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Re: [TTLUG] need recommendation for a good book

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  • Vlade Malfet
    ............but if you must have a book i recomend you start with SAM s teach yourself linux in 24 hours... search barns and nobel or amazon.com for it..btu
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 6, 2002
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      ............but if you must have a book i recomend you start with SAM's
      teach yourself linux in 24 hours...
      search barns and nobel or amazon.com for it..btu kerry is right....best way
      is playing with it...there is documentation that you canisntall withthe
      system...at least for mandrake..ic ant say aboutthe other distros......
      www.linux.org has basically everyhting you need tho...
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Kerry Panchoo" <kpanchoo@...>
      To: <TTLUG@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Sunday, October 06, 2002 1:18 PM
      Subject: Re: [TTLUG] need recommendation for a good book


      > if you really want to get into Linux, forget about investing money in
      > books and investing time into playing around with it. My suggestion is
      > getting the HOW-TOs, FAQs and other techincal online documentation and
      > playing around with it till it works. I invested a lot of money in books
      > on linux only to find myself using the online docs.
      >
      > Kerry
      >
      > Kirk Lashley wrote:
      >
      > >Hey folks,
      > >
      > >Although I am extremely pissed by the bloated trend of Linux
      > >installations I still love them... My only problem now with Redhat esp.
      > >when installing is that although it should be an unattended install I've
      > >got to check in every 1/2 hour or so to change the CDs. Funny thing
      > >about that is that it started at around 7.3... when the install said
      > >it'd take 14 minutes and ended taking an hour and 14 minutes.
      > >
      > >So in my effort to eventually fully migrate to a Linux environment, I
      > >figure I should invest in some books. Now Linux books are a couple
      > >dimes a dozen, but which one (yeah I'd like to start with 1) is
      > >currently worth its salt. I saw this title and it looks good, "Red Hat
      > >Linux Networking and System Administration"... however if there's a good
      > >complete reference which could be of use to me, please tell me. I'm not
      > >any linux expert, just a hobbyist - but I figure its about high time I
      > >really get into it. I'm gonna have some time come late October to spend
      > >mulling over this OS, so I want to be prepared to use it wisely.
      > >
      > >So in summary... book recommendations anyone?
      > >
      > >Kirk
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
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      > >
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      > >
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    • Kirk Lashley
      I should mention that although I m not an expert, I m no newcomer either. I ve successfully managed and maintained an RHL 7.1 server for about a year now,
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 6, 2002
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        I should mention that although I'm not an expert, I'm no newcomer
        either. I've successfully managed and maintained an RHL 7.1 server for
        about a year now, with very few hitches. I know the online docs are
        invaluable (nothing beats a man page). However sometimes a good
        book/reference could always help out in a jam. I looked at "Linux
        Problem Solver" which had excellent advice for doing configurations on a
        machine (eg. setting up a gateway). I'm not the kind to sit down with a
        book and read it to follow a tutorial, but I like printed reference
        material in front of me (not stuff that's found in man pages). There
        are many things that I use in Linux that I know I have to use and have
        running in order to get other things to run, but can't figure out why...
        I'd like to figure out why.

        Sorry I shouldn't have said book... I mean "reference" :-) Thanks for
        the suggestions so far .And as far as playing with it goes... its very
        easy to get setup and running, but when you want more than comes in the
        box it requires a bit more work, eg. compiling drivers, upgrading a
        kernel (althogh RHL has made it easier), figuring out how to use a tape
        drive that the system didn't autodetect... understanding ida# as
        compared with sda# and hda# for hard drive partitions... And besides
        that... I like books!

        Kirk
      • Dev Teelucksingh
        ... The Securing and Optimizing Linux series by Gerhard Mourani of Openna.com are very good. The first edition Securing and Optimizing Linux Red Hat
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 6, 2002
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          On Sun, 06 Oct 2002 03:49:48 -0400, Kirk Lashley wrote:

          > So in my effort to eventually fully migrate to a Linux environment, I
          > figure I should invest in some books. Now Linux books are a couple
          > dimes a dozen, but which one (yeah I'd like to start with 1) is
          > currently worth its salt.

          > So in summary... book recommendations anyone?

          > Kirk

          The "Securing and Optimizing Linux" series by Gerhard Mourani
          of Openna.com are very good.

          The first edition
          "Securing and Optimizing Linux Red Hat Edition - A Hands on Guide"
          by Gerhard Mourani is available for download at

          The Linux Documentation Project: Guides at
          http://www.tldp.org/guides.html

          It covers Redhat 6.1/6.2.

          The 2nd edition (which is for sale at Openna.com) covers Redhat 7.x
          and a 3rd edition is now available


          Dev Anand Teelucksingh
          Interesting DOS programs at http://www.opus.co.tt/dave
          Trinidad and Tobago Computer Society websites at
          http://www.ttcsweb.org and http://www.ttcs.net
          -- This mail was written using Arachne - http://arachne.cz/ --
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