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[TalkAntietam] Re: Coddington of Antietam

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  • Thomas Clemens
    Well I will try not to belabor this issue. Carman was a veteran of th battle, commanding the 13th New Jersey, 12th Corps. He immediately became interested in
    Message 1 of 117 , Mar 1, 2006
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      Well I will try not to belabor this issue.
      Carman was a veteran of th battle, commanding the 13th New Jersey, 12th
      Corps. He immediately became interested in doing a map and writing a
      history, and spent time talkingto locals while the army was there. He
      was on the Board of the Nat'l. Cemetery, and an active amatuer historian
      for some years after the war. he wrote about all sorts of campaigns,
      and not just the ones he was in. He was named to the Antietam
      Battlefield Board in 1892, and served as "historical expert" and was
      paid to produce a map, a "pamphlet" explaining th battle, lay out roads
      and place monuments, and provide the text for the cast iron tablets.
      The battlefield is pretty much the way he designed it to be.
      His tablets obviously are there, and his map turned into 14
      time-sequenced maps with great detail. They were produced in assistance
      with Col. Cope, who worked with Bachelder at Gettysburg.
      His "pamphlet" turned into an 1,800 page narrative of the campaign from
      the troubles in MD in 1861 through Oct. of 1862. It is in the Library
      Congress and is the most detailed study of the campaign and the detail
      that exists.
      What I am doing is editing his manuscript, which means mostly trying
      identify sources he used, since he seldom footnoted, and confirm
      details, point out errors, etc. I did the first seven chapters for my
      doctoral dissertation, and that wound up being around 500 typed pages.
      There are 22 more chapters yet to do. I have a typescript of the whole
      document, not just he battle chapters which were published by Sid Meirs.

      Early on in his work he relied heavily on the OR's, Battles and
      Leaders, and a lot of other published sources. as he got to the battle
      he began to rely on the letters solicited by the Battlefield Board
      beginning in 1890, and going through the early years of the Twentieth
      Century. This wasa huge stumbling block, because I could not continue
      editing with compiling all these letters into a searchable system.
      These letters exist in the LOC, NYPL, and mostly in the Nat'l. Archives
      Antietam Studies files. So far I have a folder for every brigade in
      both armies and have copied all letters, memos, interviews, pertaining
      to the commands in those brigades into those folders. To date, I have a
      pretty good handle on the LOC and NYPL stuff, and am less than half way
      through the NA letters, and have cataloged over 800 letters, etc.
      Carman did frequently meet veterans who returned to the field and kept
      memos of their comments, and even arranged for some people to have
      expenses covered to come meet with him. Ther are also a huge number of
      handdrawn and marked up pre-printed maps. When I have all of these
      documents in a usable system then I will return to editing the
      manuscript. If I live long enough.
      When I get this wrapped up I will ask for any Carman Papers out there
      that are not in my master file. Some just came to light last year ar
      Drew Univ. when the correspondence with the officer who authenticated SO
      191 came to light.
      I am not very familiar withte Bachelder stuff, I know it is letters
      from participants, published etc., so will reserve judgment about it. I
      asked Scott Hartwig about Carman one time, as you proposed, ie. was he
      the Bachelder of Antietam? Scott paused a moment and said he thought
      Bachelder was the Carman of Gettysburg. :-)
      Sorry to take so long with this, but as you can deduce, it is near and
      dear to my heart. I have no recollection of any specific signal corps
      stuff, but will keep an eye out for it. Carman was mostly interested
      data for the tablets and maps, ie. where were the troops and how placed,
      etc. But there may be references to signal stuff that I do not recall
      off-hand, or have not yet seen.


      Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
      Professor of History
      Hagerstown Community College



      >>> flagflop@... 3/1/2006 8:50:52 AM >>>


      Tom,

      I certainly cannot take issue with the view that "the Coddington of
      Antietam" has yet to emerge, nor have I gotten into Scott Hartwig's
      work. And, for that matter, haven't yet picked up (from recent entry
      into this group) what you are doing with the Carman material (and,
      when
      you refer to his manuscript, whether you are referring specifically to
      his manuscript history of the campaign). But I do have a question for
      you, which might bring me up to speed quickly.

      Before there emerged a Coddington, there was a Bachelder. Can you
      "size
      up" what Carman (and the Carman papers at LoC) represents for
      Antietam,
      by comparison with Col. Bachelder for Gettysburg--for example, the
      breadth of his correspondence, the duration of his involvement, the
      depth of detail? Just a gross comparison. My inference is that it is
      less. My interest is narrowly centered on telecommunications, so I am
      always interested in "new" information (the older the better), but
      that
      interest was not high in contemporary priorities, which tended to
      concentrate on the combat arms. To put the question another way, is
      the
      Carman material such that it might yield three volumes for
      Morninghside?
      (Or, to really betray my interest, "did he ever ask questions or
      receive
      information about the signal presence?")




      without its flaws, but provided the basis for
      > Murfin's work, and Carman had access to Gould's papers, which
      provided
      > the sources for a lot of Sears' work. Harsh of course used it
      > extensively, as does Hartwig. Whatever editing I do will not add
      much
      > to Carman, but more explain how and why he wrote what he did, as
      much
      as
      > it can be ascertained from this point in time.
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >











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    • NJ Rebel
      Tom, Thanks! Yr. Obt. Svt. G E Gerry Mayers ....the powers granted under the Constitution, being derived from the people of the United States, may be
      Message 117 of 117 , Mar 2, 2006
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        Tom,

        Thanks!

        Yr. Obt. Svt.
        G E "Gerry" Mayers

        "....the powers granted under the Constitution, being derived from the
        people of the United States, may be resumed by them, whenever the same
        shall be perverted to their injury or oppression;.."
        Act of State of Virginia adopting the Federal Constitution, 26 June
        1788

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Thomas Clemens" <clemenst@...>
        To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Thursday, March 02, 2006 12:24 PM
        Subject: Re: [TalkAntietam] Re: Coddington of Antietam


        > No Gerry, strother was no help in that direction, and his account is
        > pretty well known. Strother does verify a Carman sotry about
        > McClellan's headquarters being located in the German Reformed Church
        > in
        > Keedysville from Sept. 15 to the afternoon of the 16. This is the
        > church that is pictured in B&L, and although remodeled i nthe
        > 1890's,
        > still stands today. (I went to Ash Wednesday service there last
        > night)
        > One of their antebellum pastors was Rev. Robert Douglas, father of
        > henry
        > Kyd Douglas.
        > Actually Ethan and I discussed Strother's assertion that McClellan
        > moved his headquarters from the Pry house on the afternoon of the
        > 17th.
        > Hhe concluded, and I agree, that MCClellan and his staff left the
        > house,
        > but hte army HQ was still there until later that night.
        >
        >
        > Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
        > Professor of History
        > Hagerstown Community College
        >
        >
        >
        >>>> gerry1952@... 3/1/2006 9:29:19 PM >>>
        >
        > Thanks Phil.
        >
        > What does "Porte Crayon" actually say in the article? That might be
        > good for Tom to see, especially if it backs up Carman's quote re Lee
        > and then Mac.
        >
        > Yr. Obt. Svt.
        > G E "Gerry" Mayers
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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