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RE: [TalkAntietam] South Mountain

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  • Harry Smeltzer
    Just east of the Dahlgren Chapel there s a road that takes you up to a good spot. Tom Clemens can help you with the road name.and will warn you of the dangers
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 12, 2007
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      Just east of the Dahlgren Chapel there's a road that takes you up to a good
      spot. Tom Clemens can help you with the road name.and will warn you of the
      dangers of trying to get a tour bus up there!



      Harry



      -----Original Message-----
      From: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com] On
      Behalf Of Stephen Recker
      Sent: Thursday, April 12, 2007 5:42 PM
      To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [TalkAntietam] South Mountain



      Where is the best place to interpret the Turner's Gap action north of
      the National Pike? I'm talking about George Gordon Meade. I'm looking
      for a modern road name. Thanks.

      Stephen





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Adam Zimmerli
      I m working on my Master s thesis, which (in part) looks at Antietam and Gettysburg in terms of entrepreneurs. I ve got a few copied pages out of a Wilmer
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 13, 2007
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        I'm working on my Master's thesis, which (in part) looks at Antietam
        and Gettysburg in terms of entrepreneurs.

        I've got a few copied pages out of a Wilmer Mumma book that talks
        about O.T. Reilly. I'll need to re-read them to see if it's the one
        you're talking about.

        BTW, when I was out in the area last, Ted Alexander said that if
        anyone knew much about these two guys (Reilly and Burgan), it'd be
        you, Stephen.

        Any more "pointing me in the right direction" is much appreciated.

        Adam

        --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, Stephen Recker <recker@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > One of Wilmer Mumma's books has a funny story about the ongoing
        feud
        > between O.T. Reilly and martin Burgan.
        >
        > Why are you researching this. Are you doing a book?
        >
        > Stephen
        >
        > BTW, Mumma's Antietam, the Aftermath has a short story about Simon
        and
        > his trip to the battlefield. Interesting in that it mentions, but
        > doesn't give a date for the dip.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > On Sunday, April 8, 2007, at 10:02 AM, Adam Zimmerli wrote:
        >
        > > Also, aside from their description in Kathleen
        > > Ernst's "Too Afraid to Cry," are there stories of early tour
        guides?
        >
      • Thomas Clemens
        There was also a fellow from Keedysville who was a long-time battlefield guide. I think the name was David Wyand. I will check into this when I return home.
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 14, 2007
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          There was also a fellow from Keedysville who was a long-time battlefield guide. I think the name was David Wyand. I will check into this when I return home.

          Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
          Professor of History
          Hagerstown Community College


          >>> "Adam Zimmerli" <azimmerli@...> 04/13/07 10:35 AM >>>
          I'm working on my Master's thesis, which (in part) looks at Antietam
          and Gettysburg in terms of entrepreneurs.

          I've got a few copied pages out of a Wilmer Mumma book that talks
          about O.T. Reilly. I'll need to re-read them to see if it's the one
          you're talking about.

          BTW, when I was out in the area last, Ted Alexander said that if
          anyone knew much about these two guys (Reilly and Burgan), it'd be
          you, Stephen.

          Any more "pointing me in the right direction" is much appreciated.

          Adam

          --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, Stephen Recker <recker@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > One of Wilmer Mumma's books has a funny story about the ongoing
          feud
          > between O.T. Reilly and martin Burgan.
          >
          > Why are you researching this. Are you doing a book?
          >
          > Stephen
          >
          > BTW, Mumma's Antietam, the Aftermath has a short story about Simon
          and
          > his trip to the battlefield. Interesting in that it mentions, but
          > doesn't give a date for the dip.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > On Sunday, April 8, 2007, at 10:02 AM, Adam Zimmerli wrote:
          >
          > > Also, aside from their description in Kathleen
          > > Ernst's "Too Afraid to Cry," are there stories of early tour
          guides?
          >
        • Stephen Recker
          Adam, Why don t you contact me offline and we ll chat. Cheers, Stephen Recker Antietam Battlefield Guides P.O. Box 705 Sharpsburg, MD 21782 240-217-3664
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 24, 2007
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            Adam,

            Why don't you contact me offline and we'll chat.

            Cheers,
            Stephen Recker
            Antietam Battlefield Guides

            P.O. Box 705
            Sharpsburg, MD 21782
            240-217-3664
            800-417-9596

            http://www.virtualantietam.com
            http://www.virtualgettysburg.com
            http://www.anothersoftwaremiracle.com



            On Sunday, April 8, 2007, at 10:02 AM, Adam Zimmerli wrote:

            > Hello, all.
            > I'm new to the group, but I've got a question:
            >
            > I'm looking for early (1862-1930's or so) entrepreneurs in the
            > Sharpsburg area who dealt specifically with the battlefield and
            > turning a buck off it. I know about O.T. Reilly's souvenir shop,
            > guidebook, and tours, and about Martin Burgan's guidebook. Aside from
            > the building that was on the Dunker Church foundation and the snack
            > shack near Bloody Lane, were there any other souvenir shops or the
            > like on the field? Also, aside from their description in Kathleen
            > Ernst's "Too Afraid to Cry," are there stories of early tour guides?
            > How about really BAD tour guides? (Akin to one discussed in the
            > Gettysburg Admin. History whose tours included a description of
            > Little Round Top as placed there by God's own hand solely so that the
            > Union Army might have a position from which to drive the rebels from
            > the field.)
            >
            > I imagine tour guides and souvenir shops were fairly small and part-
            > time jobs, mostly farmers who had a little downtime a few relics
            > they'd picked up on their property. I read Trowbridge's description
            > of his tour in 1867, and he hired a guide from Keedysville. Am I
            > right, or am I missing something?
            >
            > Finally, are there any good accounts of just what Lincoln actually
            > did in the Sharpsburg area? I guess he was touring the battlefield
            > (when he wasn't busy chewing out Little Mac), but I can't seem to
            > find any good accounts. Then again, I'm not too much of a Lincoln
            > historian, so I'm open to suggestions.
            >
            > Thanks!
            >
            > Adam Zimmerli
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Thomas Clemens
            Steve, uncle Davy Wyand in Keedsyville was a long-time guide. He might be the fellow referred to in the message. Thomas G. Clemens D.A. Professor of History
            Message 5 of 9 , Oct 25, 2007
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              Steve,
              "uncle Davy" Wyand in Keedsyville was a long-time guide. He might be
              the fellow referred to in the message.


              Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
              Professor of History
              Hagerstown Community College
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