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Re: Wyckoff says "dis-order is caused by colored or Irish.".. Do you believe?

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  • raycy.japan
    I ve found an article of USE AND ABUSE..(something) [1] saying similar thing as Wyckoff[2] says that the machine is not bad in many cases, but not says
    Message 1 of 12 , May 6, 2011
      I've found an article of "USE AND ABUSE..(something)"[1] saying similar thing as Wyckoff[2] says that the machine is not bad in many cases, but not says colornized nor Irishush nor Jappipee nor so non..

      ref.
      [1]"WRITING-MACHINES --- THEIR USE AND ABUSE, GENERAL REMARKS", Munson's phonographic news and teacher. v. IV No.1. (1884)


      --- In TYPEWRITERS@yahoogroups.com, Michael Nagle <michaelnagle@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > That's a typical attitude for that period in American history. It was common to assume that those two groups were only smart enough for manual labor. These days we just shake out heads in disbelief at the ignorance of people back then.
      >
      > Of course, my Irish-American family looks at the whole thing as a joke now, as Irishmen tend to do about any adversity. (Why did the English invent the wheelbarrow? To teach the Irish to walk on two legs!).
      >
      >
      > ---
      >
      >
      > To: TYPEWRITERS@yahoogroups.com
      > From: raycy.japan@...
      > Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2011 09:59:11 +0000
      > Subject: [TYPEWRITERS] Wyckoff says "dis-order is caused by colored or Irish.".. Do you believe?
      >
      >
      > "Our experience so far has been that actual dis-alignment is most frequently caused by the meddling of parties who know nothing about the machine, seeking to gratify curiosity in the absence of owners and operators. Colored men and Irishmen having charge of offices where the machine is kept, were never known to resist the temptation to try writing their names upon the machine.
      >
      > Wyckoff. NOV. and DEC, 1883"
      >
      >
      >
      > http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/ptsearch?id=nyp.33433017210562&q1=Irishmen
      >
      > http://qwerty-history.g.hatena.ne.jp/raycy/20110429/1304069662
      >
      > http://kygaku.g.hatena.ne.jp/raycy/20110429/1304030564
      >
      >
      > I live 123 Miles off from the Fukushima Daiichi.
      >
      >
      >
      > 123 Miles / 198 Km
      >
      > http://www.distancebetweencities.net/santa-cruz_ca_and_merced_ca/
      >
      >
      >
      > ~rj
      >
    • raycy.japan
      [1] WRITING-MACHINES --- THEIR USE AND ABUSE, GENERAL REMARKS , Munson s phonographic news and teacher. v. IV No.1. (1884) ... Jappipee ~rj
      Message 2 of 12 , May 6, 2011
        [1]"WRITING-MACHINES --- THEIR USE AND ABUSE, GENERAL REMARKS", Munson's phonographic news and teacher. v. IV No.1. (1884)
        link to:
        > http://books.google.com/books?hl=ja&id=NvUCAAAAYAAJ&q=abuse+nine+out+of+ten#v=snippet&q=%E2%80%9Duse%20and%20abuse%E2%80%9D%20OR%20%22little%20mechanical%20skill%22&f=false

