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Re: "At ease"

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  • Bill and Glenna Jo Christen
    ... Richard, I do not believe it was a textbook command. I have not come across it in any drill manuals that I have studied. I believe that the command Rest
    Message 1 of 12 , Aug 3, 2004
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      > From: <richard@...>

      > Was "at ease" a command in 1862? If not -- what would have been it's
      > equivalent?

      Richard,

      I do not believe it was a textbook "command. I have not come across it in any
      drill manuals that I have studied.

      I believe that the command "Rest" would have been used in a military formation.

      Was it used in a conversational situation, such as an soldier appearing before
      a superior officer in an office setting? That, I am not sure because we do not
      have much in the way of primary source documentation on normal dialogue except
      theatrical military "personations."

      I did not find any "at ease" expression in my slang dictionaries, and the word
      "ease" in the eighteenth and nineteenth century had more worldly nuances.

      Bill Christen
      --
      gwjchris@...
    • richard@rcroker.com
      Thank you Bill. Here s the situation. It s a council of war. A room full of generals (division and corps commanders) are sitting around awaiting the arrival
      Message 2 of 12 , Aug 3, 2004
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        Thank you Bill.

        Here's the situation.

        It's a council of war. A room full of generals (division and corps
        commanders) are sitting around awaiting the arrival of the Commanding
        General of the Army of the Potomac (in this case, Ambrose Burnside).
        Burnside enters the room and they all come to attention. What would
        Burnside say? In modern terms it would be "as you were."

        Sidebar -- he doesn't say it becaused he is REALLY POd, and he keeps them
        standing -- but I need to know what he "should have said" anyway.


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Bill and Glenna Jo Christen" <gwjchris@...>
        To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, August 03, 2004 1:19 PM
        Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: "At ease"


        >
        >
        >
        > > From: <richard@...>
        >
        > > Was "at ease" a command in 1862? If not -- what would have been it's
        > > equivalent?
        >
        > Richard,
        >
        > I do not believe it was a textbook "command. I have not come across it in
        any
        > drill manuals that I have studied.
        >
        > I believe that the command "Rest" would have been used in a military
        formation.
        >
        > Was it used in a conversational situation, such as an soldier appearing
        before
        > a superior officer in an office setting? That, I am not sure because we do
        not
        > have much in the way of primary source documentation on normal dialogue
        except
        > theatrical military "personations."
        >
        > I did not find any "at ease" expression in my slang dictionaries, and the
        word
        > "ease" in the eighteenth and nineteenth century had more worldly nuances.
        >
        > Bill Christen
        > --
        > gwjchris@...
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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