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1624Re: [TalkAntietam] Questions about Antietam

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  • rotbaron@aol.com
    Sep 17, 2004
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      Gerry,

      My further comments to your responses are in caps below (except Carman in
      lower case):

      ==============================
      Q: Did AP Hll's men actually display the US Flag (Stars & Stripes)?
      Good question. But I think to do so would be to risk being fired upon by
      their own men as they came up......

      LT. COL.CURTIS OF 4TH RI DESCRIBES: "AS THE ENEMY SHOWED THE NATIONAL FLAG
      [STARS AND STRIPES]..." Source: Murfin's The Gleam of Bayonets Pg 284

      ==============================
      Q: Were a significant number of Rebs actually in The Cornfield as Hooker's
      dawn attack began?
      What is a significant number? From what I have read, it appears (IIR) that
      Lawton's men were the ones hidden in the corn as Hooker's lead brigades came up.

      LAWTON'S DIVISION FORMED ON JONES' EXTREME RIGHT WITH HIS OWN AND TRIMBLE'S
      BRIGADES TO THE EXTREME RIGHT ASTRIDE THE SMOKETOWN ROAD FACING A NORTHEASTERLY
      DIRECTION."

      CARMAN NOTES AS FOLLOWS:

      Lawton's Brigade, commanded by Colonel Marcellus Douglass, 13th Georgia, had
      six Georgia regiments--the 13th, 26th, 31st, 38th, 60th, and 61st--numbering
      1150 men. When first in position, and until the battle had fairly opened, the
      left of the brigade was about 120 yards east of the Hagerstown road, and the
      three left regiments--the 26th, 38th, and 61st, in order named from left to
      right-- from 225 to 230 yards south of the Miller cornfield and practically
      parallel to it; the right wing of the brigade was refused and faced northeast. The
      31st Georgia was thrown to the front and left of the right wing, and to within
      120 yards of the, its right about 100 yards from the East Woods fence. When
      taking position, during the night of the 16th, two companies of the 31st, under
      command of Lieutenant W.H. Harrison, were advanced as pickets 50 feet into the
      corn, their right at the edge of the East Woods, their left extending to the
      Hagerstown road. Before daybreak of the 17th Harrison inadvertently stumbled
      upon the Union picket line, a few shots were fired, Harrison was captured, and
      his pickets were withdrawn from the corn and formed along its south border.
      The ground held by the brigade was somewhat lower than the cornfield, and, in
      nearly its entire length, was covered by low stone ledges, and small
      protuberances, which afforded some protection and, in places, a rail fence was thrown
      down and piled as a breastwork. In other places there was no protection, either
      of rock-ledge, inequality of the ground, or fence rails, but as the action
      progressed and the line rapidly thinned, those exposed positions were abandoned
      for the sheltered ones.

      ==============================
      Q: Some books really emphasize a counterattack by Rodes that reached near the
      Roulette Farm. Just how serious was this attack?

      WHEN RODES' UNIDENTIFIED TROOPS (TWO BRIGADES) REACHED THE ROULETTE FARM...
      Source: Murfin's The Gleam of Bayonets Pg 256

      Tom Shay


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