        Jappipee

        ~rj


        >--- In TYPEWRITERS@yahoogroups.com, "raycy.japan" <raycy.japan@...> >wrote:
        >
        > I've found an article of "USE AND ABUSE..(something)"[1] saying similar thing as Wyckoff[2] says that the machine is not bad in many cases, but not says colornized nor Irishush nor Jappipee nor so non..
        >
        > ref.
        > [1]"WRITING-MACHINES --- THEIR USE AND ABUSE, GENERAL REMARKS", Munson's phonographic news and teacher. v. IV No.1. (1884)
        >
        >
        > --- In TYPEWRITERS@yahoogroups.com, Michael Nagle <michaelnagle@> wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > > That's a typical attitude for that period in American history. It was common to assume that those two groups were only smart enough for manual labor. These days we just shake out heads in disbelief at the ignorance of people back then.
        > >
        > > Of course, my Irish-American family looks at the whole thing as a joke now, as Irishmen tend to do about any adversity. (Why did the English invent the wheelbarrow? To teach the Irish to walk on two legs!).
        > >
        > >
        > > ---
        > >
        > >
        > > To: TYPEWRITERS@yahoogroups.com
        > > From: raycy.japan@
        > > Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2011 09:59:11 +0000
        > > Subject: [TYPEWRITERS] Wyckoff says "dis-order is caused by colored or Irish.".. Do you believe?
        > >
        > >
        > > "Our experience so far has been that actual dis-alignment is most frequently caused by the meddling of parties who know nothing about the machine, seeking to gratify curiosity in the absence of owners and operators. Colored men and Irishmen having charge of offices where the machine is kept, were never known to resist the temptation to try writing their names upon the machine.
        > >
        > > Wyckoff. NOV. and DEC, 1883"
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/ptsearch?id=nyp.33433017210562&q1=Irishmen
        > >
        > > http://qwerty-history.g.hatena.ne.jp/raycy/20110429/1304069662
        > >
        > > http://kygaku.g.hatena.ne.jp/raycy/20110429/1304030564
        > >
        > >
        > > I live 123 Miles off from the Fukushima Daiichi.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > 123 Miles / 198 Km
        > >
        > > http://www.distancebetweencities.net/santa-cruz_ca_and_merced_ca/
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ~rj
        > >
        >
      • Ned Brooks
        ... Fascinating look at the world of the 1880s! I had no idea there was hektograph ribbon that would supposedly allow 40-60 copies. Or that people had to be
        Message 3 of 12 , May 7, 2011
          On 5/7/2011 1:30 AM, raycy.japan wrote:
          >
          > [1]"WRITING-MACHINES --- THEIR USE AND ABUSE, GENERAL REMARKS", Munson's phonographic news and teacher. v. IV No.1. (1884)
          > link to:
          >> http://books.google.com/books?hl=ja&id=NvUCAAAAYAAJ&q=abuse+nine+out+of+ten#v=snippet&q=%E2%80%9Duse%20and%20abuse%E2%80%9D%20OR%20%22little%20mechanical%20skill%22&f=false

          Fascinating look at the world of the 1880s! I had no idea there was
          hektograph ribbon that would supposedly allow 40-60 copies. Or that
          people had to be warned against lubricating their typewriter with lard!
        • Jay Williams
          I m not surprised by such a warning. When I was 8, a neighbor gave me an old clock to mess around with. It worked pretty well, but I was put off, to put it
          Message 4 of 12 , May 7, 2011
            I'm not surprised by such a warning. When I was 8, a neighbor gave me an old clock to mess around with. It worked pretty well, but I was put off, to put it mildly, to find that the whole of the innards was literally drenched with what smelled like bacon fat. Not particularly fresh, either.
            Jay
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Ned Brooks
            To: TYPEWRITERS@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Saturday, May 07, 2011 2:13 PM
            Subject: Re: [TYPEWRITERS] Re: Wyckoff says "dis-order is caused by colored or Irish.".. Do you believe?



            On 5/7/2011 1:30 AM, raycy.japan wrote:
            >
            > [1]"WRITING-MACHINES --- THEIR USE AND ABUSE, GENERAL REMARKS", Munson's phonographic news and teacher. v. IV No.1. (1884)
            > link to:
            >> http://books.google.com/books?hl=ja&id=NvUCAAAAYAAJ&q=abuse+nine+out+of+ten#v=snippet&q=%E2%80%9Duse%20and%20abuse%E2%80%9D%20OR%20%22little%20mechanical%20skill%22&f=false

            Fascinating look at the world of the 1880s! I had no idea there was
            hektograph ribbon that would supposedly allow 40-60 copies. Or that
            people had to be warned against lubricating their typewriter with lard!





