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speed up hard drive

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  • D. Fanan
    Attn. Neil Christmas. Alain mentioned to me that you found your hard drive did not seem as fast under linux as w.... the other unmentionable OS. What often
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 2, 2001
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      Attn. Neil Christmas.
       
      Alain mentioned to me that you found your hard drive did not seem as fast under linux as w.... the other unmentionable OS. What often helps is the command 'hdparm'. More info as always can be gotten from the man pages, but I'll give the briefs.
       
      What I discovered is that the usual redhat/mandrake installs usually defaults to a 16bit instead of a 32bit hard drive mode. The hard drives by nature are 16bit and are optimised to the motherboard as 32bit. Depending on the capabilities of your machine and drive configurations 32 bit access and udma optimisation is possible.
       
      Here is what.
      1) must be in root.
       
      2)run command
      # hdparm -c /dev/hda
      remember hda or as appropriate. You will get a return after a few seconds like
      /dev/hda
      I/O support e.g. (default 16-bit)
       
      3)next lets see how it is performing. Run:-
      # hdparm -t /dev/hda
      This will do a timed test and will return results e.g. /dev/hda
      timing buffered reads = 64Mb in 17.88secs =3.64Mb/sec Yours will of course vary. Do three runs with the machine doing nothing else to get a realistic average.
       
      4)To turn on 32-bit and DMA run:-
      # hdparm -c 1 -d 1 /dev/hda
      The return should look like  /dev/hda
      setting 32-bit flag to 1
      setting DMA to 1 (on)
      I/O support =1 (32-bit)
      or it will tell you what is not supported.
       
      5) To see what effect this has on your machine run the speed test again, see 3 above. On some machines the only improvement requires capitol outlay :>0. On others, there may be no marked improvement, but usually there is two to five times increase once enabled (DMA and ATA/33 to UDMA and ATA/66 spec).
       
      6) If you like what you see, commit the changes with:-
      # hdparm -k 1 /dev/hda
      will return message like /dev/hda
      setting keep_setting to 1 (on)
       
      7) but that will be lost on reboot. So... use your favorite text editor and open the following file:-
      /etc/rc.d/rc.local
      and at the bottom of the file, add the line:-
      hdparm -c 1 -d 1 -k1 /dev/hda
      save and exit. Note, if dma does not work with your drive, then do not include "-d 1" for example.
       
      8) enjoy benefits that will make w... the unmentionable OS envious.
       
      David.
    • CYMM
      David, this will go down as one of the classic letters on this list!! ... From: D. Fanan To: TTlug@egroups.com Date:
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 3, 2001
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        David, this will go down as one of the classic letters on this list!!
         
        -----Original Message-----
        From: D. Fanan <fanan@...>
        To: TTlug@egroups.com <TTlug@egroups.com>
        Date: Tuesday, January 02, 2001 10:47 PM
        Subject: [TTLUG] speed up hard drive

        Attn. Neil Christmas.
         
        Alain mentioned to me that you found your hard drive did not seem as fast under linux as w.... the other unmentionable OS. What often helps is the command 'hdparm'. More info as always can be gotten from the man pages, but I'll give the briefs.
         
        What I discovered is that the usual redhat/mandrake installs usually defaults to a 16bit instead of a 32bit hard drive mode. The hard drives by nature are 16bit and are optimised to the motherboard as 32bit. Depending on the capabilities of your machine and drive configurations 32 bit access and udma optimisation is possible.
         
        Here is what.
        1) must be in root.
         
        2)run command
        # hdparm -c /dev/hda
        remember hda or as appropriate. You will get a return after a few seconds like
        /dev/hda
        I/O support e.g. (default 16-bit)
         
        3)next lets see how it is performing. Run:-
        # hdparm -t /dev/hda
        This will do a timed test and will return results e.g. /dev/hda
        timing buffered reads = 64Mb in 17.88secs =3.64Mb/sec Yours will of course vary. Do three runs with the machine doing nothing else to get a realistic average.
         
