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Re: [TahlequahCommunityGarden] Fw: Jan 29 Meeting Summary-Plans for 2011

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  • Denise LaGrand
    If there is any space available in the garden, I would like to join. 3 of us will be sharing the duties of any space you alot us. Thanks! Sent from my iPhone
    Message 1 of 16 , Feb 1 2:38 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      If there is any space available in the garden, I would like to join. 3 of us will be sharing the duties of any space you alot us. Thanks!

      Sent from my iPhone

      On Jan 30, 2011, at 7:39 PM, Julie Gahn <juliegahn@...> wrote:

       

      ****************************************************************
       
      Hello all,
       
      Four of us communicated about the operation of the Tahlequah Community Garden either by email or in person today.
       
      You will notice below that Sue Catron has agreed to take on much of the daily/weekly oversight of the garden.  Please help her out.  We are trying this so that I might have enough time to start additional community gardens.  (In other words, my goal is to have an on-site coordinator at each garden, and my work will move up a level and be focused on ensuring we have enough tools, fencing, compost, etc etc to get started at each garden.  Once a garden is started and has committed participants, each one should become fairly smooth-running.)  We're going to test the idea here in the first community garden this year.  If we're successful, I'll try to start another garden next year.
       
      I will be contacting everyone to find out how much space you want in next year's garden before I put a public notice in the paper to offer space to new gardeners.  Please let  me know as soon as possible how much space you want so that we can let new gardeners plant February crops if they so desire.
       
      In addition to our 2010 Tahlequah Community Garden Ground Rules Agreed Upon By Growers (copy can be found in binder in shed), we've developed the following plans for the 2011 garden:
       
      1) Sue Catron volunteered to be the on-site coordinator for the garden.  Thank you Sue!
      Her phone number is 207-6379. Her email is: sue.catron@...
       
      2) Sue will be the first point of contact for:
      A)  Questions about the irrigation system
      B)  Inform Sue of any reason that you will not be able to keep up with your plot for any length of time.  Sue will coordinate an effort to ensure no food goes to waste by ensuring someone does the harvest & donates the food to the CARE Food Pantry.
      C)  Coordinate effort to keep up with weeds in common areas (more on that below.)
       
      3)  Communication among members
      A)  Tahlequah Community Garden Yahoo Group for group email communications.  (The address is in the To: line of this message.)
      B)  Phone numbers are listed on the plot map inserted in the front cover of the binder kept in the tool shed.
       
      4)  Weed control in common areas:
      A)  We have decided to eliminate the group compost area & to let each grower create their own compost.
      B)  We will eliminate the walkways around the edge (fenceline) and extend the beds to the fenceline. (That way, there is no space for weeds to grow along the fenceline inside the garden.)
      We will have one wide pathway running East to West from the gate to the shed, and one North to South pathway running down the middle of the garden.
      C)  Use of the wet newspaper (black & white printed pages (color pics on those pages are ok) but NO GLOSSY pages, print-free cardboard, leaves and woodchips (but take take to avoid walnut) is encouraged as mulch to keep weeds down in pathways.
      D) We will put the manifold of the irrigation system inside the fence and we will curl the bottom edges of the fence under toward the inside of the garden so that it is safe to mow closely to the fence.
      E)  If there is still a need for weed-eating, Sue will coordinate that effort.  Everyone, please take a turn so that no one person gets overwhelmed.
       
      5) Prevention of waste
      A) If you are traveling, sick, busy at work, otherwise having a life event that prevents you from keeping up with your plot, you are responsible to call or email Sue Catron 207-6379  sue.catron@... and/or TahlequahCommunityGarden@yahoogroups.com so that Sue can coordinate your harvest while you are gone.
      B) If you fail to follow step 5A and food is ready for picking in your plot, Sue will try to contact you by email and phone (provided your number is on the plot map.)  If you fail to respond within 24 hrs, Sue will coordinate your harvest until you notify her that you can once again keep up with it.
       
      6) Community herb row:
      A)  We will shift the community herb row south to run adjacent to Sue's edging.  This will make the East-West path into the garden wider.
      (Sue has already started to move the herb row and has requested feedback--it's not too late to change our plan of one E-W and one N-S path.)
      B)  We will label the herbs and try to clearly denote the community herb row on the plot map.
       
      7)  Fundraiser:
      A) If we need to raise additional funds, all participants will do their best to help with a fundraiser.  Two ideas have thus far been proposed:
      i)  A harvest-festival type of local food celebration--fundraising by preparing & selling a local food dinner
      ii) Selling excess produce at the Tahlequah Farmer's Market (note that Julie is unable to commit to selling at the Tahlequah Farmer's Market this year, so other growers would have to do this.)
       
      8)  Judith Anderson, Friend of the Community Garden, has offered to transport our food to the CARE Food Pantry once again this year. 
      A) If you are unable to transport your donations to the CARE Food Pantry yourself, just leave it on Judith's porch at 411 West Keetoowah.
           Judith's phone number is:  458 1885
      B) Judith would like to take the produce by 10:00 am Mon, Wed, or Fri, so you can either leave it on her porch early those mornings or the prior evenings.
       
      If I receive no strong protest, theses items will be added to the 2010 Tahlequah Community Garden Ground Rules Agreed Upon By Growers and that document will be our 2011 Tahlequah Community Garden Ground Rules Agreed Upon By Growers.
      Please respond to this email if you think anything else needs to be documented in our groundrules.
       
