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RE: Weverton Pass

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  • Teej Smith
    Afternoon All, A couple of weeks ago a I picked up a very old book titled _ History of the Army of the Potomac _ written in 1893 by J. H. Stine. He spends some
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 30, 2001
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      Afternoon All,

      A couple of weeks ago a I picked up a very old book titled _ History of
      the Army of the Potomac _ written in 1893 by J. H. Stine. He spends some
      time talking about Weverton Pass, located near the Potomac, it afforded
      another approach to Maryland Heights. According to Stine had Mac
      advanced up this pass he could have reached Harper's Ferry in time to
      force McLaws to abandon the Heights and the sounds of a battle coming
      from this direction might have encouraged Miles to hold onto Harper's
      Ferry a bit longer. Thoughts anyone?

      Regards,
      Teej
    • James Rose
      Teej, I m looking at a map of the area (West Point Atlas) and I don t see a Weverton Pass. Crampton s Gap seems (according to the map) to be the quickest way
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 30, 2001
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        Teej,

        I'm looking at a map of the area (West Point Atlas) and I don't see a
        Weverton Pass. Crampton's Gap seems (according to the map) to be the
        quickest way into Pleasant Valley, and the valley being the best way to
        approach the heights. About Miles holding on, I doubt it. Miles knew
        that Franklin was coming, and that he was only a few miles away. He
        surrendered despite knowing that a relief force was close at hand. The
        only way I see it changing is if Franklin had relieved Miles before
        Jackson opened fire.

        Jim Rose

        Teej Smith wrote:

        > Afternoon All,
        >
        > A couple of weeks ago a I picked up a very old book titled _ History of
        > the Army of the Potomac _ written in 1893 by J. H. Stine. He spends some
        > time talking about Weverton Pass, located near the Potomac, it afforded
        > another approach to Maryland Heights. According to Stine had Mac
        > advanced up this pass he could have reached Harper's Ferry in time to
        > force McLaws to abandon the Heights and the sounds of a battle coming
        > from this direction might have encouraged Miles to hold onto Harper's
        > Ferry a bit longer. Thoughts anyone?
        >
        > Regards,
        > Teej
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Teej Smith
        ... Jim, Unfortunately the only description Stine gives is that it was a few miles below Harper s Ferry and that it was occupied by Wright s and Pryor s
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 30, 2001
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          James Rose wrote:
          >
          > Teej,
          >
          > I'm looking at a map of the area (West Point Atlas) and I don't see a
          > Weverton Pass. Crampton's Gap seems (according to the map) to be the
          > quickest way into Pleasant Valley, and the valley being the best way to
          > approach the heights. About Miles holding on, I doubt it. Miles knew
          > that Franklin was coming, and that he was only a few miles away. He
          > surrendered despite knowing that a relief force was close at hand. The
          > only way I see it changing is if Franklin had relieved Miles before
          > Jackson opened fire.
          >
          Jim,

          Unfortunately the only description Stine gives is that it was a
          few
          miles below Harper's Ferry and that it was occupied by Wright's and
          Pryor's Brigades of Anderson Div. Does that tell you where it might have
          been located? Is it known by another name?

          Teej
        • Tom Clemens
          Yes. Crap. Weverton Cliffs, and they are cliffs, were held by Wright s brigade and artillery on top of the cliffs, and part of Anderson s Division was
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 30, 2001
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            Yes. Crap. Weverton Cliffs, and they are cliffs, were held by Wright's brigade and
            artillery on top of the cliffs, and part of Anderson's Division was blocking the
            road. Hampton's cavalry was there too.

