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6953RE: [TalkAntietam] Re: Was Roulette's family at the farm during battle?

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  • G E Mayers
    Nov 2, 2012
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      Harry and Steve,

      Great posts guys!

      Gerry

      -----Original Message-----
      From: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Harry
      Sent: Friday, November 02, 2012 5:15 PM
      To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [TalkAntietam] Re: Was Roulette's family at the farm during battle?



      I too may have mis-counted the Roulette children – can’t recall whether or not I factored in Carrie May’s later birthdate.

      FWIW, here’s the text of the story as I submitted it – there were slight edits made for the published version, but nothing major, IIRC.


      When he realized that the men streaming past his home were Union soldiers and not the Confederates who had been in the fields the past two days, William Roulette burst out of his cellar door: “Give it to ‘em,” he shouted to troops of the 14th Connecticut, “Drive ‘em! Take anything on my place, only drive ‘em!” While the Second Corps of the Army of the Potomac would eventually drive the Confederates from their line in the sunken Hog Trough Road that separated his farm from that of his uncle Henry Piper to the south, they would do so while very nearly taking Mr. Roulette up on his offer fully.

      When the armies of Robert E. Lee and George McClellan met just north of Sharpsburg in Maryland’s Washington County on September 17th, 1862, on what would become known as the bloodiest day in U. S. history, they did so on farmsteads that were predominantly well established and prosperous. Much of the area was settled in the first half of the 18th century by families who relocated from Pennsylvania’s Lancaster County. One of those families was that of John Reynolds, who in 1761 purchased a part of “Anderson’s Delight”, including a house that was constructed as early as 1748. By 1800, two additions were complete resulting in a frame, stone, and log dwelling of more than 2,000 square feet, not insubstantial even by today’s standards. In 1804, the farm was purchased by John Miller, Jr. of a prominent area family. In 1851 and after John’s death, his heirs sold the farm and widow’s dower for $10,610 to son-in-law William Roulette (sometimes spelled Rulett), who had married John’s 17-year-old daughter Margaret in 1847. William was the grandson of French immigrants to Washington County, and a son of the sister of neighbor Henry Piper. In 1862 he and Margaret were raising corn on his 180 acre farm, along with five children ranging from under two to thirteen years of age. Living with the Roulettes was Nancy Campbell, a former slave of Margaret’s uncle Peter Miller. At 37 William, a successful farmer with a paid servant, was also serving as a unionist Washington County commissioner.

      The Army of Northern Virginia concentrated in the fields north of the village of Sharpsburg and on September 15th. Despite obvious signs of impending danger, William determined to ride out the storm with his family in his home. But as it became more obvious that his farm was likely to be in the thick of things, he removed his family some six miles to Manor Dunker Church where they were taken in by a minister. At some point on the 17th, he returned to the farm to look after his stock and became trapped between the defensive line established by Confederate General D. H. Hill’s division and the rapidly approaching division of Union General William French. First Mr. Roulette took refuge in his basement and then, after emerging to shout his encouragement and offer up his worldly possessions to the boys in blue, headed north to the rear.

      The fighting in this sector of the battlefield of Antietam, during what is referred to as the middle phase of the battle, was some of the most severe of the war. Two Federal divisions advanced over the Roulette farm fields and hurled themselves against the stoutly fortified but outnumbered Confederates in the sunken farm lane. The Confederates were finally driven south across the Piper farm, but damage to the Roulette place was extensive. An artillery shell ripped through the west side of the house, travelling upward through the first floor ceiling. At least one bullet fired from the vicinity of the sunken road entered though a second story bedroom window and passed through two walls and a closet in a middle bedroom (this damage can be seen today). Another shell upset beehives in the yard to the rear of the dwelling, causing confusion among the green troops of the 130th PA. Chaplain H. S. Stevens of the 14th CT recalled: “During the battle the rooms were stripped of their furnishings and the floors were covered with the blood and dirt and litter of a field hospital.” Dead and dying men lay scattered across the farm, filling the outbuildings. When the Roulettes returned after the battle, they found crops trampled, fences down, and personal property, including food, carried off. Soldier’s graves dotted the landscape.

      On October 3, 1862, Mr. Roulette filed his first claim against the United States for damages to his property. Over the years his claims would include items large a small; fences and crops, featherbeds and carpets, structural damage, one beehive (and bees), chickens, blackberry wine. Claims were also made for nine acres of farmland ruined by the passage of men and equipment, and additional “buriel [sic] ground for 700 soldiers”. The grand total for his final claims filed in February 1864 was $3,500. In the 1880’s he received $371 for a hospital claim, but only minimal other payments. He was paid nothing for damages to his home and outbuildings.

      William Roulette was well off before his farm became the center of a storm of men, horses, and lead on September 17, 1862. Despite his failure to collect significant reimbursement from the Federal Government for the taking of “anything on my place”, he and his family would recover – for the most part. About a month after the battle, the youngest Roulette child, Carrie May, described by William as “a charming little girl twenty months old…just beginning to talk”, died of typhoid fever. The sting of this loss was softened a bit 24 months later, when Margaret gave birth to the couple’s last child, Ulysses Sheridan Roulette. Despite the damages, William’s heart was still with the Union.