      Wishing you a happy, bountiful 2011 growing season,
      Julie
      207-9107
       
       
      Julie Gahn
      Coordinator, Tahlequah Community Garden
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TahlequahCommunityGarden/
      Board Member, Sustainable Tahlequah
      http://www.sustainabletahlequah.org/


      Also see:
      Oklahoma Food Cooperative
      http://www.oklahomafood.coop/
      Sustainable Green Country
      http://www.sustainablegreencountry.org/main/
      Oklahoma Sustainability Network
      http://www.oksustainability.org/

    • Denise LaGrand
      I am hoping the garden members may have some ideas of good cover crops for this area. I will not be planting my home garden this year, and would like to plant
      Message 2 of 16 , Feb 1 2:44 PM
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        I am hoping the garden members may have some ideas of good cover crops for this area. I will not be planting my home garden this year, and would like to plant an early cover crop to be tilled back in, and others successively planted throughout the season and into the fall. My main goal is weed control while the plot is fallow, with secondary goals of improving the soil.  Any ideas appreciated

        Sent from my iPhone

        On Jan 30, 2011, at 7:39 PM, Julie Gahn <juliegahn@...> wrote:

        ****************************************************************
         
        Hello all,
         
        Four of us communicated about the operation of the Tahlequah Community Garden either by email or in person today.
         
        You will notice below that Sue Catron has agreed to take on much of the daily/weekly oversight of the garden.  Please help her out.  We are trying this so that I might have enough time to start additional community gardens.  (In other words, my goal is to have an on-site coordinator at each garden, and my work will move up a level and be focused on ensuring we have enough tools, fencing, compost, etc etc to get started at each garden.  Once a garden is started and has committed participants, each one should become fairly smooth-running.)  We're going to test the idea here in the first community garden this year.  If we're successful, I'll try to start another garden next year.
         
        I will be contacting everyone to find out how much space you want in next year's garden before I put a public notice in the paper to offer space to new gardeners.  Please let  me know as soon as possible how much space you want so that we can let new gardeners plant February crops if they so desire.
         
        In addition to our 2010 Tahlequah Community Garden Ground Rules Agreed Upon By Growers (copy can be found in binder in shed), we've developed the following plans for the 2011 garden:
         
        1) Sue Catron volunteered to be the on-site coordinator for the garden.  Thank you Sue!
        Her phone number is 207-6379. Her email is: sue.catron@...
         
        2) Sue will be the first point of contact for:
        A)  Questions about the irrigation system
        B)  Inform Sue of any reason that you will not be able to keep up with your plot for any length of time.  Sue will coordinate an effort to ensure no food goes to waste by ensuring someone does the harvest & donates the food to the CARE Food Pantry.
        C)  Coordinate effort to keep up with weeds in common areas (more on that below.)
         
        3)  Communication among members
        A)  Tahlequah Community Garden Yahoo Group for group email communications.  (The address is in the To: line of this message.)
        B)  Phone numbers are listed on the plot map inserted in the front cover of the binder kept in the tool shed.
         
        4)  Weed control in common areas:
        A)  We have decided to eliminate the group compost area & to let each grower create their own compost.
        B)  We will eliminate the walkways around the edge (fenceline) and extend the beds to the fenceline. (That way, there is no space for weeds to grow along the fenceline inside the garden.)
        We will have one wide pathway running East to West from the gate to the shed, and one North to South pathway running down the middle of the garden.
        C)  Use of the wet newspaper (black & white printed pages (color pics on those pages are ok) but NO GLOSSY pages, print-free cardboard, leaves and woodchips (but take take to avoid walnut) is encouraged as mulch to keep weeds down in pathways.
        D) We will put the manifold of the irrigation system inside the fence and we will curl the bottom edges of the fence under toward the inside of the garden so that it is safe to mow closely to the fence.
        E)  If there is still a need for weed-eating, Sue will coordinate that effort.  Everyone, please take a turn so that no one person gets overwhelmed.
         
        5) Prevention of waste
        A) If you are traveling, sick, busy at work, otherwise having a life event that prevents you from keeping up with your plot, you are responsible to call or email Sue Catron 207-6379  sue.catron@... and/or TahlequahCommunityGarden@yahoogroups.com so that Sue can coordinate your harvest while you are gone.
        B) If you fail to follow step 5A and food is ready for picking in your plot, Sue will try to contact you by email and phone (provided your number is on the plot map.)  If you fail to respond within 24 hrs, Sue will coordinate your harvest until you notify her that you can once again keep up with it.
         
        6) Community herb row:
        A)  We will shift the community herb row south to run adjacent to Sue's edging.  This will make the East-West path into the garden wider.
        (Sue has already started to move the herb row and has requested feedback--it's not too late to change our plan of one E-W and one N-S path.)
        B)  We will label the herbs and try to clearly denote the community herb row on the plot map.
         
        7)  Fundraiser:
        A) If we need to raise additional funds, all participants will do their best to help with a fundraiser.  Two ideas have thus far been proposed:
        i)  A harvest-festival type of local food celebration--fundraising by preparing & selling a local food dinner
        ii) Selling excess produce at the Tahlequah Farmer's Market (note that Julie is unable to commit to selling at the Tahlequah Farmer's Market this year, so other growers would have to do this.)
         
        8)  Judith Anderson, Friend of the Community Garden, has offered to transport our food to the CARE Food Pantry once again this year. 
        A) If you are unable to transport your donations to the CARE Food Pantry yourself, just leave it on Judith's porch at 411 West Keetoowah.
             Judith's phone number is:  458 1885
        B) Judith would like to take the produce by 10:00 am Mon, Wed, or Fri, so you can either leave it on her porch early those mornings or the prior evenings.
         
        If I receive no strong protest, theses items will be added to the 2010 Tahlequah Community Garden Ground Rules Agreed Upon By Growers and that document will be our 2011 Tahlequah Community Garden Ground Rules Agreed Upon By Growers.
        Please respond to this email if you think anything else needs to be documented in our groundrules.
         
