Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

6686Re: [TalkAntietam] Re: Burial duty at Antietam: burning of bodies?

Expand Messages
  • Jim Rosebrock
    Nov 11, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Thanks Steve,
      Was wondering if it was in a collection of some kind.  I have never heard of them burning human bodies.  Horses and livestock are another matter.
      Jim



      ________________________________
      From: cowie_steve <cowie_steve@...>
      To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, November 11, 2011 10:26 AM
      Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Burial duty at Antietam: burning of bodies?


       
      Hi, Jim.

      I stumbled upon this quote online while perusing a past auction at Raynors'. The sale item was described as a "War-date Autograph Letter Signed by John C. Sunderlin, 5th Vermont Infantry, WIA at Fredericksburg 12/13/1862, 3p. octavo, Williamsport, September 21, 1862."

      Steve

      --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, Jim Rosebrock <pointsalines@...> wrote:
      >
      > Steve,
      > Is that quote in a diary, or collection of letters?
      > Jim Rosebrock
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: cowie_steve <cowie_steve@...>
      > To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Friday, November 11, 2011 8:20 AM
      > Subject: [TalkAntietam] Burial duty at Antietam: burning of bodies?
      >
      >
      >  
      > To the forum:
      >
      > John C. Sunderlin, 5th Vermont Infantry, wrote from Williamsport on September 21, 1862 (in part):
      >
      > "...we were again engaged I suppose in one of the most terrible battles ever fought on this Continent. Our regiment suffered little though exposed to steady danger for most two days. O the heaps and heaps of dead and dying the day after the battle, a pleasant one too, the air stank for five miles around caused by the dead bodies though lots of men were engaged burying them and had been busy day and night. Last night [Sept. 20] as we passed the different fields, for the battle extended five or six miles, they were burning the bodies of men and horses that could not be moved, and the air stank so in some places that one could hardly breathe..."
      >
      > While we've all read accounts of horse carcasses being burned after the battle, has anyone come across any sources describing the intentional burning of human remains?
      >
      > Steve
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Show all 7 messages in this topic