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Re: Hoo Ya USN SeALs!!

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  • paulkagel
    Fair enough, I stand corrected. BZ to my Airforce bretheren for an excellent job at blowing up the enemy. PK
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 3 9:30 AM
      Fair enough, I stand corrected. BZ to my Airforce bretheren for an excellent job at blowing up the enemy.

      PK

      --- In TXBasicAcademy@yahoogroups.com, TW Gray <ssgtwg@...> wrote:
      >
      > On the premise of not stealing the Thunder from those who are responsible
      > for this mission, it was NOT the Navy Seals but the US Air Force Special
      > Operations Wing of the Joint Special Operation Command who are the proper
      > ones to point to for your praise. When the article states the same unit they
      > mean JSOC not Seal Team 6. As a retired SF Soldier I will always give the
      > credit to those who rightly deserve it. Well done Airmen!
      >
      > On Sat, Oct 1, 2011 at 12:49 AM, paulkagel <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
      >
      > > **
      > >
      > >
      > > WASHINGTON - The same U.S. military unit that got Osama bin Laden used a
      > > drone and jet strike in Yemen on Friday to kill an American-born cleric
      > > suspected of inspiring or helping plan numerous attacks on the United
      > > States, including the Christmas 2009 attempt to blow up a jetliner, U.S.
      > > officials said.
      > >
      > > Anwar al-Awlaki was killed in a strike on his convoy carried out by a joint
      > > operation of the CIA and the U.S. Joint Special Operations Command,
      > > according to counterterrorism officials, speaking on condition of anonymity
      > > to discuss intelligence. The CIA provided the intelligence and the military
      > > provided the firepower.
      > >
      > > Al-Awlaki had been under observation for three weeks while they waited for
      > > the right opportunity to strike, one of the U.S. officials said.
      > >
      > > The cleric known for fiery anti-American rhetoric spread on the Internet
      > > was suspected of inspiring the mass shooting at Fort Hood Army base in Texas
      > > in 2009 and of taking a more direct role in planning the attempted Christmas
      > > bombing of a Detroit-bound jetliner and other terror attempts against
      > > Americans.
      > >
      > > He is the most prominent al-Qaida figure to be killed since bin Laden's
      > > death in May.
      > >
      > > U.S. word of al-Awlaki's death came after the government of Yemen reported
      > > that he had been killed Friday about five miles from the town of Khashef,
      > > some 87 miles from the capital Sanaa.
      > >
      > > The air strike was carried out more openly than the covert operation that
      > > sent Navy SEALs into bin Laden's Pakistani compound, U.S. officials said.
      > > Counterterrorism cooperation between the United States and Yemen has
      > > improved in recent weeks, allowing better intelligence-gathering on
      > > al-Awlaki's movements, U.S. officials said. The ability to better track him
      > > was a key factor in the success of the strike, U.S. officials said.
      > > Officials spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss intelligence matters.
      > >
      > > Al-Awlaki's death is the latest in a run of high-profile kills for
      > > Washington under President Barack Obama. But the killing raises questions
      > > that the death of other al-Qaida leaders, including bin Laden, did not.
      > >
      > > Al-Awlaki is a U.S. citizen, born in New Mexico to Yemeni parents, who had
      > > not been charged with any crime. Civil liberties groups have questioned the
      > > government's authority to kill an American without trial.
      > >
      > > U.S. officials have said they believe al-Awlaki inspired the actions of
      > > Army psychiatrist Maj. Nidal Hasan, who is charged with 13 counts of
      > > premeditated murder and 32 counts of attempted premeditated murder in the
      > > attack at Fort Hood, Texas.
      > >
      > > In New York, the Pakistani-American man who pleaded guilty to the May 2010
      > > Times Square car bombing attempt said he was "inspired" by al-Awlaki after
      > > making contact over the Internet.
      > >
      > > Al-Awlaki also is believed to have had a hand in mail bombs addressed to
      > > Chicago-area synagogues, packages intercepted in Dubai and Europe in October
      > > 2010.
      > >
      > > Al-Awlaki's death "will especially impact the group's ability to recruit,
      > > inspire and raise funds as al-Awlaki's influence and ability to connect to a
      > > broad demographic of potential supporters was unprecedented," said terrorist
      > > analyst Ben Venzke of the private intelligence monitoring firm, the
      > > IntelCenter.
      > >
      > > But Venzke said the terror group al-Qaida in the Arab Peninsula will remain
      > > the most dangerous regional arm "both in its region and for the direct
      > > threat it poses to the U.S. following three recent failed attacks," with its
      > > leader Nasir al-Wahayshi still at large.
      > >
      > > Al-Awlaki wrote an article in the latest issue of the terror group's
      > > magazine justifying attacking civilians in the West. It's titled "Targeting
      > > the Populations of Countries that Are at War with the Muslims."
      > >
      > > Al-Awlaki served as imam at the Dar al-Hijrah mosque in Falls Church, Va.,
      > > a Washington suburb, for about a year in 2001.
      > >
      > > The mosque's outreach director, Imam Johari Abdul-Malik, has said that
      > > mosque members never saw al-Awlaki espousing radical ideology while he was
      > > there and that he believes Awlaki's views changed after he left the U.S.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
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