        Wishing you a happy, bountiful 2011 growing season,
        Julie
        207-9107
         
         
        Julie Gahn
        Coordinator, Tahlequah Community Garden
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TahlequahCommunityGarden/
        Board Member, Sustainable Tahlequah
        http://www.sustainabletahlequah.org/


        Also see:
        Oklahoma Food Cooperative
        http://www.oklahomafood.coop/
        Sustainable Green Country
        http://www.sustainablegreencountry.org/main/
        Oklahoma Sustainability Network
        http://www.oksustainability.org/

        u
      • Tami SOTO
        Re cover crops: austrian winter peas are good sown in fall as they fix nitrogen in the soil, oat grass looks pretty in the fall/ make good mulch when they die
        Message 3 of 16 , Feb 1 3:50 PM
        • 0 Attachment
          Re cover crops: austrian winter peas are good sown in fall as they fix nitrogen in the soil,
          oat grass looks pretty in the fall/ make good mulch when they die back in winter.
          For more info on local cover crops ask Doug Walton his contact info is at the following page:

          On Feb 1, 2011, at 4:44 PM, Denise LaGrand wrote:

           

          I am hoping the garden members may have some ideas of good cover crops for this area. I will not be planting my home garden this year, and would like to plant an early cover crop to be tilled back in, and others successively planted throughout the season and into the fall. My main goal is weed control while the plot is fallow, with secondary goals of improving the soil.  Any ideas appreciated

          Sent from my iPhone

          On Jan 30, 2011, at 7:39 PM, Julie Gahn <juliegahn@...> wrote:


          ****************************************************************
           
          Hello all,
           
          Four of us communicated about the operation of the Tahlequah Community Garden either by email or in person today.
           
          You will notice below that Sue Catron has agreed to take on much of the daily/weekly oversight of the garden.  Please help her out.  We are trying this so that I might have enough time to start additional community gardens.  (In other words, my goal is to have an on-site coordinator at each garden, and my work will move up a level and be focused on ensuring we have enough tools, fencing, compost, etc etc to get started at each garden.  Once a garden is started and has committed participants, each one should become fairly smooth-ru nning.)  We're going to test the idea here in the first community garden this year.  If we're successful, I'll try to start another garden next year.
           
          I will be contacting everyone to find out how much space you want in next year's garden before I put a public notice in the paper to offer space to new gardeners.  Please let  me know as soon as possible how much space you want so that we can let new gardeners plant February crops if they so desire.
           
          In addition to our 2010 Tahlequah Community Garden Ground Rules Agreed Upon By Growers (copy can be found in binder in shed), we've developed the following plans for the 2011 garden:
           
          1) Sue Catron volunteered to be the on-site coordinator for the garden.  Thank you Sue!
          Her phone number is 207-6379. Her email is: sue.catron@...
           
          2) Sue will be the first point of contact for:
          A)  Questions about the irrigation system
          B)  Inform Sue of any reason that you will not be able to keep up with your plot for any length of time.  Sue will coordinate an effort to ensure no food goes to waste by ensuring someone does the harvest & donates the food to the CARE Food Pantry.
          C)  Coordinate effort to keep up with weeds in common areas (more on that below.)
           
          3)  Communication among members
          A)  Tahlequah Community Garden Yahoo Group for group email communications.  (The address is in the To: line of this message.)
          B)  Phone numbers are listed on the plot map inserted in the front cover of the binder kept in the tool shed.
           
          4)  Weed control in common areas:
          A)  We h ave decided to eliminate the group compost area & to let each grower create their own compost.
          B)  We will eliminate the walkways around the edge (fenceline) and extend the beds to the fenceline. (That way, there is no space for weeds to grow along the fenceline inside the garden.)
          We will have one wide pathway running East to West from the gate to the shed, and one North to South pathway running down the middle of the garden.
          C)  Use of the wet newspaper (black & white printed pages (color pics on those pages are ok) but NO GLOSSY pages, print-free cardboard, leaves and woodchips (but take take to avoid walnut) is encouraged as mulch to keep weeds down in pathways.
          D) We will put the manifold of the irrigation system inside the fence and we will curl the bottom edges of the fence under toward the inside of the garden so that it is safe to mow closely to the fence.
          E)  If there is still a need for weed-eating, Sue will coordinate that effort.  Everyone, please take a turn so that no one person gets overwhelmed.
           
          5) Prevention of waste
          A) If you are traveling, sick, busy at work, otherwise having a life event that prevents you from keeping up with your plot, you are responsible to call or email Sue Catron 207-6379  sue.catron@... and/or TahlequahCommunityGarden@yahoogroups.com so that Sue can coordinate your harvest while you are gone.
          B) If you fail to follow step 5A and food is ready for picking in your plot, S ue will try to contact you by email and phone (provided your number is on the plot map.)  If you fail to respond within 24 hrs, Sue will coordinate your harvest until you notify her that you can once again keep up with it.
           
          6) Community herb row:
          A)  We will shift the community herb row south to run adjacent to Sue's edging.  This will make the East-West path into the garden wider.
          (Sue has already started to move the herb row and has requested feedback--it's not too late to change our plan of one E-W and one N-S path.)
          B)  We will label the herbs and try to clearly denote the community herb row on the plot map.
           
          7)  Fundraiser:
          A) If we need to raise additional funds, all participants will do their best to help with a fundraiser.  Two ideas have thus far been proposed:
          i)  A harvest-festival type of local food celebration--fundraising by preparing & selling a local food dinner
          ii) Selling excess produce at the Tahlequah Farmer's Market (note that Julie is unable to commit to selling at the Tahlequah Farmer's Market this year, so other growers would have to do this.)
           
          8)  Judith Anderson, Friend of the Community Garden, has offered to transport our food to the CARE Food Pantry once again this year. 
          A) If you are unable to transport your donations to the CARE Food Pantry yourself, just leave it on Judith's porch at 411 West Keetoowah.
               Judith's phone number is:  458 1885
          B) Judith would like to take the produce by 10:00 am Mon, Wed, or Fri, so you can either leave it on her porch early those mornings or the prior evenings.
           
          If I receive no strong protest, theses items will be added to the 2010 Tahlequah Community Garden Ground Rules Agreed Upon By Growers and that document will be our 2011 Tahlequah Community Garden Ground Rules Agreed Upon By Growers.
          Please respond to this email if you think anything else needs to be documented in our groundrules.
           