        4)To turn on 32-bit and DMA run:-
        # hdparm -c 1 -d 1 /dev/hda
        The return should look like  /dev/hda
        setting 32-bit flag to 1
        setting DMA to 1 (on)
        I/O support =1 (32-bit)
        or it will tell you what is not supported.
         
        5) To see what effect this has on your machine run the speed test again, see 3 above. On some machines the only improvement requires capitol outlay :>0. On others, there may be no marked improvement, but usually there is two to five times increase once enabled (DMA and ATA/33 to UDMA and ATA/66 spec).
         
        6) If you like what you see, commit the changes with:-
        # hdparm -k 1 /dev/hda
        will return message like /dev/hda
        setting keep_setting to 1 (on)
         
        7) but that will be lost on reboot. So... use your favorite text editor and open the following file:-
        /etc/rc.d/rc.local
        and at the bottom of the file, add the line:-
        hdparm -c 1 -d 1 -k1 /dev/hda
        save and exit. Note, if dma does not work with your drive, then do not include "-d 1" for example.
         
        8) enjoy benefits that will make w... the unmentionable OS envious.
         
        David.


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      • Nolan Joseph
        Not only a classic but darn useful too. I tried it this morning as soon as I got it and it works. (I never had a doubt) :- Nolan ... From: CYMM
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 3, 2001
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          Not only a classic but darn useful too.  I tried it this morning as soon as I got it and it works. (I never had a doubt)  :->
           
          Nolan
          -----Original Message-----
          From: CYMM [mailto:cymm@...]
          Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2001 9:13 AM
          To: TTLUG@egroups.com
          Subject: Re: [TTLUG] speed up hard drive

          David, this will go down as one of the classic letters on this list!!
           
          -----Original Message-----
          From: D. Fanan <fanan@...>
          To: TTlug@egroups.com <TTlug@egroups.com>
          Date: Tuesday, January 02, 2001 10:47 PM
          Subject: [TTLUG] speed up hard drive

          Attn. Neil Christmas.
           
          Alain mentioned to me that you found your hard drive did not seem as fast under linux as w.... the other unmentionable OS. What often helps is the command 'hdparm'. More info as always can be gotten from the man pages, but I'll give the briefs.
           
          What I discovered is that the usual redhat/mandrake installs usually defaults to a 16bit instead of a 32bit hard drive mode. The hard drives by nature are 16bit and are optimised to the motherboard as 32bit. Depending on the capabilities of your machine and drive configurations 32 bit access and udma optimisation is possible.
           
          Here is what.
          1) must be in root.
           
          2)run command
          # hdparm -c /dev/hda
          remember hda or as appropriate. You will get a return after a few seconds like
          /dev/hda
          I/O support e.g. (default 16-bit)
           
          3)next lets see how it is performing. Run:-
          # hdparm -t /dev/hda
          This will do a timed test and will return results e.g. /dev/hda
          timing buffered reads = 64Mb in 17.88secs =3.64Mb/sec Yours will of course vary. Do three runs with the machine doing nothing else to get a realistic average.
           
          4)To turn on 32-bit and DMA run:-
          # hdparm -c 1 -d 1 /dev/hda
          The return should look like  /dev/hda
          setting 32-bit flag to 1
          setting DMA to 1 (on)
          I/O support =1 (32-bit)
          or it will tell you what is not supported.
           
          5) To see what effect this has on your machine run the speed test again, see 3 above. On some machines the only improvement requires capitol outlay :>0. On others, there may be no marked improvement, but usually there is two to five times increase once enabled (DMA and ATA/33 to UDMA and ATA/66 spec).
           
          6) If you like what you see, commit the changes with:-
          # hdparm -k 1 /dev/hda
          will return message like /dev/hda
          setting keep_setting to 1 (on)
           
          7) but that will be lost on reboot. So... use your favorite text editor and open the following file:-
          /etc/rc.d/rc.local
          and at the bottom of the file, add the line:-
          hdparm -c 1 -d 1 -k1 /dev/hda
          save and exit. Note, if dma does not work with your drive, then do not include "-d 1" for example.
           
          8) enjoy benefits that will make w... the unmentionable OS envious.
           
          David.


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          TTLUG-unsubscribe@egroups.com




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