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Re: [TalkAntietam] corn

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  • Bill & Glenna Jo Christen
    ... TR, From what I understand mature corn could range from five to eight feet tall in the mid-1860s...depending on variety, growing conditions, etc. Not all
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 30 4:36 PM
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      TR Livesey wrote:

      > I am still curious about the potential concealment a 19th century
      > Sharpsburg area cornfield might offer. Any idea about how far one
      > could see into such a cornfield?

      TR,

      From what I understand mature corn could range from five to eight feet tall in the
      mid-1860s...depending on variety, growing conditions, etc. Not all farmers planted
      in the evenly spaced mounds. I would suspect the flags and riffle with bayonets
      could be seen most of the time. If we were giving this a wargaming factor I would
      at a "shift" for partial concealment, but no modifier for protection. We did some
      filming in a tall crop of mounded corn in Michigan. It did obscure the soldiers
      from view once they were six feet into the corn.

      This sounds like a useful experimental anthropology problem for which enactors
      would be useful.

      Bill









      >
      > >
      > > oliverg25@... wrote:
      > >
      > > > Not So!
      > > > Once the corn is planted a horse never goes into the field.
      > >
      > > While researching the type of corn planting in the fields around Sharpsburg
      > > for the Antietam documentary it was determined that the area farmers used the
      > > "mounds spaced evenly apart" technique. That is, the "row's" were evenly
      > > spaced in all directions. This is thinner than today's typical row planting
      > > or what some farmer in pennsylvania may have done. The points made about the
      > > devastation due to the firing bear more weight on the amount of cover.
      > >
      > > Bill Christen
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/

      --
      gwjchris@...
      Visit our web site, "The Curiosity Shop"
      http://www.rust.net/~gwjchris/
    • TR Livesey
      Bill, Thanks - I think that is exactly what I was looking for. I would agree that I can t see corn offering protection; then again, I am only interested in
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 30 5:05 PM
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        Bill,

        Thanks - I think that is exactly what
        I was looking for.

        I would agree that I can't see corn
        offering protection; then again,
        I am only interested in concealment.

        Based on your comments - and other
        opinions offered - I will continue
        to assume that corn pretty much
        blocks line of sight. A little
        off topic, but of interest to
        me.

        TRL

        Bill & Glenna Jo Christen wrote:
        >
        > TR Livesey wrote:
        >
        > > I am still curious about the potential concealment a 19th century
        > > Sharpsburg area cornfield might offer. Any idea about how far one
        > > could see into such a cornfield?
        >
        > TR,
        >
        > >From what I understand mature corn could range from five to eight feet tall in the
        > mid-1860s...depending on variety, growing conditions, etc. Not all farmers planted
        > in the evenly spaced mounds. I would suspect the flags and riffle with bayonets
        > could be seen most of the time. If we were giving this a wargaming factor I would
        > at a "shift" for partial concealment, but no modifier for protection. We did some
        > filming in a tall crop of mounded corn in Michigan. It did obscure the soldiers
        > from view once they were six feet into the corn.
        >
        > This sounds like a useful experimental anthropology problem for which enactors
        > would be useful.
        >
        > Bill
        >
        > >
        > > >
        > > > oliverg25@... wrote:
        > > >
        > > > > Not So!
        > > > > Once the corn is planted a horse never goes into the field.
        > > >
        > > > While researching the type of corn planting in the fields around Sharpsburg
        > > > for the Antietam documentary it was determined that the area farmers used the
        > > > "mounds spaced evenly apart" technique. That is, the "row's" were evenly
        > > > spaced in all directions. This is thinner than today's typical row planting
        > > > or what some farmer in pennsylvania may have done. The points made about the
        > > > devastation due to the firing bear more weight on the amount of cover.
        > > >
        > > > Bill Christen
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        > --
        > gwjchris@...
        > Visit our web site, "The Curiosity Shop"
        > http://www.rust.net/~gwjchris/
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
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