          Wishing you a happy, bountiful 2011 growing season,
          Julie
          207-9107
           
           
          Julie Gahn
          Coordinator, Tahlequah Community Garden
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TahlequahCommunityGarden/
          Board Member, Sustainable Tahlequah
          http://www.sustainabletahlequah.org/


          Also see:
          Oklahoma Food Cooperative
          http://www.oklahomafood.coop/
          Sustainable Green Country
          http://www.sustainablegreencountry.org/main/
          Oklahoma Sustainability Network
          http://www.oksustainability.org/

          u


        • Julie Gahn
          I am hoping the garden members may have some ideas of good cover crops for this area Are you referring to the community garden or your home garden for the need
          Message 4 of 16 , Feb 1 5:09 PM
          • 0 Attachment
            I am hoping the garden members may have some ideas of good cover crops for this area

            Are you referring to the community garden or your home garden for the need for cover crops?

            I do have notes that I pulled from an Elliot Coleman book and some other ideas that I've learned since then...just have to dig up my notes.  Off the top of my head, I've been using Austrian peas and rye for winter cover crops, buckwheat can be used as a cover between summer and fall crops, I just don't remember how early in the spring it can be planted, but it might work. Ive been told cow peas (good in heat) can even hold off Bermuda grass, a type of vetch is good after tomatoes (need those notes), oats can be used and there's a biennial sweet clover that can be used if you have a spot that won't be used for two years. Comfrey would also be good-it has a deep root that pulls up minerals, and my understanding is you can cut it back and use it for mulch. I'll be planting comfrey this year.

            I'll try to find my detailed notes (we're still in the middle of a move, otherwise I'd have them at my fingertips.)

            Julie  

            On Feb 1, 2011, at 4:44 PM, Denise LaGrand <deniselagrand@...> wrote:

             

            I am hoping the garden members may have some ideas of good cover crops for this area. I will not be planting my home garden this year, and would like to plant an early cover crop to be tilled back in, and others successively planted throughout the season and into the fall. My main goal is weed control while the plot is fallow, with secondary goals of improving the soil.  Any ideas appreciated

            Sent from my iPhone

            On Jan 30, 2011, at 7:39 PM, Julie Gahn <juliegahn@...> wrote:

            ****************************************************************
             
            Hello all,
             
            Four of us communicated about the operation of the Tahlequah Community Garden either by email or in person today.
             
            You will notice below that Sue Catron has agreed to take on much of the daily/weekly oversight of the garden.  Please help her out.  We are trying this so that I might have enough time to start additional community gardens.  (In other words, my goal is to have an on-site coordinator at each garden, and my work will move up a level and be focused on ensuring we have enough tools, fencing, compost, etc etc to get started at each garden.  Once a garden is started and has committed participants, each one should become fairly smooth-running.)  We're going to test the idea here in the first community garden this year.  If we're successful, I'll try to start another garden next year.
             
            I will be contacting everyone to find out how much space you want in next year's garden before I put a public notice in the paper to offer space to new gardeners.  Please let  me know as soon as possible how much space you want so that we can let new gardeners plant February crops if they so desire.
             
            In addition to our 2010 Tahlequah Community Garden Ground Rules Agreed Upon By Growers (copy can be found in binder in shed), we've developed the following plans for the 2011 garden:
             
            1) Sue Catron volunteered to be the on-site coordinator for the garden.  Thank you Sue!
            Her phone number is 207-6379. Her email is: sue.catron@...
             
            2) Sue will be the first point of contact for:
            A)  Questions about the irrigation system
            B)  Inform Sue of any reason that you will not be able to keep up with your plot for any length of time.  Sue will coordinate an effort to ensure no food goes to waste by ensuring someone does the harvest & donates the food to the CARE Food Pantry.
            C)  Coordinate effort to keep up with weeds in common areas (more on that below.)
             
            3)  Communication among members
            A)  Tahlequah Community Garden Yahoo Group for group email communications.  (The address is in the To: line of this message.)
            B)  Phone numbers are listed on the plot map inserted in the front cover of the binder kept in the tool shed.
             
            4)  Weed control in common areas:
            A)  We have decided to eliminate the group compost area & to let each grower create their own compost.
            B)  We will eliminate the walkways around the edge (fenceline) and extend the beds to the fenceline. (That way, there is no space for weeds to grow along the fenceline inside the garden.)
            We will have one wide pathway running East to West from the gate to the shed, and one North to South pathway running down the middle of the garden.
            C)  Use of the wet newspaper (black & white printed pages (color pics on those pages are ok) but NO GLOSSY pages, print-free cardboard, leaves and woodchips (but take take to avoid walnut) is encouraged as mulch to keep weeds down in pathways.
            D) We will put the manifold of the irrigation system inside the fence and we will curl the bottom edges of the fence under toward the inside of the garden so that it is safe to mow closely to the fence.
            E)  If there is still a need for weed-eating, Sue will coordinate that effort.  Everyone, please take a turn so that no one person gets overwhelmed.
             
            5) Prevention of waste
            A) If you are traveling, sick, busy at work, otherwise having a life event that prevents you from keeping up with your plot, you are responsible to call or email Sue Catron 207-6379  sue.catron@... and/or TahlequahCommunityGarden@yahoogroups.com so that Sue can coordinate your harvest while you are gone.
            B) If you fail to follow step 5A and food is ready for picking in your plot, Sue will try to contact you by email and phone (provided your number is on the plot map.)  If you fail to respond within 24 hrs, Sue will coordinate your harvest until you notify her that you can once again keep up with it.
             
            6) Community herb row:
            A)  We will shift the community herb row south to run adjacent to Sue's edging.  This will make the East-West path into the garden wider.
            (Sue has already started to move the herb row and has requested feedback--it's not too late to change our plan of one E-W and one N-S path.)
            B)  We will label the herbs and try to clearly denote the community herb row on the plot map.
             
            7)  Fundraiser:
            A) If we need to raise additional funds, all participants will do their best to help with a fundraiser.  Two ideas have thus far been proposed:
            i)  A harvest-festival type of local food celebration--fundraising by preparing & selling a local food dinner
            ii) Selling excess produce at the Tahlequah Farmer's Market (note that Julie is unable to commit to selling at the Tahlequah Farmer's Market this year, so other growers would have to do this.)
             
