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Which are we talking about (Type-bars or sub-levers)?

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  • dax@surewest.net
    Are we talking about type-bars or sub-levers when making reference to early Remington or Caligraph type-writers? Not sure I know of such a type-writer. I
    Message 1 of 11 , May 7, 2011
      Are we talking about type-bars or sub-levers when making reference to early
      Remington or Caligraph type-writers? Not sure I know of such a type-writer.
      I believe most all very early Remington and Caligraph type-writers had metal
      type-bars and wood sub-levers (something to do with alignment). It would
      seem the wood type-bars would soon find themselves out of alignment and thus
      would find themselves on a junk pile. Perhaps someone on the list knows of
      such a machine. Check with DR.



      Dax

      _____

      From: TYPEWRITERS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TYPEWRITERS@yahoogroups.com] On
      Behalf Of raycy.japan
      Sent: Friday, May 06, 2011 11:45 PM
      To: TYPEWRITERS@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Which are we talking about (Type - bars or sub - levers)?





      > I never saw one, alas - perhaps some had one and some the other.
      > I know
      > from direct observation that the Caligraph #2 has wooden keylevers.

      Wooden ., may one reason of light weight.. With warped little, over hundred
      years!!(?)

      'i' is next to 'z', on your Caligraph #2 of typebars? by the way.. , what I
      once asked here..
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TYPEWRITERS/message/47865

      If they keep precision, what a good old wood material was used for..

      ~rj

      --- In TYPEWRITERS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:TYPEWRITERS%40yahoogroups.com> ,
      Ned Brooks <nedbrooks@...> wrote:
      >
      > I never saw one, alas - perhaps some had one and some the other. I know
      > from direct observation that the Caligraph #2 has wooden keylevers.
      >
      > On 5/6/2011 3:46 PM, raycy.japan wrote:
      > > Keylevers of S&G: metal? or wooden?
      > > Current(1949)[1] seems to say it metal.
      > > Huling(1886) [2] seems to say it wooden.
      > >
      > > ref.
      > > [1]Current, "The original typewriter enterprise: 1867-1873"(1949),p.398
      > > http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/wmh/archives/search.aspx?area=browse
      <http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/wmh/archives/search.aspx?area=browse&volume
      =32&articleID=17858> &volume=32&articleID=17858
      > > [2]Huling "SOME TYPE WRITERS THEIR ORIGIN AND USES"(1886)
      > > http://books.google.com/books?id=em0eAQAAMAAJ
      <http://books.google.com/books?id=em0eAQAAMAAJ&dq=Densmore%20%22Type%20write
      r%20Company%22&hl=ja&pg=PA335#v=onepage&q=Densmore%20%22Type%20writer%20Comp
      any%22&f=false>
      &dq=Densmore%20%22Type%20writer%20Company%22&hl=ja&pg=PA335#v=onepage&q=Dens
      more%20%22Type%20writer%20Company%22&f=false
      > >
      > > http://qwerty-history.g.hatena.ne.jp/raycy/20110507/1304707011
      > >
      > > Breathing at loooong 123miles distance far off from Fukushima Daiichi.
      > > And so I know, still I am..
      > >
      > > ~rj
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ------------------------------------
      > >
      > > Group Owner: Jay Respler. Moderator: David Born. Honorary Moderator:
      Paul Robert
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • raycy.japan
      ... What wonderful key-levers of the writing machine running underneath of , hiding fine-gain behind the paint of black.. looks as if japan..Wow If they were
      Message 2 of 11 , May 10, 2011
        >
        > The wooden key-levers that ran front-to-rear underneath were of a fine-grain wood that had been painted black but most of the paint had flaked off.
        > The problem with using wood this way is that it would fail much sooner than metal at the pivot points. But there was no sign of rot or warping.
        >

        What wonderful key-levers of the writing machine running underneath of , hiding fine-gain behind the paint of black.. looks as if japan..Wow

        If they were lacquered japan, never had flaked off as long as Fukushima nuke goes sound and healthy..


        ~rj


        --- In TYPEWRITERS@yahoogroups.com, Ned Brooks <nedbrooks@...> wrote:
        >
        > On 5/7/2011 2:45 AM, raycy.japan wrote:
        > >> I never saw one, alas - perhaps some had one and some the other.
        > >> I know
        > >> from direct observation that the Caligraph #2 has wooden keylevers.
        > > Wooden ., may one reason of light weight.. With warped little, over hundred years!!(?)
        > >
        > > 'i' is next to 'z', on your Caligraph #2 of typebars? by the way.. , what I once asked here..
        > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TYPEWRITERS/message/47865
        > >
        > > If they keep precision, what a good old wood material was used for..
        >
        > I gave my Caligraph away long ago, so I don't know how the keyboard was
        > arranged. The wooden key-levers that ran front-to-rear underneath were
        > of a fine-grain wood that had been painted black but most of the paint
        > had flaked off. The problem with using wood this way is that it would
        > fail much sooner than metal at the pivot points. But there was no sign
        > of rot or warping.
        >
      • Ned Brooks
        ... No, the black certainly wasn t lacquer - a very thin layer and no primer. The wood however must have been very well seasoned to have remained so smooth and
        Message 3 of 11 , May 10, 2011
          On 5/10/2011 8:35 AM, raycy.japan wrote:
          >> The wooden key-levers that ran front-to-rear underneath were of a fine-grain wood that had been painted black but most of the paint had flaked off.
          >> The problem with using wood this way is that it would fail much sooner than metal at the pivot points. But there was no sign of rot or warping.
          >>
          > What wonderful key-levers of the writing machine running underneath of , hiding fine-gain behind the paint of black.. looks as if japan..Wow