            Teej Smith wrote:

            > Afternoon All,
            >
            > A couple of weeks ago a I picked up a very old book titled _ History of
            > the Army of the Potomac _ written in 1893 by J. H. Stine. He spends some
            > time talking about Weverton Pass, located near the Potomac, it afforded
            > another approach to Maryland Heights. According to Stine had Mac
            > advanced up this pass he could have reached Harper's Ferry in time to
            > force McLaws to abandon the Heights and the sounds of a battle coming
            > from this direction might have encouraged Miles to hold onto Harper's
            > Ferry a bit longer. Thoughts anyone?
            >
            > Regards,
            > Teej
            >
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          • Tom Clemens
            Teej, Weverton is the town right on the Potomac downstream for Harpers Ferry a few miles. The cliffs are the southern end of South Mountain, analogous to
            Message 5 of 8 , Jun 30, 2001
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              Teej,
              Weverton is the town right on the Potomac downstream for Harpers Ferry a few
              miles. The cliffs are the southern end of South Mountain, analogous to
              Maryland Heights being the southern end of Elk Ridge. It may not be marked
              on the maps because nothing happened there. In fact the only person who
              thought something would happen there was Stuart. Oh well.


              Teej Smith wrote:

              > James Rose wrote:
              > >
              > > Teej,
              > >
              > > I'm looking at a map of the area (West Point Atlas) and I don't see a
              > > Weverton Pass. Crampton's Gap seems (according to the map) to be the
              > > quickest way into Pleasant Valley, and the valley being the best way to
              > > approach the heights. About Miles holding on, I doubt it. Miles knew
              > > that Franklin was coming, and that he was only a few miles away. He
              > > surrendered despite knowing that a relief force was close at hand. The
              > > only way I see it changing is if Franklin had relieved Miles before
              > > Jackson opened fire.
              > >
              > Jim,
              >
              > Unfortunately the only description Stine gives is that it was a
              > few
              > miles below Harper's Ferry and that it was occupied by Wright's and
              > Pryor's Brigades of Anderson Div. Does that tell you where it might have
              > been located? Is it known by another name?
              >
              > Teej
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            • Curt
              Weverton Cliffs is at the southern terminus of South Mtn., on the Potomac near Knoxville, Md. Short Hill Mtn., Va., is opposite in Loudoun Cty. It is
              Message 6 of 8 , Jun 30, 2001
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                Weverton Cliffs is at the southern terminus of South Mtn., on the
                Potomac near Knoxville, Md. Short Hill Mtn., Va., is opposite in
                Loudoun Cty. It is certainly an approach to Pleasant Valley and
                Maryland Heights, just as is Crampton's Gap to the north.

                Curt Johnson
                McLean, Va.

                James Rose wrote:
                >
                > Teej,
                >
                > I'm looking at a map of the area (West Point Atlas) and I don't see a
                > Weverton Pass.
                >
                > Jim Rose
                >
                > Teej Smith wrote:
                >
                > > Afternoon All,
                > >
                > > A couple of weeks ago a I picked up a very old book titled _ History of
                > > the Army of the Potomac _ written in 1893 by J. H. Stine. He spends some
                > > time talking about Weverton Pass, located near the Potomac, it afforded
                > > another approach to Maryland Heights.
              • James Rose
                Teej, I think that I see the pass. If I understand the map correctly (it s not labeled) Weverton is only a mile or so south of Crampton s Gap. The West Point
                Message 7 of 8 , Jul 1 4:09 AM
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                  Teej,

                  I think that I see the pass.  If I understand the map correctly (it's not labeled) Weverton is only a mile or so south of Crampton's Gap.  The West Point Atlas is not a great topographic map, so it is fairly hard to judge the advisability of trying to force that pass.  Crampton's Gap does look like a much better place to get through to the valley.

                  Jim Rose

                  Teej Smith wrote:
                  Jim,

                  Unfortunately the only description Stine gives is that it was a
                  few
                  miles below Harper's Ferry and that it was occupied by Wright's and
                  Pryor's Brigades of Anderson Div. Does that tell you where it might have
                  been located? Is it known by another name?

                  Teej

                • hjs21@aol.com
                  In a message dated 6/30/2001 8:04:12 PM Pacific Daylight Time, clemens@crosslink.net writes: C mon, Tom. Don t hold back. Harry
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jul 2 11:20 PM
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                    In a message dated 6/30/2001 8:04:12 PM Pacific Daylight Time,
                    clemens@... writes:

                    << Yes. Crap. >>

                    C'mon, Tom. Don't hold back.

                    Harry
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