            8)  Judith Anderson, Friend of the Community Garden, has offered to transport our food to the CARE Food Pantry once again this year. 
            A) If you are unable to transport your donations to the CARE Food Pantry yourself, just leave it on Judith's porch at 411 West Keetoowah.
                 Judith's phone number is:  458 1885
            B) Judith would like to take the produce by 10:00 am Mon, Wed, or Fri, so you can either leave it on her porch early those mornings or the prior evenings.
             
            If I receive no strong protest, theses items will be added to the 2010 Tahlequah Community Garden Ground Rules Agreed Upon By Growers and that document will be our 2011 Tahlequah Community Garden Ground Rules Agreed Upon By Growers.
            Please respond to this email if you think anything else needs to be documented in our groundrules.
             
            Wishing you a happy, bountiful 2011 growing season,
            Julie
            207-9107
             
             
            Julie Gahn
            Coordinator, Tahlequah Community Garden
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TahlequahCommunityGarden/
            Board Member, Sustainable Tahlequah
            http://www.sustainabletahlequah.org/


            Also see:
            Oklahoma Food Cooperative
            http://www.oklahomafood.coop/
            Sustainable Green Country
            http://www.sustainablegreencountry.org/main/
            Oklahoma Sustainability Network
            http://www.oksustainability.org/

            u

          • Denise LaGrand
            The cover crop is for my home garden. I am hoping for a spot in the com garden I will share with 2 others (one who has just returned to Tahlequah and was on a
            Message 5 of 16 , Feb 2 9:09 AM
            • 0 Attachment
              The cover crop is for my home garden. I am hoping for a spot in the com garden I will share with 2 others (one who has just returned to Tahlequah and was on a 3-year waiting list for the com garden where she lived in Colorado!) while mine is fallow, I am hoping to combat the worst of my invasive weeds-bermuda crabgrass and bind weed through use of successive cover crops for the next year. Good luck with ur move:)

              Sent from my iPhone

              On Feb 1, 2011, at 7:09 PM, Julie Gahn <juliegahn@...> wrote:

               

              I am hoping the garden members may have some ideas of good cover crops for this area

              Are you referring to the community garden or your home garden for the need for cover crops?

              I do have notes that I pulled from an Elliot Coleman book and some other ideas that I've learned since then...just have to dig up my notes.  Off the top of my head, I've been using Austrian peas and rye for winter cover crops, buckwheat can be used as a cover between summer and fall crops, I just don't remember how early in the spring it can be planted, but it might work. Ive been told cow peas (good in heat) can even hold off Bermuda grass, a type of vetch is good after tomatoes (need those notes), oats can be used and there's a biennial sweet clover that can be used if you have a spot that won't be used for two years. Comfrey would also be good-it has a deep root that pulls up minerals, and my understanding is you can cut it back and use it for mulch. I'll be planting comfrey this year.

              I'll try to find my detailed notes (we're still in the middle of a move, otherwise I'd have them at my fingertips.)

              Julie  

              On Feb 1, 2011, at 4:44 PM, Denise LaGrand <deniselagrand@...> wrote:

               

              I am hoping the garden members may have some ideas of good cover crops for this area. I will not be planting my home garden this year, and would like to plant an early cover crop to be tilled back in, and others successively planted throughout the season and into the fall. My main goal is weed control while the plot is fallow, with secondary goals of improving the soil.  Any ideas appreciated

              Sent from my iPhone

              On Jan 30, 2011, at 7:39 PM, Julie Gahn <juliegahn@...> wrote:

              ****************************************************************
               
              Hello all,
               
              Four of us communicated about the operation of the Tahlequah Community Garden either by email or in person today.
               
              You will notice below that Sue Catron has agreed to take on much of the daily/weekly oversight of the garden.  Please help her out.  We are trying this so that I might have enough time to start additional community gardens.  (In other words, my goal is to have an on-site coordinator at each garden, and my work will move up a level and be focused on ensuring we have enough tools, fencing, compost, etc etc to get started at each garden.  Once a garden is started and has committed participants, each one should become fairly smooth-running.)  We're going to test the idea here in the first community garden this year.  If we're successful, I'll try to start another garden next year.
               
              I will be contacting everyone to find out how much space you want in next year's garden before I put a public notice in the paper to offer space to new gardeners.  Please let  me know as soon as possible how much space you want so that we can let new gardeners plant February crops if they so desire.
               
              In addition to our 2010 Tahlequah Community Garden Ground Rules Agreed Upon By Growers (copy can be found in binder in shed), we've developed the following plans for the 2011 garden:
               
              1) Sue Catron volunteered to be the on-site coordinator for the garden.  Thank you Sue!
              Her phone number is 207-6379. Her email is: sue.catron@...
               
              2) Sue will be the first point of contact for:
              A)  Questions about the irrigation system
              B)  Inform Sue of any reason that you will not be able to keep up with your plot for any length of time.  Sue will coordinate an effort to ensure no food goes to waste by ensuring someone does the harvest & donates the food to the CARE Food Pantry.
              C)  Coordinate effort to keep up with weeds in common areas (more on that below.)
               
              3)  Communication among members
              A)  Tahlequah Community Garden Yahoo Group for group email communications.  (The address is in the To: line of this message.)
              B)  Phone numbers are listed on the plot map inserted in the front cover of the binder kept in the tool shed.
               
              4)  Weed control in common areas:
              A)  We have decided to eliminate the group compost area & to let each grower create their own compost.
              B)  We will eliminate the walkways around the edge (fenceline) and extend the beds to the fenceline. (That way, there is no space for weeds to grow along the fenceline inside the garden.)
              We will have one wide pathway running East to West from the gate to the shed, and one North to South pathway running down the middle of the garden.
              C)  Use of the wet newspaper (black & white printed pages (color pics on those pages are ok) but NO GLOSSY pages, print-free cardboard, leaves and woodchips (but take take to avoid walnut) is encouraged as mulch to keep weeds down in pathways.
              D) We will put the manifold of the irrigation system inside the fence and we will curl the bottom edges of the fence under toward the inside of the garden so that it is safe to mow closely to the fence.
              E)  If there is still a need for weed-eating, Sue will coordinate that effort.  Everyone, please take a turn so that no one person gets overwhelmed.
               