      The farm remained in the possession of the Roulette family until 1956, and in 1998 the National Park Service acquired the property via The Conservation Fund. Restoration of the exterior of the house and the first floor interior to their 1862 appearance is planned pending funding.”

      From: cowie_steve
      Sent: Friday, November 02, 2012 4:44 PM
      To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Was Roulette's family at the farm during battle?

      Gerry,

      Regarding the discrepancy in the total number of Roulette children, Ernst correctly concluded that some sources likely pulled directly from the 1860 census and therefore failed to include the youngest Roulette daughter, who was born after the census was taken.

      The 1860 census lists five Roulette children: Ann, John, Joseph, Susan and Benjamin.

      However, a sixth child, Carrie May Roulette, was born on Feb. 23, 1860. She died shortly after the battle, in October 1862. Factoring in Carrie May, the Roulettes had six children living with them in September 1862.

      William Roulette himself confirmed this figure. Here's an excerpt from a 12/31/1862 letter that he wrote to the family of Private Robert Hubbard:

      "Allow me to introduce to you my family, wife and 5 children, 2 girls and 3 boys of which the oldest Ann Elizabeth 13-years-old. Our youngest died since the battle - a charming little girl 20-months-old Carrie May just beginning to talk. The battle caused considerable destruction of property here. My nearest neighbor [Samuel Mumma] lost his house and barn to fire. I lost valuable horses, some sheep and hogs. Please write as soon as you receive this and inform me whether all is right."

      Steve

      --- In mailto:TalkAntietam%40yahoogroups.com, "G E Mayers" <gerry1952@...> wrote:
      >
      > Guys;
      >
      > Good discussion points! I also have GOB and here is the source information:
      >
      > Footnote 29, in my softbound copy, is on page 257:
      >
      > 29. Souvenir of Excursion to Battlefield by the Society of the Fourteenth Connecticut Regiment (Washington, 1893), pp. 51, 56, 57.
      >
      > Not sure if this helps? Also, since I have Kathleen Ernst's book "Too Scared to Cry," I looked up her mention of the Roulette incident and found some interesting information:
      >
      > 1. The full mention of her comment re the Roulette family that she made in her talk during the 150th anniversary weekend is on page 121 of her book and says, "Confederates advised William and Margaret Roulette to leave, as well. [This was September 15, two days before the battle.--My note as per information from pg. 119 of her book.]The couple had five children, ranging in age from two to thirteen, but they decided to risk the battle and stay rather than abandon their home to the foraging Confederates." Taken in this light, it sounds entirely different does it not?
      >
      > 2. On pg. 143 of her book, Ernst says: "The Roulette family--William, Margaret, and their six children ranging from twenty months to thirteen years--had found dubious shelter among pickle barrels and potato bins in the cellar, already enduring several hours of ferocious battle. Suddenly the cellar door banged opened and a group of Confederate skirmishers plunged inside, chased by men of the 14th Connecticut, who gleefully barricaded the door behind them."
      >
      > Two things jump out to me here:
      >
      > a. There appears to be an error in the number of children the Roulettes had on September 15-17, 1862. Was it five or was it six?
      > b. Ernst is seemingly confirming the quote in GOB by Murfin from the 14th CT.
      >
      > The footnote for the above quote in Ernst says, "Some records indicate that the Roulettes had five children at the time of the battle, but their youngest child was probably born after the 1860 census was taken; she died in October 1862 and therefore does not appear on late records."
      >
      > All that does is confirm the discrepancy in the number of children, nothing more.
      >
      > However, O T Reilly, in Battlefield of Antietam, has a mention of the Roulette incident. Does anyone have that?
      >
      > Yr. Obt. Svt.
      > G E "Gerry" Mayers
      >
      > "True patriotism sometimes requires of men to act exactly contrary, at one period, to that which it does at another, and the motive which impels them--the desire to do right--is precisely the same. The circumstances which govern their actions change; and their conduct must conform to the new order of things." -- Robert E. Lee
      >
      >
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: mailto:TalkAntietam%40yahoogroups.com [mailto:mailto:TalkAntietam%40yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of cowie_steve
      > Sent: Thursday, November 01, 2012 2:57 PM
      > To: mailto:TalkAntietam%40yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Was Roulette's family at the farm during battle?
      >
      >
      >
      > Hi, Tom.
      >
      > Murfin in GOB, p. 256, wrote that "William Roulette himself was keeping an eye on developments for his family had been prisoners in their own home since early morning, unable to leave for the firing." I'm unable to look up Murfin's source at the moment but I wanted to pass this info along. Also, I'm curious to know if this topic is mentioned the Antietam Farmsteads book. I've yet to purchase a copy, but hear that it's excellent.
      >
      > Steve
      >
      > --- In mailto:TalkAntietam%40yahoogroups.com, RoteBaron@ wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > I recently finished an exhausting series of trips to Antietam, with most recent being full day guiding a bus of 58 people around the battlefield. Great fun! Now I've got some questions to pose.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > I know Wiliam Roulette stayed at his farm during the battle. It was my understanding that hi s wife Margaret  and their children headed north and were not present on Sept 17.  Yet, during her talk at Antietam on anniversary weekend, K athleen Ernst mentioned that the family was there.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Anyone have the definitive answer?
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Tom Shay
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
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      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >

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