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2285RE: [TalkAntietam] Final Attack Trail officially opens in Sept

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  • Jeff Beckner (PWC Magazine)
    Aug 30, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Thanks. No substitute for walking the actual ground; as much of it as
      possible.

      -----Original Message-----
      From: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com]
      On Behalf Of G E Mayers
      Sent: Tuesday, August 30, 2005 9:41 AM
      To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [TalkAntietam] Final Attack Trail officially opens in Sept

      Jeff,

      IIRC, it starts at the Otto Farm just up from the Burnside Bridge
      overlook...........

      Very respectfully,
      G E "Gerry" Mayers

      "As an American citizen I prize the Union very highly
      and know of no personal sacrifice that I would not make
      to preserve it, save that of honour."
      --Robt. E. Lee, Letter to Rooney Lee, 3 December 1860

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Jeff Beckner (PWC Magazine)" <jbeckner@...>
      To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, August 30, 2005 10:37 AM
      Subject: RE: [TalkAntietam] Final Attack Trail officially opens in Sept


      > Excellent. If it's 1.7 miles, does it start at the river?
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
      [mailto:TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com]
      > On Behalf Of rotbaron@...
      > Sent: Tuesday, August 30, 2005 6:47 AM
      > To: talkantietam@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [TalkAntietam] Final Attack Trail officially opens in Sept
      >
      >>From HAGERSTOWN HERALD-MAIL:
      >
      > "Hiking through history uphill: Trail at Antietam to provide real-life
      > experience"
      > by The Associated Press
      >
      > The final attack on the bloodiest day of the Civil War was literally
      an
      > uphill battle. Now a trail at Antietam National Battlefield lets
      hikers
      > feel the strain that soldiers from both sides experienced marching
      over
      > hilly farm fields toward a meeting that ended with the Union failing
      to
      > corner Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. "When you have an opportunity
      to
      > see the 200-foot change in elevation, when people come out here and
      > walk, they can see the terrain stopped the Union advance as much as
      the
      > Confederate soldiers did," said Brian Baracz, a park ranger and
      > historian. "You don't get much of an idea from your car."
      >
      > The Final Attack Trail officially opens next month during a weekend of
      > activities marking the 133rd anniversary of the Battle of Antietam,
      also
      > known as the Battle of Sharpsburg. More than 23,000 men were killed,
      > wounded or reported missing at the Western Maryland site on Sept. 17,
      > 1862, in the bloodiest one-day clash of the War Between the States.
      The
      > 1.7-mile trail is the fourth at Antietam. A planned fifth trail will
      > create a network of footpaths across the 3,288-acre park.
      >
      > The Final Attack Trail winds through a cornfield where the day's last
      > engagement took place, starting at about 3:40 p.m. Lee's 2,800 troops
      > were retreating, aiming to cross the Potomac River to safety. Union
      Gen.
      > Ambrose Burnside's 8,000 soldiers were moving through the 40-acre
      > cornfield on a course that would cut off Lee's line of retreat. Then
      > Confederate Gen. A.P. Hill arrived from the south with 2,500 troops.
      > Burnside's troops were driven back in a nearly two-hour clash that
      > resulted in 3,470 casualties, according to the park's Web site. There
      > were twice as many Union casualties as Confederate.
      >
      > The next day, Federal and Confederate leaders struck an informal truce
      > so they could gather their wounded and dying. That evening, Lee began
      > withdrawing his army across the Potomac. The fighting took place on
      > land that remained in private hands until three years ago, when the
      > National Park Service acquired 136 acres of the Shade Farm. The field
      is
      > dotted with monuments erected by veterans organizations and states
      with
      > soldiers who fought there. "Most of the troops were from New York,
      > Connecticut, Rhode Island and Ohio, and we get a lot of letters from
      > folks in those areas wanting to see this. It's really important for
      them
      > to be able to walk in the footsteps of the soldiers," said
      > Superintendent John Howard.
      >
      > Tom Shay
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
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