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4013Re: [TalkAntietam] Macadamized turnpikes, RR's, etc.

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  • G E Mayers
    Jan 16, 2008
      Dear Larry;

      To the best of my knowledge the National Road was definitely
      macadamized; the Boonsborough Pike may have been but, since it
      led right into Sharpsburg, I would doubt it.

      The Hagerstown Turnpike also might have been macadamized but
      again might not.

      At that point in the war, Southern footsoles were not as tough as
      they would be about a year later. Straggling due to the road
      surfaces was a major problem during the campaign.

      Gary Gallaher's editing of the volume titled "The Antietam
      Campaign" has several good essays in it that might be helpful.

      Yr. Obt. Svt.
      G E "Gerry" Mayers

      To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even
      on one's mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the
      Union, a passport to any foreign country, and a benediction from
      the Almighty God. --Anonymous
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "eighth_conn_inf" <eighth_conn_inf@...>
      To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, January 16, 2008 4:46 PM
      Subject: [TalkAntietam] Macadamized turnpikes, RR's, etc.


      If folks have some answers/opinions re the below I'd like to hear
      them
      but pls don't spend time researching: if you have good specific
      references pls let me know.

      Macadamized (crushed rock) roads according to Carman were
      everywhere
      but he does not say which roads were and to what length or
      discuss the
      quality of the use of crushed rock. My guess is that the National
      Road
      was fully macadamized as were many of the main roads leading out
      of
      D.C. How about the roads/pikes around Sharpsburg? My question has
      to do
      with the many barefoot Confederates coming out of Virginia and
      marching
      around during the Maryland Campaign. Straggling was heavy on both
      sides
      but wasn't the factor of shod v. unshod feet more of a factor for
      the
      Confederates? Or are road surfaces during the campaign of very
      minor
      concern? I wondered about Jackson's slow marches to Martinsburg
      from
      Frederick and then to HF--barefooted, slow soldiers?

      <snip>
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