              5) Prevention of waste
              A) If you are traveling, sick, busy at work, otherwise having a life event that prevents you from keeping up with your plot, you are responsible to call or email Sue Catron 207-6379  sue.catron@... and/or TahlequahCommunityGarden@yahoogroups.com so that Sue can coordinate your harvest while you are gone.
              B) If you fail to follow step 5A and food is ready for picking in your plot, Sue will try to contact you by email and phone (provided your number is on the plot map.)  If you fail to respond within 24 hrs, Sue will coordinate your harvest until you notify her that you can once again keep up with it.
               
              6) Community herb row:
              A)  We will shift the community herb row south to run adjacent to Sue's edging.  This will make the East-West path into the garden wider.
              (Sue has already started to move the herb row and has requested feedback--it's not too late to change our plan of one E-W and one N-S path.)
              B)  We will label the herbs and try to clearly denote the community herb row on the plot map.
               
              7)  Fundraiser:
              A) If we need to raise additional funds, all participants will do their best to help with a fundraiser.  Two ideas have thus far been proposed:
              i)  A harvest-festival type of local food celebration--fundraising by preparing & selling a local food dinner
              ii) Selling excess produce at the Tahlequah Farmer's Market (note that Julie is unable to commit to selling at the Tahlequah Farmer's Market this year, so other growers would have to do this.)
               
              8)  Judith Anderson, Friend of the Community Garden, has offered to transport our food to the CARE Food Pantry once again this year. 
              A) If you are unable to transport your donations to the CARE Food Pantry yourself, just leave it on Judith's porch at 411 West Keetoowah.
                   Judith's phone number is:  458 1885
              B) Judith would like to take the produce by 10:00 am Mon, Wed, or Fri, so you can either leave it on her porch early those mornings or the prior evenings.
               
              If I receive no strong protest, theses items will be added to the 2010 Tahlequah Community Garden Ground Rules Agreed Upon By Growers and that document will be our 2011 Tahlequah Community Garden Ground Rules Agreed Upon By Growers.
              Please respond to this email if you think anything else needs to be documented in our groundrules.
               
              Wishing you a happy, bountiful 2011 growing season,
              Julie
              207-9107
               
               
              Julie Gahn
              Coordinator, Tahlequah Community Garden
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TahlequahCommunityGarden/
              Board Member, Sustainable Tahlequah
              http://www.sustainabletahlequah.org/


              Also see:
              Oklahoma Food Cooperative
              http://www.oklahomafood.coop/
              Sustainable Green Country
              http://www.sustainablegreencountry.org/main/
              Oklahoma Sustainability Network
              http://www.oksustainability.org/

              u

            • kg8da
              Julie, Buckwheat is very sensitive to frost, so, for a spring planting (which is the only time it is considered able to outgrow the weeds) one must plant as
              Message 6 of 16 , Feb 3 11:10 AM
              • 0 Attachment
                Julie,

                Buckwheat is very sensitive to frost, so, for a spring planting (which is the only time it is considered able to outgrow the weeds) one must plant as soon as danger of frost is over. Then, it must be cut before producing seed, or it will volunteer (something which never bothered me anyway).

                Comfrey is a bully. It is tenacious and grows back from root fragments. I grow it. But I would be hesitant to plant a lot of it.

                Cowpeas make a great cover crop for our climate and conditions. One thing which has worked well for me, in "cutting Bermuda down to size" is to plant a good sturdy field corn and then plant the edges of the corn with climbing cowpeas. The corn, if planted before the real heat of July hits, will outgrow and shade the Bermuda. One only needs to hoe and hill it, perhaps twice, before the weeds cannot keep up. I use about 4' space between rows and about 18" between corn plants. Another option would be to plant the corn much farther apart, say 2 1/2 to 3' between plants and plant rows of cowpeas between the corn. This would work well as long as the corn is of a super sturdy variety. NO SWEET CORN will work for supporting real climbing beans or cowpeas. The stalks are too weak.

                Here is a link to just one company which has a good many open pollinated corns. One would want to look for a description which states "strong stalks" or "resistant to lodging." I grow both Cherokee Squaw and Mesquakie Indian. Both are very good for supporting beans and cowpeas.

                I've planted Penney Rile Cowpea and Black Crowder on corn. The Zongozotla Pintitos cowpeas I handed out last spring would do well on corn, and for smothering weeds. One just wants a cowpea which will also climb. Unfortunately, varietal descriptions often fail to include this information. At least most cowpeas I've grown, if given something to climb, will go at least 6-8' up. If not given something to climb, some will stay quite bushy and low. Something like Red Ripper is known to reach up to 20' in length and was traditionally used to smother weeds. I haven't grown Red Ripper. But I have plenty of seed if anyone would like to try it. I'll just have to do a germination test, as it is at least two years old.

                My Internet allowance is about out, until Monday. So I won't be checking email that much, til then...

