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Re: Article about Hoods Texans

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  • oliverg25@hotmail.com
    ... have been ... David; Precisely! I think someone else also said the cornfield had been trampled before Hood got there. So the corn, or what remained,
    Message 1 of 27 , Aug 27, 2001
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      --- In TalkAntietam@y..., "David Lutton" <dunkerch@c...> wrote:
      > Ollie,
      >
      > Exactly my point. At this point of the battle the cornfield would
      have been
      > defestated. Hence the corn would have been a non factor.
      >
      > David Lutton

      David;

      Precisely!

      I think someone else also said the cornfield had been trampled before
      Hood got there. So the corn, or what remained, provided very little
      cover.

      Ollie
    • TR Livesey
      Ollie, oliverg25@hotmail.com wrote: ... Hooker s account is unreliable. He makes it sound like he mowed down a whole regiment waiting hidden in
      Message 2 of 27 , Aug 27, 2001
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        Ollie,

        oliverg25@... wrote:
        <general snip>
        >
        > One thing you seem to have forgotten is that Hooker ordered the
        > cornfield to be raked with canister before any assult began. I don't
        > think there was much cover left by the time th texans got there
        >
        > Ollie

        Hooker's account is unreliable. He makes it sound like he mowed down
        a whole regiment waiting hidden in the cornfield. In fact, when
        the I corps moved out, there were no significant Confederates in
        the corn, they were in line south of it.

        Furthermore, I doubt that Hooker could have possibly irradicated an
        entire 30 acre cornfield, no matter how much canister he used.
        Anyway, we are interested here in the southern end of it.

        TRL
      • Oliver Gamble
        ... From: TR Livesey To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com Sent: Sunday, August 26, 2001 11:14 PM Subject: Re: [TalkAntietam] Article about Hoods Texans David, Corn
        Message 3 of 27 , Aug 27, 2001
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          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Sunday, August 26, 2001 11:14 PM
          Subject: Re: [TalkAntietam] Article about Hoods Texans

          David,

          Corn planting patterns were different in 1862, not nearly as
          dense, with rows being wide enough for a horse to move between.
           
          Not So!
          Once the corn is planted a horse never goes into the field. Plowing and planting is usually done with a team of horses, not one.
           
          Amish farmers in PA still use horses and mules and their rows are tighter than those of farmers using tractors.
           
           O.G.
        • Tom Clemens
          In the 19th Century, they used hills of corn, and check-row pattern allowed a lot of traffic in the cornfields. Think of it and a checkerboard where every
          Message 4 of 27 , Aug 27, 2001
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            In the 19th Century, they used hills of corn, and check-row pattern allowed a
            lot of traffic in the cornfields. Think of it and a checkerboard where every
            corner is a hill of corn. It was usually hand planted, not with horses and
            machine planters. Bill Christen knows much about it than I do, ask him.


            oliverg25@... wrote:

            > --- In TalkAntietam@y..., TR Livesey <westwood@e...> wrote:
            > > David,
            > >
            > > > Corn planting patterns were different in 1862, not nearly as
            > > dense, with rows being wide enough for a horse to move between.
            > > This would imply that the corn will have different degrees of
            > > concealment,
            >
            > Not So!
            > Once the corn is planted a horse never goes into the field. Plowing
            > and planting is usually done with a team of horses, not one. after
            > planting there is no need for a horse to go back into the field. Also
            > a horse does not damage the top soil as much as a tractor wheel
            >
            > Amish farmers in PA still use horses and mules and their rows are
            > tighter than those of farmers using tractors. Their fields are so
            > tight you can not look down a row.
            >
            > This might come through twice when Hotmail gets its act together.
            >
            > O.G.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          • Tom Clemens
            Squire Boone.
            Message 5 of 27 , Aug 27, 2001
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              Squire Boone.

              NJ Rebel wrote:

              > Your comment about Dan'l Boone is well taken. BTW, what was the
              > name of Dan'l's brother?
              >
              > Your humble servant,
              > Gerry Mayers
              > Co. B, "Tom Green Rifles",
              > Fourth Regiment, Texas Volunteer Infantry
              >
              > "I know of no fitter resting-place for a soldier than the field
              > on which he has nobly laid down his life." --General Robert
              > Edward Lee
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            • NJ Rebel
              Group; If you have a Preview option on your email program, I recommend you use it. It will allow you to see what attachments are attached before you open the
              Message 6 of 27 , Apr 28, 2002
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                Group;

                If you have a Preview option on your email program, I recommend
                you use it. It will allow you to see what attachments are
                attached before you open the email! If you see anything ending
                with .pif or .bat as an attachment or .exe, DELETE it
                immediately! (Many viruses come with either of the three
                extensions.)

                Also, run Trend Micro Antivirus web based scanning, Norton Anti
                Virus or any similar program to locate any virus infections you
                might have and then clean.

                The KLEZ-G variant worm virus has been running amuck in this
                group, and already caused one member to have his account delisted
                by the moderator.

                Your humble servant,
                Gerry Mayers
                Co. B, "Tom Green Rifles",
                Fourth Regiment, Texas Volunteer Infantry

                A Proud American by Birth, Southern by Choice!

                "I know of no fitter resting-place for a soldier than the field
                on which he has nobly laid down his life." --General Robert
                Edward Lee


                ----- Original Message -----
                From: <oliverg25@...>
                To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Monday, August 27, 2001 8:18 PM
                Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Article about Hoods Texans


                > --- In TalkAntietam@y..., TR Livesey <westwood@e...> wrote:
                > > David,
                > >
                > > > Corn planting patterns were different in 1862, not nearly
                as
                > > dense, with rows being wide enough for a horse to move
                between.
                > > This would imply that the corn will have different degrees of
                > > concealment,
                >
                > Not So!
                > Once the corn is planted a horse never goes into the field.
                Plowing
                > and planting is usually done with a team of horses, not one.
                after
                > planting there is no need for a horse to go back into the
                field. Also
                > a horse does not damage the top soil as much as a tractor wheel
                >
                > Amish farmers in PA still use horses and mules and their rows
                are
                > tighter than those of farmers using tractors. Their fields are
                so
                > tight you can not look down a row.
                >
                > This might come through twice when Hotmail gets its act
                together.
                >
                > O.G.
                >
                >
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