasing
                          > to look at and readers are drawn to them.
                          >
                          > The obvious solution to the `busying-up' effect of contour lines is to
                          > use contours of greater intervals: 50 ft. instead of 20 ft. or
                          > whatever. Curiously, the version of the Parks and History Association
                          > map sold at the Antietam bookstore is plenty large for contour
                          > makings, but they are nonetheless omitted. I think somehow the authors
                          > of these maps have simply decided that elevation markings are not
                          > necessary. This is why the Cope maps are far more useful than any of
                          > these others.
                          >
                          > TRL
                          >
                        • Stephen Recker
                          Anyone know anything about this fellow? Thanks. Stephen Recker
                          Message 12 of 30 , Jun 1, 2007
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                            Anyone know anything about this fellow? Thanks.

                            Stephen Recker
                          • G E Mayers
                            Stephen, What other information do you have about his unit? Yr. Obt. Svt. G E Gerry Mayers To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even on
                            Message 13 of 30 , Jun 1, 2007
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                              Stephen,

                              What other information do you have about his unit?

                              Yr. Obt. Svt.
                              G E "Gerry" Mayers

                              To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even
                              on one's mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the
                              Union, a passport to any foreign country, and a benediction from
                              the Almighty God. --Anonymous
                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: "Stephen Recker" <recker@...>
                              To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
                              Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 1:41 PM
                              Subject: [TalkAntietam] Lt. March of the 32nd MA


                              > Anyone know anything about this fellow? Thanks.
                              >
                              > Stephen Recker
                              >
                              >
                            • Stephen Recker
                              I seem to remember hearing/reading somewhere that Stonewall Jackson, some time around the morning of September 15th, wrote Lee from Harper s Ferry that, I
                              Message 14 of 30 , Jun 1, 2007
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                                I seem to remember hearing/reading somewhere that Stonewall Jackson,
                                some time around the morning of September 15th, wrote Lee from Harper's
                                Ferry that, "I will meet you in Sharpsburg". Can't find the cite.
                                Actually can only find Stonewall asking Lee where he should go after
                                the fall of HF. Any thoughts? Thanks.

                                Stephen Recker
                              • Thomas Clemens
                                Steve, 1st lt. James E. March mustered in with te regiment, mustered out 10/27/1864 on expiration of service, was recommissioned from civil life 12/1/1864.
                                Message 15 of 30 , Jun 2, 2007
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                                  Steve,
                                  1st lt. James E. March mustered in with te regiment, mustered out
                                  10/27/1864 on expiration of service, was "recommissioned from civil
                                  life" 12/1/1864. Offical Army Register, Vol. I, p. 200.

                                  Tom Clemens


                                  Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
                                  Professor of History
                                  Hagerstown Community College


                                  >>> "G E Mayers" <gerry1952@...> 06/01/07 1:48 PM >>>
                                  Stephen,

                                  What other information do you have about his unit?

                                  Yr. Obt. Svt.
                                  G E "Gerry" Mayers

                                  To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even
                                  on one's mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the
                                  Union, a passport to any foreign country, and a benediction from
                                  the Almighty God. --Anonymous
                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  From: "Stephen Recker" <recker@...>
                                  To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
                                  Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 1:41 PM
                                  Subject: [TalkAntietam] Lt. March of the 32nd MA


                                  > Anyone know anything about this fellow? Thanks.
                                  >
                                  > Stephen Recker
                                  >
                                  >
                                • Thomas Clemens
                                  Steve, The only message recorded as sent by Jackson to Lee on the 15th was the announcement of the surrender of HF. In that message, OR, Vol. 19, pt. 1, p.
                                  Message 16 of 30 , Jun 2, 2007
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                                    Steve,
                                    The only message recorded as sent by Jackson to Lee on the 15th was the
                                    announcement of the surrender of HF. In that message, OR, Vol. 19, pt.
                                    1, p. 951, he asks Lee where to send his troops. If there is something
                                    else I don't know of it, and neither does Joe Harsh, who discusses it in
                                    Sounding the Shallows, Chap. 8, section L.