                George

                --- In TahlequahCommunityGarden@yahoogroups.com, Julie Gahn <juliegahn@...> wrote:
                >
                > I am hoping the garden members may have some ideas of good cover crops for this area
                >
                > Are you referring to the community garden or your home garden for the need for cover crops?
                >
                > I do have notes that I pulled from an Elliot Coleman book and some other ideas that I've learned since then...just have to dig up my notes. Off the top of my head, I've been using Austrian peas and rye for winter cover crops, buckwheat can be used as a cover between summer and fall crops, I just don't remember how early in the spring it can be planted, but it might work. Ive been told cow peas (good in heat) can even hold off Bermuda grass, a type of vetch is good after tomatoes (need those notes), oats can be used and there's a biennial sweet clover that can be used if you have a spot that won't be used for two years. Comfrey would also be good-it has a deep root that pulls up minerals, and my understanding is you can cut it back and use it for mulch. I'll be planting comfrey this year.
                >
                > I'll try to find my detailed notes (we're still in the middle of a move, otherwise I'd have them at my fingertips.)
                >
                > Julie
                >
              • Denise LaGrand
                Great info. As soon as I m home from Vermont I will sift thru it and make my choices. Do u kno if theres space in the garden? Should I contact sue? I ve had no
                Message 7 of 16 , Feb 3 9:48 PM
                • 0 Attachment
                  Great info. As soon as I'm home from Vermont I will sift thru it and make my choices. Do u kno if theres space in the garden? Should I contact sue? I've had no reply to that post

                  Sent from my iPhone

                  On Feb 3, 2011, at 1:10 PM, "kg8da" <kg8da@...> wrote:

                   



                  Julie,

                  Buckwheat is very sensitive to frost, so, for a spring planting (which is the only time it is considered able to outgrow the weeds) one must plant as soon as danger of frost is over. Then, it must be cut before producing seed, or it will volunteer (something which never bothered me anyway).

                  Comfrey is a bully. It is tenacious and grows back from root fragments. I grow it. But I would be hesitant to plant a lot of it.

                  Cowpeas make a great cover crop for our climate and conditions. One thing which has worked well for me, in "cutting Bermuda down to size" is to plant a good sturdy field corn and then plant the edges of the corn with climbing cowpeas. The corn, if planted before the real heat of July hits, will outgrow and shade the Bermuda. One only needs to hoe and hill it, perhaps twice, before the weeds cannot keep up. I use about 4' space between rows and about 18" between corn plants. Another option would be to plant the corn much farther apart, say 2 1/2 to 3' between plants and plant rows of cowpeas between the corn. This would work well as long as the corn is of a super sturdy variety. NO SWEET CORN will work for supporting real climbing beans or cowpeas. The stalks are too weak.

                  Here is a link to just one company which has a good many open pollinated corns. One would want to look for a description which states "strong stalks" or "resistant to lodging." I grow both Cherokee Squaw and Mesquakie Indian. Both are very good for supporting beans and cowpeas.

                  I've planted Penney Rile Cowpea and Black Crowder on corn. The Zongozotla Pintitos cowpeas I handed out last spring would do well on corn, and for smothering weeds. One just wants a cowpea which will also climb. Unfortunately, varietal descriptions often fail to include this information. At least most cowpeas I've grown, if given something to climb, will go at least 6-8' up. If not given something to climb, some will stay quite bushy and low. Something like Red Ripper is known to reach up to 20' in length and was traditionally used to smother weeds. I haven't grown Red Ripper. But I have plenty of seed if anyone would like to try it. I'll just have to do a germination test, as it is at least two years old.

                  My Internet allowance is about out, until Monday. So I won't be checking email that much, til then...

                  George

                  --- In TahlequahCommunityGarden@yahoogroups.com, Julie Gahn <juliegahn@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I am hoping the garden members may have some ideas of good cover crops for this area
                  >
                  > Are you referring to the community garden or your home garden for the need for cover crops?
                  >
                  > I do have notes that I pulled from an Elliot Coleman book and some other ideas that I've learned since then...just have to dig up my notes. Off the top of my head, I've been using Austrian peas and rye for winter cover crops, buckwheat can be used as a cover between summer and fall crops, I just don't remember how early in the spring it can be planted, but it might work. Ive been told cow peas (good in heat) can even hold off Bermuda grass, a type of vetch is good after tomatoes (need those notes), oats can be used and there's a biennial sweet clover that can be used if you have a spot that won't be used for two years. Comfrey would also be good-it has a deep root that pulls up minerals, and my understanding is you can cut it back and use it for mulch. I'll be planting comfrey this year.
                  >
                  > I'll try to find my detailed notes (we're still in the middle of a move, otherwise I'd have them at my fingertips.)
                  >
                  > Julie
                  >

                • Julie Gahn
                  George, Would the field corn/climbing cow pea method you describe below also work with squash as a ground cover in a three sisters type of planting? Thanks,
                  Message 8 of 16 , Feb 21 7:17 PM
                  • 0 Attachment
                    George,

                    Would the field corn/climbing cow pea method you describe below also work with squash as a ground cover in a three sisters type of planting?

                    Thanks, 
                    Julie

                    On Feb 3, 2011, at 1:10 PM, "kg8da" <kg8da@...> wrote:

                     



                    Julie,

                    Buckwheat is very sensitive to frost, so, for a spring planting (which is the only time it is considered able to outgrow the weeds) one must plant as soon as danger of frost is over. Then, it must be cut before producing seed, or it will volunteer (something which never bothered me anyway).

                    Comfrey is a bully. It is tenacious and grows back from root fragments. I grow it. But I would be hesitant to plant a lot of it.

                    Cowpeas make a great cover crop for our climate and conditions. One thing which has worked well for me, in "cutting Bermuda down to size" is to plant a good sturdy field corn and then plant the edges of the corn with climbing cowpeas. The corn, if planted before the real heat of July hits, will outgrow and shade the Bermuda. One only needs to hoe and hill it, perhaps twice, before the weeds cannot keep up. I use about 4' space between rows and about 18" between corn plants. Another option would be to plant the corn much farther apart, say 2 1/2 to 3' between plants and plant rows of cowpeas between the corn. This would work well as long as the corn is of a super sturdy variety. NO SWEET CORN will work for supporting real climbing beans or cowpeas. The stalks are too weak.

                    Here is a link to just one company which has a good many open pollinated corns. One would want to look for a description which states "strong stalks" or "resistant to lodging." I grow both Cherokee Squaw and Mesquakie Indian. Both are very good for supporting beans and cowpeas.

