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Re: [TalkAntietam] Artillery Weekend (more followup)

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  • Thomas Clemens
    Yes that is pretty much it. The Misfire Drill that the NPS uses is based on the one in French, Barry & Hunt s Artillery Drill 1860. It was not unusual in the
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 13 6:38 PM
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      Yes that is pretty much it. The Misfire Drill that the NPS uses is
      based on the one in French, Barry & Hunt's Artillery Drill 1860. It was
      not unusual in the 1860's, and the government issued 75 friction primers
      with every 50 rounds of ammo. This provided for practice firing,
      misfires, loss, etc.
      The current problem, and what we experienced Saturday and Sunday several
      times, is that the repro primers are not made like the originals, and
      when they fail, they get stuck in the vent. That creates a much more
      dangerous situation because the cannoneer must stay in there near the
      vent longer to clear it, and must often drive the old primer tube down
      into the cartridge, making it into a projectile. Not good. If the
      primer is still hot enough, it can even cause the gun to prematurely
      discharge.
      I say all of this because I wish someone would accurately reproduce the
      original primer, which when it failed could be easily removed from the
      vent. As always, the question is money, but for safety reasons, many
      artillery enthusiasts, and more importantly the NPS, would bless the
      name of someone who could do it. My two cents worth, sorry about the
      rant.
      Tom C



      Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
      Professor of History
      Hagerstown Community College
    • Stephen Recker
      I was at a book store this weekend and read in a book about a regiment in a brigade (Union) approaching the Sunken Road. The brigade, I believe it was in
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 5, 2006
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        I was at a book store this weekend and read in a book about a regiment
        in a brigade (Union) approaching the Sunken Road. The brigade, I
        believe it was in French's Division, started getting fire from the rear
        from another Union brigade in its division. They moved to the side and
        the friendly fire stopped.

        I went back to buy the book, "War From the Inside", the story of the
        132nd PA, and read the book but can't find the friendly fire anecdote.
        I know I looked in a million books that day, but was pretty sure that
        was the book. Any ideas where that might've been I was looking? Thanks.

        Stephen
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