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Re: [TalkAntietam] Re: Armistead

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  • bdowney@aotw.org
    Thanks Teej, This is just the kind of thing I needed. It clears up the apparent conflict nicely. Thanks also for popping this one to the surface Mr Croker.
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 20, 2005
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      Thanks Teej,

      This is just the kind of thing I needed. It clears up the apparent conflict nicely. Thanks
      also for popping this one to the surface Mr Croker.

      Brian

      To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
      From: "Teej Smith" <teej@...>
      Date sent: Mon, 20 Jun 2005 18:09:29 -0400
      Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Armistead was] Re: West Point @ Antietam
      Send reply to: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com

      > Brian,
      >
      > In his monograph titled "Trust in God and Fear Nothing" : Gen. Lewis A.
      > Armistead, CSA, Wayne Motts wrote, "Emboldened by his success at Second
      > Manassas, Lee launched an offensive into Maryland that culminated in the
      > Battle of Sharpsburg (Antietam to northerners), but here again, Armistead
      > saw limited action. In early September, while serving in the Confederate
      > division commanded by Major General Richard H. Anderson, Armistead was
      > appointed Provost Marshal of the Army of Northern Virginia. He served on
      > this assignment until September 26, 1862., and from all accounts, his
      > brigade remained with him as his guard for the task. Brought in at
      > Sharpsburg, his brigade arrived on the field on the morning of September 17,
      > but instead of joining their division near the sunken road were held back in
      > support of McLaw's Division near the Dunker Church. Here the troops of the
      > Union Second Army Corps had been beaten off, and Armistead's men were needed
      > to shore up the Confederate defenses in the area. Uncomfortable at being
      > held in reserve, Armistead stood in front of the brigade anxiously awaiting
      > the call for battle. Incredibly, a stray cannon ball rolled over the hill
      > and struck him on the foot, thereby putting him out of action. Although not
      > seriously injured he was compelled to relinquish his command to Colonel
      > James G. Hodges and leave the field."...."During the Maryland campaign
      > Armistead's five regiments reported only thirty-five casualties."
      >
      > Regards,
      > Teej
      >
      >
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