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295Re: [TalkAntietam] Re: Article about Hoods Texans

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  • NJ Rebel
    Aug 27, 2001
      Todd;

      If you ask Tom Shay about the videos from one of the Antietam
      anniversary ranger tours, there is a tape he has in which Keith
      Snyder talks about how cornfields were planted in the mid-19th
      Century.

      Hope this helps.

      Your humble servant,
      Gerry Mayers
      Co. B, "Tom Green Rifles",
      Fourth Regiment, Texas Volunteer Infantry

      "I know of no fitter resting-place for a soldier than the field
      on which he has nobly laid down his life." --General Robert
      Edward Lee


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "TR Livesey" <westwood@...>
      To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Monday, August 27, 2001 8:49 PM
      Subject: Re: [TalkAntietam] Re: Article about Hoods Texans


      > O.G.,
      >
      > I am going to immediately admit that I am not an expert
      > in this field (heh-heh). My statements were based
      > on questions I have put to general historians, none of
      > whom claimed to be agricultural experts.
      >
      > I would not, however, base any conclusions on practices
      > of modern, albeit primitive, farmers. Just because they
      > don't use tractors does not mean that they do it the
      > same way as was done 100 years ago.
      >
      > When you look at a modern cornfield, it is so dense
      > that it provides excellent concealment.
      >
      > Although I'm not certain how a 19th century cornfield
      > would look, but, as I stated, I assume that it also
      > provides a certain degree of concealment as well.
      >
      > Do you have any source particular to 19th century
      > corn farming? I would very much like to hear an
      > authoritative source on the subject.
      >
      > Thanks for your comment -
      >
      > TRL
      > oliverg25@... wrote:
      > >
      > > --- In TalkAntietam@y..., TR Livesey <westwood@e...> wrote:
      > > > David,
      > > >
      > > > > Corn planting patterns were different in 1862, not nearly
      as
      > > > dense, with rows being wide enough for a horse to move
      between.
      > > > This would imply that the corn will have different degrees
      of
      > > > concealment,
      > >
      > > Not So!
      > > Once the corn is planted a horse never goes into the field.
      Plowing
      > > and planting is usually done with a team of horses, not one.
      after
      > > planting there is no need for a horse to go back into the
      field. Also
      > > a horse does not damage the top soil as much as a tractor
      wheel
      > >
      > > Amish farmers in PA still use horses and mules and their rows
      are
      > > tighter than those of farmers using tractors. Their fields
      are so
      > > tight you can not look down a row.
      > >
      > > This might come through twice when Hotmail gets its act
      together.
      > >
      > > O.G.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
      http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
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