          No, the black certainly wasn't lacquer - a very thin layer and no
          primer. The wood however must have been very well seasoned to have
          remained so smooth and straight for so long. I got the impression -
          though I did not take one out - that the wood had become very light and
          dry. Alas, I do not recall who I traded it to or for what. It would be
          interesting to know if it was restored (there was a lot of surface rust)
          or just used for parts.
        • raycy.japan
          The key-levers of Remington No.2 looks wooden. http://f.hatena.ne.jp/raycy/20120708111751 http://qwerty-history.g.hatena.ne.jp/raycy/20120708/1341714021 ~rj
          Message 4 of 11 , Jul 12, 2012
            The key-levers of Remington No.2 looks wooden.

            http://f.hatena.ne.jp/raycy/20120708111751
            http://qwerty-history.g.hatena.ne.jp/raycy/20120708/1341714021

            ~rj


            --- In TYPEWRITERS@yahoogroups.com, "raycy.japan" <raycy.japan@...> wrote:
            >
            > Keylevers of S&G: metal? or wooden?
            > Current(1949)[1] seems to say it metal.
            > Huling(1886) [2] seems to say it wooden.
            >
            > ref.
            > [1]Current, "The original typewriter enterprise: 1867-1873"(1949),p.398
            > http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/wmh/archives/search.aspx?area=browse&volume=32&articleID=17858
            > [2]Huling "SOME TYPE WRITERS THEIR ORIGIN AND USES"(1886)
            > http://books.google.com/books?id=em0eAQAAMAAJ&dq=Densmore%20%22Type%20writer%20Company%22&hl=ja&pg=PA335#v=onepage&q=Densmore%20%22Type%20writer%20Company%22&f=false
            >
            > http://qwerty-history.g.hatena.ne.jp/raycy/20110507/1304707011
            >
            > Breathing at loooong 123miles distance far off from Fukushima Daiichi.
            > And so I know, still I am..
            >
            > ~rj
            >
          • Ned Brooks
            And they may be - but I wouldn t believe it just from seeing that artist s impression. The only wooden levers I have seen were on the Caligraph 2.
            Message 5 of 11 , Jul 12, 2012
              And they may be - but I wouldn't believe it just from seeing that
              artist's impression. The only wooden levers I have seen were on the
              Caligraph 2.

              On 7/12/2012 4:45 PM, raycy.japan wrote:
              >
              > The key-levers of Remington No.2 looks wooden.
              >
              > http://f.hatena.ne.jp/raycy/20120708111751
              > http://qwerty-history.g.hatena.ne.jp/raycy/20120708/1341714021
              >
              > ~rj
              >
              >
              > --- In TYPEWRITERS@yahoogroups.com, "raycy.japan" <raycy.japan@...> wrote:
              >> Keylevers of S&G: metal? or wooden?
              >> Current(1949)[1] seems to say it metal.
              >> Huling(1886) [2] seems to say it wooden.
              >>
              >> ref.
              >> [1]Current, "The original typewriter enterprise: 1867-1873"(1949),p.398
              >> http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/wmh/archives/search.aspx?area=browse&volume=32&articleID=17858
              >> [2]Huling "SOME TYPE WRITERS THEIR ORIGIN AND USES"(1886)
              >> http://books.google.com/books?id=em0eAQAAMAAJ&dq=Densmore%20%22Type%20writer%20Company%22&hl=ja&pg=PA335#v=onepage&q=Densmore%20%22Type%20writer%20Company%22&f=false
              >>
              >> http://qwerty-history.g.hatena.ne.jp/raycy/20110507/1304707011
              >>
              >> Breathing at loooong 123miles distance far off from Fukushima Daiichi.
              >> And so I know, still I am..
              >>
              >> ~rj
              >>
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > Group Owner: Jay Respler. Moderator: David Born. Honorary Moderator: Paul Robert
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • raycy.japan
              Hello, Ned. What a strict evidencist you are! Wonderful and ordinary scientific way.. I understand. ~rj
              Message 6 of 11 , Jul 12, 2012
                Hello, Ned.
                What a strict evidencist you are! Wonderful and ordinary scientific way.. I understand.

