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CUPS

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  • Wendell Clarke
    Hi guys i use cups for printing and it works very well but i have a problem with some of my applications they don t recognise my printer at all .. I usually
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 18, 2002
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      Hi guys i use cups for printing and it works very well but i have a
      problem with some of my applications they don't recognise my printer at
      all .. I usually get a setting for ( lpr ) ...
      I think i might have to edit the /etc/printcap file but i don't know
      what setting to put into it for cups ...
      But if i am right about the printcap stuff could anyone send me a copy
      of there printcap file that is configured with cups..
      Otherwise if i am wrong could someone give me a tip on what to do..


      Laterz...
    • Allan Samaroo
      Hey fellas I wanna implement a Linux router.......i ve tred to d/l Coyote, Freesco and LRP but I don t know if I m doing it right.....can someone post
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 18, 2002
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        Hey fellas

        I wanna implement a Linux router.......i've tred to d/l Coyote, Freesco
        and LRP but I don't know if I'm doing it right.....can someone post
        links/instructions.......i'm just familiar with ISOs and stuff so in the
        case of LRP I'm not sure what I'm supposed to d/l.......

        I'll also appreciate any links to tutorials/articles/how-to's for a
        quick setup.

        Thanks guys.

        Allan.
      • Richard Hamel-Smith
        This morning (and last night) I was trying to get my daughters PCs to print to the printer connected to my PC. My PC (called mutt) runs CUPS. It prints fine.
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 21, 2004
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          This morning (and last night) I was trying to get my daughters' PCs to
          print to the printer connected to my PC.

          My PC (called mutt) runs CUPS. It prints fine. So I thought it would be
          easy to get their PCs to print as well.

          In the office, all the Linux computers run some version of RedHat. They
          all run CUPS and it seems to work well.

          Now it has been some time since I interfered with CUPS, so I've
          forgotten how to do it. But how hard can it be?

          My daughters' PCs run Slackware 9.

          Mutt runs RedHat 6.1.

          So I try to find CUPS on Slackware. First oops. It's not there, but
          there are enough references to CUPS all over the place that it confuses
          me into thinking it is. So first dead end, is trying to find CUPS.
          Eventually, I give up and go to www.cups.org and download it.
          Cups-1.1.20-source.tgz or something. 4MB

          While I'm waiting for it to download, I muck around with something
          called apsfilter, which is Patrick's (the guy who produces Slackware)
          recommended way of printing. Needless to say, I get nowhere. I try using
          apsfilter with Samba, which I also have running on Mutt, but even though
          I can see the request from the client PC, nothing prints.

          Eventually, CUPS finishes downloading. I untar, ./configure, make and
          make install. Nothing alarming happens. When I start up my browser at
          http://localhost:631/. Duh, oops again. I have to go back and figure out
          how to start up CUPS.

          RedHat and Slackware start up services very differently. RedHat uses a
          series of scripts in a bunch of confusing directories which, when it is
          all explained to you, sound very logical and all that (but you never
          really want to go there).

          Slackware uses a bunch of scripts in a single directory. There is like a
          script to run each service and if you don't want a service to run, you
          change the permissions to make it not executable. Simpler in a form. But
          if you are adding a new service, where do you get the script? Do you
          have to write it yourself?

          Eventually, I find a script in the CUPS directory that looks like the
          right thing. I copy it to the /etc/rc.d directory, name it rc.cups and
          make it executable. Then I run it and CUPS starts up.

          Good. Past step 1.

          I run the browser again at http://localhost:631/ and now the CUPS page
          I'm accustomed to, pops up. And in that wonderful way that sometimes
          happens, the printer on Mutt is already there.

          Great. Step 2

          I send a test print. Nothing comes out. Blood pressure rises.

          I sigh, telnet to mutt and open /etc/cups/cupsd.conf. At this point, ESR
          comes to mind. An hour later, when I finally get the damn thing to
          print, and am way late for work, ESR has been raised to prophet status.

          The key entry is "Allow from 192.168.0.2". This MUST be on a separate
          line. Nothing in the heavily commented cupsd.conf file points this out.
          I've been trying to add the IP address onto entries that are already
          there. Seems logical to me. If there's an IP address which is already
          working, just add another.

          But the point is ... and this is the point. The first thing CUPS should
          do when it comes up, is to interrogate the CUPS servers and output some
          kind of page indicating the current configuration and suggesting
          changes. This is not impossible.

          Twiki does that. Twiki tells you what's wrong immediately. Why can't
          CUPS? Yeah, it's great software ONCE it's working. It's getting it
          working that's the problem.


          I mean, it finds the remote printer, right? Why can't it find the
          cupsd.conf file and tell you what's wrong with it? Why can't it output
          debugging info to the web page? Why can't it suggest what to do next?

          Samba has SWAT. Why doesn't CUPS have something like that? Frustration.

          Breathing deeply,
          Richard
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