                                    Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
                                    Professor of History
                                    Hagerstown Community College


                                    >>> Stephen Recker <recker@...> 06/01/07 6:34 PM >>>
                                    I seem to remember hearing/reading somewhere that Stonewall Jackson,
                                    some time around the morning of September 15th, wrote Lee from Harper's
                                    Ferry that, "I will meet you in Sharpsburg". Can't find the cite.
                                    Actually can only find Stonewall asking Lee where he should go after
                                    the fall of HF. Any thoughts? Thanks.

                                    Stephen Recker
                                  • joseph_pierro
                                    Having just joined the group, I realize I m coming into this discussion a tad late (so please forgive). For anyone interested in a broad study of the entire
                                    Message 17 of 30 , Jun 23, 2007
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                                      Having just joined the group, I realize I'm coming into this
                                      discussion a tad late (so please forgive).

                                      For anyone interested in a broad study of the entire campaign at the
                                      operational level, I'd recommend Harsh as a good first start.

                                      If the tactical mechanics of Antietam itself are more your concern,
                                      I'd recommend either Murfin or Sears.

                                      Mike Priest's books contain a good deal of "color" from soldiers in
                                      the ranks; his "big picture" can be a bit difficult to follow if you
                                      are not already well versed on the basics of the battle.

                                      The Ezra Carman manuscript is incredibly detailed (imagine Sears or
                                      Murfin, but on a regimental level-focus instead of brigade or
                                      division). Wonderful for later study, but not a place I would
                                      recommend someone to start their investigation. (It's similar in
                                      that regard to Bigelow's "Campaign of Chancellorsville," if you are
                                      familiar with that massive study.)

                                      As for maps, Murfin's are quite good, and are baszed off of the
                                      original Carman Atlas of Antietam. It's long out of print, but the
                                      Library of Congress was recently scanned it in in its entirety as
                                      part of its "American Memory" digital archive. I don;t have the link
                                      to hand -- I'm writing this from the road-- but if you search Carman
                                      and Antietam in American Memory, you'll get teh link for the Atlas.
                                      Best of all, the map reading software--which you can download for
                                      free--allows you to zoom as tight as you might want in crystal clear
                                      resolution).


                                      -- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "G E Mayers" <gerry1952@...>
                                      wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Dear Stephen,
                                      >
                                      > Your point about Harsh is definitely well taken.
                                      >
                                      > However, Sears' maps are not as good as those in Murfin's Gleam
                                      > of Bayonets.
                                      >
                                      > Yr. Obt. Svt.
                                      > G E "Gerry" Mayers
                                      >
                                      > To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even
                                      > on one's mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the
                                      > Union, a passport to any foreign country, and a benediction from
                                      > the Almighty God. --Anonymous
                                      > ----- Original Message -----
                                      > From: "Phen62" <phen@...>
                                      > To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
                                      > Sent: Tuesday, May 29, 2007 10:18 PM
                                      > Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Question
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Having read Sears, as much as Priet as I could wade through, and
                                      > Harsh, I favor Harsh. I think if you are going to read Harsh it
                                      > is
                                      > helpful to Read Confederate Tide Rising as well as Taken at the
                                      > Flood.
                                      > I believe he meant them to be one work. Of all the books
                                      > mentioned,
                                      > Sears has by far the best maps, not a small consideration.
                                      >
                                      > Stephen
                                      >
                                    • Thomas Clemens
                                      A friend on another list pointed out that Isaac Wistar s memoirs mention going to Keedysville after he was wounded and being treated at a shopkeeper s house
                                      Message 18 of 30 , Oct 6, 2007
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                                        A friend on another list pointed out that Isaac Wistar's memoirs mention
                                        going to Keedysville after he was wounded and being treated at a
                                        shopkeeper's house where other 71st PA officers were also treated. The
                                        shopkeeper, accordnig to Wistar, was killed by a stray shot. has anyone
                                        ever heard this story before? It is not in O.T. Reilly's book, or other
                                        accounts I have seen. Any data?


                                        Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
                                        Professor of History
                                        Hagerstown Community College
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