                ~rj


                --- In TYPEWRITERS@yahoogroups.com, Ned Brooks <nedbrooks@...> wrote:
                >
                > And they may be - but I wouldn't believe it just from seeing that
                > artist's impression. The only wooden levers I have seen were on the
                > Caligraph 2.
                >
                > On 7/12/2012 4:45 PM, raycy.japan wrote:
                > >
                > > The key-levers of Remington No.2 looks wooden.
                > >
                > > http://f.hatena.ne.jp/raycy/20120708111751
                > > http://qwerty-history.g.hatena.ne.jp/raycy/20120708/1341714021
                > >
                > > ~rj
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In TYPEWRITERS@yahoogroups.com, "raycy.japan" <raycy.japan@> wrote:
                > >> Keylevers of S&G: metal? or wooden?
                > >> Current(1949)[1] seems to say it metal.
                > >> Huling(1886) [2] seems to say it wooden.
                > >>
                > >> ref.
                > >> [1]Current, "The original typewriter enterprise: 1867-1873"(1949),p.398
                > >> http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/wmh/archives/search.aspx?area=browse&volume=32&articleID=17858
                > >> [2]Huling "SOME TYPE WRITERS THEIR ORIGIN AND USES"(1886)
                > >> http://books.google.com/books?id=em0eAQAAMAAJ&dq=Densmore%20%22Type%20writer%20Company%22&hl=ja&pg=PA335#v=onepage&q=Densmore%20%22Type%20writer%20Company%22&f=false
                > >>
                > >> http://qwerty-history.g.hatena.ne.jp/raycy/20110507/1304707011
                > >>
                > >> Breathing at loooong 123miles distance far off from Fukushima Daiichi.
                > >> And so I know, still I am..
                > >>
                > >> ~rj
                > >>
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > ------------------------------------
                > >
                > > Group Owner: Jay Respler. Moderator: David Born. Honorary Moderator: Paul Robert
                > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
              • Ned Brooks
                Well, my working career was as an engineer. Note that while the Caligraph pieces act only in tension in the direction of the grain of the wood, this key-lever
                Message 7 of 11 , Jul 13, 2012
                  Well, my working career was as an engineer. Note that while the
                  Caligraph pieces act only in tension in the direction of the grain of
                  the wood, this key-lever is loaded eccentrically so that in due course -
                  if it were wood - the wood might split along the grain line. Also, the
                  shading on the lever, that looks like wood, is also used on the support
                  below - are we to imagine that that is also wood?

                  On 7/12/2012 6:14 PM, raycy.japan wrote:
                  >
                  > Hello, Ned.
                  > What a strict evidencist you are! Wonderful and ordinary scientific way.. I understand.
                  >
                  > ~rj
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In TYPEWRITERS@yahoogroups.com, Ned Brooks <nedbrooks@...> wrote:
                  >> And they may be - but I wouldn't believe it just from seeing that
                  >> artist's impression. The only wooden levers I have seen were on the
                  >> Caligraph 2.
                  >>
                  >> On 7/12/2012 4:45 PM, raycy.japan wrote:
                  >>> The key-levers of Remington No.2 looks wooden.
                  >>>
                  >>> http://f.hatena.ne.jp/raycy/20120708111751
                  >>> http://qwerty-history.g.hatena.ne.jp/raycy/20120708/1341714021
                  >>>
                  >>> ~rj
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >>> --- In TYPEWRITERS@yahoogroups.com, "raycy.japan" <raycy.japan@> wrote:
                  >>>> Keylevers of S&G: metal? or wooden?
                  >>>> Current(1949)[1] seems to say it metal.
                  >>>> Huling(1886) [2] seems to say it wooden.
                  >>>>
                  >>>> ref.
                  >>>> [1]Current, "The original typewriter enterprise: 1867-1873"(1949),p.398
                  >>>> http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/wmh/archives/search.aspx?area=browse&volume=32&articleID=17858
                  >>>> [2]Huling "SOME TYPE WRITERS THEIR ORIGIN AND USES"(1886)
                  >>>> http://books.google.com/books?id=em0eAQAAMAAJ&dq=Densmore%20%22Type%20writer%20Company%22&hl=ja&pg=PA335#v=onepage&q=Densmore%20%22Type%20writer%20Company%22&f=false
                  >>>>
                  >>>> http://qwerty-history.g.hatena.ne.jp/raycy/20110507/1304707011
                  >>>>
                  >>>> Breathing at loooong 123miles distance far off from Fukushima Daiichi.
                  >>>> And so I know, still I am..
                  >>>>
                  >>>> ~rj
                  >>>>
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >>> ------------------------------------
                  >>>
                  >>> Group Owner: Jay Respler. Moderator: David Born. Honorary Moderator: Paul Robert
                  >>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------
                  >
                  > Group Owner: Jay Respler. Moderator: David Born. Honorary Moderator: Paul Robert
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
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