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Re: Armistead was] Re: West Point @ Antietam

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  • Teej Smith
    ... Brian, In his monograph titled Trust in God and Fear Nothing : Gen. Lewis A. Armistead, CSA, Wayne Motts wrote, Emboldened by his success at Second
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 20, 2005
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      Brian Downey wrote:


      > Hi Richard,
      >
      > Great story on Armistead, if true. Do you have good sources for
      > Armistead's wounding or Hancock's asking?
      >
      > I believe Armistead was Provost Marshal, ANV, at the time, and
      > remember reading that he was as far away as Winchester or maybe
      > Leesburg gathering stragglers and objectors on the 17th (I've gotta
      > dig into that). He could have been wounded under those circumstances,
      > but it seems unlikely.

      Brian,

      In his monograph titled "Trust in God and Fear Nothing" : Gen. Lewis A.
      Armistead, CSA, Wayne Motts wrote, "Emboldened by his success at Second
      Manassas, Lee launched an offensive into Maryland that culminated in the
      Battle of Sharpsburg (Antietam to northerners), but here again, Armistead
      saw limited action. In early September, while serving in the Confederate
      division commanded by Major General Richard H. Anderson, Armistead was
      appointed Provost Marshal of the Army of Northern Virginia. He served on
      this assignment until September 26, 1862., and from all accounts, his
      brigade remained with him as his guard for the task. Brought in at
      Sharpsburg, his brigade arrived on the field on the morning of September 17,
      but instead of joining their division near the sunken road were held back in
      support of McLaw's Division near the Dunker Church. Here the troops of the
      Union Second Army Corps had been beaten off, and Armistead's men were needed
      to shore up the Confederate defenses in the area. Uncomfortable at being
      held in reserve, Armistead stood in front of the brigade anxiously awaiting
      the call for battle. Incredibly, a stray cannon ball rolled over the hill
      and struck him on the foot, thereby putting him out of action. Although not
      seriously injured he was compelled to relinquish his command to Colonel
      James G. Hodges and leave the field."...."During the Maryland campaign
      Armistead's five regiments reported only thirty-five casualties."

      Regards,
      Teej
    • G E Mayers
      Dear Teej, Thank you! My memory was indeed correct. Very respectfully, G E Gerry Mayers Confederate Signal Corps, Longstreet s Corps ... From: Teej Smith
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 20, 2005
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        Dear Teej,

        Thank you! My memory was indeed correct.

        Very respectfully,
        G E "Gerry" Mayers
        Confederate Signal Corps,
        Longstreet's Corps



        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Teej Smith" <teej@...>
        To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Monday, June 20, 2005 6:09 PM
        Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Armistead was] Re: West Point @ Antietam


        >
        > Brian Downey wrote:
        >
        >
        >> Hi Richard,
        >>
        >> Great story on Armistead, if true. Do you have good sources for
        >> Armistead's wounding or Hancock's asking?
        >>
        >> I believe Armistead was Provost Marshal, ANV, at the time, and
        >> remember reading that he was as far away as Winchester or maybe
        >> Leesburg gathering stragglers and objectors on the 17th (I've gotta
        >> dig into that). He could have been wounded under those circumstances,
        >> but it seems unlikely.
        >
        > Brian,
        >
        > In his monograph titled "Trust in God and Fear Nothing" : Gen. Lewis A.
        > Armistead, CSA, Wayne Motts wrote, "Emboldened by his success at Second
        > Manassas, Lee launched an offensive into Maryland that culminated in the
        > Battle of Sharpsburg (Antietam to northerners), but here again, Armistead
        > saw limited action. In early September, while serving in the Confederate
        > division commanded by Major General Richard H. Anderson, Armistead was
        > appointed Provost Marshal of the Army of Northern Virginia. He served on
        > this assignment until September 26, 1862., and from all accounts, his
        > brigade remained with him as his guard for the task. Brought in at
        > Sharpsburg, his brigade arrived on the field on the morning of September
        > 17,
        > but instead of joining their division near the sunken road were held back
        > in
        > support of McLaw's Division near the Dunker Church. Here the troops of the
        > Union Second Army Corps had been beaten off, and Armistead's men were
        > needed
        > to shore up the Confederate defenses in the area. Uncomfortable at being
        > held in reserve, Armistead stood in front of the brigade anxiously
        > awaiting
        > the call for battle. Incredibly, a stray cannon ball rolled over the hill
        > and struck him on the foot, thereby putting him out of action. Although
        > not
        > seriously injured he was compelled to relinquish his command to Colonel
        > James G. Hodges and leave the field."...."During the Maryland campaign
        > Armistead's five regiments reported only thirty-five casualties."
        >
        > Regards,
        > Teej
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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      • bdowney@aotw.org
        Thanks Teej, This is just the kind of thing I needed. It clears up the apparent conflict nicely. Thanks also for popping this one to the surface Mr Croker.
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 20, 2005
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          Thanks Teej,

          This is just the kind of thing I needed. It clears up the apparent conflict nicely. Thanks
          also for popping this one to the surface Mr Croker.

          Brian

          To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
          From: "Teej Smith" <teej@...>
          Date sent: Mon, 20 Jun 2005 18:09:29 -0400
          Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Armistead was] Re: West Point @ Antietam
          Send reply to: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com

          > Brian,
          >
          > In his monograph titled "Trust in God and Fear Nothing" : Gen. Lewis A.
          > Armistead, CSA, Wayne Motts wrote, "Emboldened by his success at Second
          > Manassas, Lee launched an offensive into Maryland that culminated in the
          > Battle of Sharpsburg (Antietam to northerners), but here again, Armistead
          > saw limited action. In early September, while serving in the Confederate
          > division commanded by Major General Richard H. Anderson, Armistead was
          > appointed Provost Marshal of the Army of Northern Virginia. He served on
          > this assignment until September 26, 1862., and from all accounts, his
          > brigade remained with him as his guard for the task. Brought in at
          > Sharpsburg, his brigade arrived on the field on the morning of September 17,
          > but instead of joining their division near the sunken road were held back in
          > support of McLaw's Division near the Dunker Church. Here the troops of the
          > Union Second Army Corps had been beaten off, and Armistead's men were needed
          > to shore up the Confederate defenses in the area. Uncomfortable at being
          > held in reserve, Armistead stood in front of the brigade anxiously awaiting
          > the call for battle. Incredibly, a stray cannon ball rolled over the hill
          > and struck him on the foot, thereby putting him out of action. Although not
          > seriously injured he was compelled to relinquish his command to Colonel
          > James G. Hodges and leave the field."...."During the Maryland campaign
          > Armistead's five regiments reported only thirty-five casualties."
          >
          > Regards,
          > Teej
          >
          >
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