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RE: [TalkAntietam] Re: Interrogating a witness tree

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  • Rawlings, Kevin
    Tim and Brian, It is a witness tree as it has been in (a tree witness protection program, haha, could not resist)a historic tree program (I can t recall the
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 30, 2004
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      Tim and Brian,

      It is a witness tree as it has been in (a tree witness protection program,
      haha, could not resist)a historic tree program (I can't recall the proper
      name right off the bat, but I was working for the Civil War Trust at the
      time.)that they have made seedlings from. Some years back I was involved in
      a promotional picture with Tom Clemens and Tom Lively as Union and
      Confederate soldiers planting a new "cloned" tree for this historical tree
      prgram that also featured treelings from other historic sites, civil war and
      earlier eras. I have a flier from that program buried in my files somewhere.

      Kevin Rawlings

      -----Original Message-----
      From: tjrhys62 [mailto:tjreesecg@...]
      Sent: Wednesday, June 30, 2004 3:25 PM
      To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Interrogating a witness tree


      I think you have a winner. Next time I'm over there (15 minutes
      away) I'll take a closer look.

      Tim

      --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "Brian Morris"
      <ironbrigade@k...> wrote:
      > Here's a better and closer picture of the tree. This is a section
      cut out of
      > one of the pictures I took of the bridge (I take high resolution
      pictures
      > and then resize them down later) in April.
      > http://www.kswader.com/judi/civilwar/witnesstree.jpg
      >
      > As you can see, the tree looks much older than it does in any of
      the other
      > pictures. I'm tending to think this one could very well be a
      witness tree
      > now that I'm looking at these pictures I took with the tree in
      them.
      >
      > Brian
      >
      >
      >
      > > Hi Brian,
      > >
      > > Looks like the Burnside's Bridge sycamore may very well be a
      witness
      > > tree, judging by specs found at
      > > http://www.2020site.org/trees/sycamore.html Have a look.
      > >
      > > However, documenting such things seems impossible aside from
      locale.
      > > The tree depicted in the postwar (Forbes?) engraving, compared to
      > > current size and breadth, strongly suggests a logical growth
      > > progession.
      > >
      > > Suffice it to say that odds are more in favor of it being the
      real
      > > thing. If it could only talk... despite recent injury.
      > >
      > > Tim
      > >
      > > --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "Brian Morris"
      > > <ironbrigade@k...> wrote:
      > > > Found this website recently that purports to show witness
      trees to
      > > certain
      > > > Civil War battles. Some I know are correct such as the
      Baltimore
      > > St.
      > > > Sycamores and Locust tree in the Cemetery in Gettysburg but the
      > > website also
      > > > makes claims about the White Oaks at the Copse of Trees which I
      > > know are not
      > > > old enough to be witness trees.
      > > > http://www.bivouacbooks.com/bbv2i1s4.htm
      > > >
      > > > For the Antietam Battlefirld they show a picture of the
      Sycamore
      > > that sits
      > > > alongside the Burnside Bridge and then show a picture taken
      > > shortly after
      > > > the battle that shows a tree in that same area. OK, I'm not a
      big
      > > tree
      > > > expert here but I've stood next to that tree by the Burnside
      > > Bridge and it
      > > > does not strike me as a 140+ year old tree. Just because there
      was
      > > a tree in
      > > > that general location in 1862 doesn't make the one there in
      2004
      > > the very
      > > > same tree.
      > > >
      > > > Is that tree next to the bridge a witness tree or do we have
      > > someone jumping
      > > > to conclusions here based off of two trees being in a similar
      area
      > > 140 years
      > > > apart?
      > > >
      > > > Brian
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >






      Yahoo! Groups Links
    • James Madison
      Thanks for the information guys. I ll be there next week somtime and be sure to give that tree a little more attention. Outside of the general topography of
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 30, 2004
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        Thanks for the information guys. I'll be there next week somtime and
        be sure to give that tree a little more attention. Outside of the
        general topography of the of the battle grounds are their any other
        significent natural features that remain?
      • robert blama
        That is the same tree A tree 140 yrs old does not have to be that big ... From: Brian Morris To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wednesday, June 30, 2004
        Message 3 of 9 , Jun 30, 2004
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          That is the same tree A tree 140 yrs old does not have to be that big
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Brian Morris
          To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Wednesday, June 30, 2004 2:33 PM
          Subject: [TalkAntietam] Interrogating a witness tree


          Found this website recently that purports to show witness trees to certain
          Civil War battles. Some I know are correct such as the Baltimore St.
          Sycamores and Locust tree in the Cemetery in Gettysburg but the website also
          makes claims about the White Oaks at the Copse of Trees which I know are not
          old enough to be witness trees.
          http://www.bivouacbooks.com/bbv2i1s4.htm

          For the Antietam Battlefirld they show a picture of the Sycamore that sits
          alongside the Burnside Bridge and then show a picture taken shortly after
          the battle that shows a tree in that same area. OK, I'm not a big tree
          expert here but I've stood next to that tree by the Burnside Bridge and it
          does not strike me as a 140+ year old tree. Just because there was a tree in
          that general location in 1862 doesn't make the one there in 2004 the very
          same tree.

          Is that tree next to the bridge a witness tree or do we have someone jumping
          to conclusions here based off of two trees being in a similar area 140 years
          apart?

          Brian







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        • richard@rcroker.com
          Speaking of witness trees -- I live close the the Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park where they tell you to look high in the trees and you can see odd
          Message 4 of 9 , Jun 30, 2004
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            Speaking of witness trees -- I live close the the Kennesaw Mountain National
            Battlefield Park where they tell you to look high in the trees and you can
            see odd branching -- where it has split into four or five limbs where you
            might only expect to see two. They say that the deformity is a result of
            being struck by cannon fire at a very young age.

            Richard Croker
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "James Madison" <jamesmadison_1999@...>
            To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Wednesday, June 30, 2004 4:05 PM
            Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Interrogating a witness tree


            > Thanks for the information guys. I'll be there next week somtime and
            > be sure to give that tree a little more attention. Outside of the
            > general topography of the of the battle grounds are their any other
            > significent natural features that remain?
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
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