                    I've planted Penney Rile Cowpea and Black Crowder on corn. The Zongozotla Pintitos cowpeas I handed out last spring would do well on corn, and for smothering weeds. One just wants a cowpea which will also climb. Unfortunately, varietal descriptions often fail to include this information. At least most cowpeas I've grown, if given something to climb, will go at least 6-8' up. If not given something to climb, some will stay quite bushy and low. Something like Red Ripper is known to reach up to 20' in length and was traditionally used to smother weeds. I haven't grown Red Ripper. But I have plenty of seed if anyone would like to try it. I'll just have to do a germination test, as it is at least two years old.

                    My Internet allowance is about out, until Monday. So I won't be checking email that much, til then...

                    George

                    --- In TahlequahCommunityGarden@yahoogroups.com, Julie Gahn <juliegahn@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I am hoping the garden members may have some ideas of good cover crops for this area
                    >
                    > Are you referring to the community garden or your home garden for the need for cover crops?
                    >
                    > I do have notes that I pulled from an Elliot Coleman book and some other ideas that I've learned since then...just have to dig up my notes. Off the top of my head, I've been using Austrian peas and rye for winter cover crops, buckwheat can be used as a cover between summer and fall crops, I just don't remember how early in the spring it can be planted, but it might work. Ive been told cow peas (good in heat) can even hold off Bermuda grass, a type of vetch is good after tomatoes (need those notes), oats can be used and there's a biennial sweet clover that can be used if you have a spot that won't be used for two years. Comfrey would also be good-it has a deep root that pulls up minerals, and my understanding is you can cut it back and use it for mulch. I'll be planting comfrey this year.
                    >
                    > I'll try to find my detailed notes (we're still in the middle of a move, otherwise I'd have them at my fingertips.)
                    >
                    > Julie
                    >

                  • kg8da
                    Yes Julie, it would. However, it is important to remember a couple of things about three sisters style gardening. 1) Sweet corn will almost NEVER support
                    Message 9 of 16 , Feb 22 2:31 AM
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Yes Julie, it would. However, it is important to remember a couple of things about three sisters style gardening.

                      1) Sweet corn will almost NEVER support climbing beans. The genes which cause sweetness are also responsible for WEAK STALKS. So, if one really wants to plant these three crops together, it will be necessary to grow a half runner type of bean with the corn, so as not to tear it down.

                      2) When planting beans on corn. It is only possible to do this on the outside edges f the South, East and West edges of the corn, unless the corn is space much further apart than usual. In the Resilient Gardener Carol Deppe mentions the only bean I've ever heard of which can thrive in the shade of a corn patch. (Can't remember it nor lay hands on it at the moment).

                      3) The same holds true for squash and corn. Plant the squash on the outside of the corn patch and let it "invade" as able. Plus, if using sweet corn, be careful that your squash isn't so vigorous as to inundate the corn.

                      I'll get back with you with more info soon. Been kind of busy here ;)

                      George

                      --- In TahlequahCommunityGarden@yahoogroups.com, Julie Gahn <juliegahn@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > George,
                      >
                      > Would the field corn/climbing cow pea method you describe below also work with squash as a ground cover in a three sisters type of planting?
                      >
                      > Thanks,
                      > Julie
                      >
                      >
                    • kg8da@juno.com
                      Here s one more bit of info: a link to a thread on beans & corn. I believe this thread contains even more useful links. George
                      Message 10 of 16 , Feb 22 3:26 AM
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                        Here's one more bit of info: a link to a thread on beans & corn. I believe this thread contains even more useful links.

                        George

                        http://forums2.gardenweb.com/forums/load/cornucop/msg1011095625390.html


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                        Mom Reveals Shocking $5 method for erasing wrinkles...Doctors hate her
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                      • Julie Gahn
                        Thanks much, George. We greatly appreciate any time and info you re able to share! Julie On Feb 22, 2011, at 4:31 AM, kg8da wrote: Yes
                        Message 11 of 16 , Feb 22 6:09 AM
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Thanks much, George. We greatly appreciate any time and info you're able to share!

                          Julie

                          On Feb 22, 2011, at 4:31 AM, "kg8da" <kg8da@...> wrote:

                           

                          Yes Julie, it would. However, it is important to remember a couple of things about three sisters style gardening.

                          1) Sweet corn will almost NEVER support climbing beans. The genes which cause sweetness are also responsible for WEAK STALKS. So, if one really wants to plant these three crops together, it will be necessary to grow a half runner type of bean with the corn, so as not to tear it down.

                          2) When planting beans on corn. It is only possible to do this on the outside edges f the South, East and West edges of the corn, unless the corn is space much further apart than usual. In the Resilient Gardener Carol Deppe mentions the only bean I've ever heard of which can thrive in the shade of a corn patch. (Can't remember it nor lay hands on it at the moment).

                          3) The same holds true for squash and corn. Plant the squash on the outside of the corn patch and let it "invade" as able. Plus, if using sweet corn, be careful that your squash isn't so vigorous as to inundate the corn.

                          I'll get back with you with more info soon. Been kind of busy here ;)

                          George

                          --- In TahlequahCommunityGarden@yahoogroups.com, Julie Gahn <juliegahn@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > George,
                          >
                          > Would the field corn/climbing cow pea method you describe below also work with squash as a ground cover in a three sisters type of planting?
                          >
                          > Thanks,
                          > Julie
                          >
                          >

                        • kg8da
                          Uh, I just read your question more carefully. The answer is more simple than I thought. Yes. A climbing cowpea can be used in place of, or along with a regular
                          Message 12 of 16 , Feb 22 7:02 AM
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Uh, I just read your question more carefully. The answer is more simple than I thought. Yes. A climbing cowpea can be used in place of, or along with a regular climbing bean. Just remember that different varieties, of both species have varying degrees of vigor, just as is the case with both corn and squash. So, one must experiment to find the right combination.

                            George

                            --- In TahlequahCommunityGarden@yahoogroups.com, Julie Gahn <juliegahn@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > George,
                            >
                            > Would the field corn/climbing cow pea method you describe below also work with squash as a ground cover in a three sisters type of planting?
                            >
                            > Thanks,
                            > Julie
                            >
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