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          • Ned Brooks
            If it was fresh when put on, it would be rancid soon after, at room temperature and with such a large exposed surface area! But as the Mad Hatter said of the
            Message 5 of 12 , May 7, 2011
              If it was fresh when put on, it would be rancid soon after, at room
              temperature and with such a large exposed surface area! But as the Mad
              Hatter said of the butter he put in his watch, it may have been the
              "very best" lard!

              On 5/7/2011 3:31 PM, Jay Williams wrote:
              > I'm not surprised by such a warning. When I was 8, a neighbor gave me an old clock to mess around with. It worked pretty well, but I was put off, to put it mildly, to find that the whole of the innards was literally drenched with what smelled like bacon fat. Not particularly fresh, either.
              > Jay
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: Ned Brooks
              > To: TYPEWRITERS@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Saturday, May 07, 2011 2:13 PM
              > Subject: Re: [TYPEWRITERS] Re: Wyckoff says "dis-order is caused by colored or Irish.".. Do you believe?
              >
              >
              >
              > On 5/7/2011 1:30 AM, raycy.japan wrote:
              > >
              > > [1]"WRITING-MACHINES --- THEIR USE AND ABUSE, GENERAL REMARKS", Munson's phonographic news and teacher. v. IV No.1. (1884)
              > > link to:
              > >> http://books.google.com/books?hl=ja&id=NvUCAAAAYAAJ&q=abuse+nine+out+of+ten#v=snippet&q=%E2%80%9Duse%20and%20abuse%E2%80%9D%20OR%20%22little%20mechanical%20skill%22&f=false
              >
              > Fascinating look at the world of the 1880s! I had no idea there was
              > hektograph ribbon that would supposedly allow 40-60 copies. Or that
              > people had to be warned against lubricating their typewriter with lard!
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              >
              >
              >
              > No virus found in this incoming message.
              > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
              > Version: 9.0.900 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/3622 - Release Date: 05/07/11 02:34:00
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > Group Owner: Jay Respler. Moderator: David Born. Honorary Moderator: Paul Robert
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            • John Clark
              ... Until the invention and widespread use of dead dinosaur bones for oils and greases, most lubricants were made from vegetable or animal fats. Further in
              Message 6 of 12 , May 7, 2011
                On May 7, 2011, at 12:49 PM, Ned Brooks wrote:

                > If it was fresh when put on, it would be rancid soon after, at room
                > temperature and with such a large exposed surface area! But as the Mad
                > Hatter said of the butter he put in his watch, it may have been the
                > "very best" lard!
                >
                >

                Until the invention and widespread use of dead dinosaur bones for oils and greases, most 'lubricants' were made from vegetable or
                animal fats. Further in Mediterranean regions 'butter' was more of an oily liquid than a solid, and didn't compete
                much with olive oil, except as a medical preparation or a novelty 'food'...

                Don't know if the Mad Hatter reference is a two or three pronged reference... Mr. Dodgson had a penchant for
                weaving crypto classicisms into his works... but in any case the greeks were somewhat bemused that the thracians
                actually 'ate' butter, calling them the Buttereaters... otherwise the Greeks may have viewed butter as 'oil' and either used
                as a topical, or lubricant of some sort.

                Hippocrates appears to have been one of the first to describe 'butter', and mentions that the Thracians would use mare's milk and 'churn'
                that to yield the substance which is identified to be 'butter' (greek: bouteron...).



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Richard
                ... Can we have further and better particulars of this novel technology please? Richard
                Message 7 of 12 , May 8, 2011
                  --- In TYPEWRITERS@yahoogroups.com, John Clark <jeclark2006@...> wrote:

                  > Until the invention and widespread use of dead dinosaur bones for oils and greases, most 'lubricants' were made from vegetable or
                  > animal fats.

                  Can we have further and better particulars of this novel technology please?

                  Richard
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