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5578Re: [TalkAntietam] Re: While we're talking about gaps and roads...

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  • Thomas Clemens
    Mar 5 7:11 PM
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      Yes, technically the National Road went from Cumberland westweard as the east portion already existed. Locally the road from Hagerstown to Frederick was called the Bank Road since a consortium of banks financed its construction and owned it.

      Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
      Professor of History
      Hagerstown Community College


      >>> "eighth_conn_inf" <eighth_conn_inf@...> 03/05/09 6:48 PM >>>
      Tom,

      I'm hoping the book I have coming, "The Braddock expedition and Fox's Gap in Maryland" sheds some light on the area.

      I just looked at the 24 page introduction to Hamill Kenney's book "The Place Names of Maryland: Their Origin and Meaning," which is really interesting. And after looking at dozens of maps mainly from the LOC and also the CD I have, spelling of names as well as the names themselves in the 1700 and 1800's sometimes defy reason.

      I see in a book by Karl Raitz, "A Guide to the National Road," that the reason the National Road in that area is often named the National Pike is that the Naional Road between Baltimore and Cumberland was composed of 4 private turnpikes: Baltimore and Frederick Turnpike, Hagerstown and Boonsboro Turnpike, Hagerstown and Conococheague Turnpike, and Cumberland Turnpike. These existed before the National Road was started. The Baltimore-Frederick Tpke organized in 1805 ran from Baltimore to Boonsboro. The Hagerstown and Boonsboro Tpke was the first macadam road in the US built in 1822-23. Lt. JKF Mansfield in 1823 was the first military superintendant of the N Road east from Ohio.

      Unfortunately not much help on the issues we have been looking at.

      Larry



      --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas Clemens" <clemenst@...> wrote:
      >
      > Larry,
      > Thank you for your work on this and your careful scrutiny of the maps. If, and it is an if, we assume that the OHR goes nowhere near Turner's Gap or Frosttown Gap, what do we do with Carman's statment. John Frye thinks what is Dahlgren Road now was the earliest crossing of the gap, and thus by default classifies as an OHR. But how did Carman know that, and ignore the other? WHere did the idea of this being OHR originate? Are we looking at another "Ripley and Hamburg Pass" situation?
      >
      >
      > Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
      > Professor of History
      > Hagerstown Community
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