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Fun with tests

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  • davekees
    Tests don t have to be dreaded by students. Some tests are just plain fun and great for pair work. There are hundreds of fun tests at queendom.com. They also
    Message 1 of 21 , May 15, 2005
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      Tests don't have to be dreaded by students. Some tests are just plain
      fun and great for pair work. There are hundreds of fun tests at
      queendom.com. They also have some more serious personality type tests. -
      Dave

      ``````````````````````````````````````````````````

      Here are just a few titles from:

      http://www.queendom.com/tests/minitests/index.html

      The Glutton for Punishment Test
      The Fashion Test
      The Risk Test
      The Optimist Test
      The Egomaniac Test
      The $10 Million Test
      Dysfunctional Family Test
      The Social Conscience Test
      The Snob Test
      The Vacation Test
      The Forgiveness Test
      The Living on the Edge Test
      The Fatal Attraction Test
      The Sexual Purity Test
      The Liberal Parent Test
      The Sex Fiend Test
      The Road Rage Test

      These samples above are not serious tests but they have great questions
      that can interest students and get them talking and talking. Below are
      the ten questions of the Samaritan Test:

      1. You're on your way to the most important meeting of your career. Your
      future depends upon getting there on time. You witness another car hit a
      pedestrian and then drive off. Do you miss your meeting to help?

      2. You live alone. A strange man knocks on your door and asks to come in
      and use the phone. Would you let him in?

      3. There's a small fire in your apartment building and you're already
      outside. You realize that the elderly woman who lives next door to you
      is not among the people accounted for. Do you go in and look for her?

      4. If a stray animal appeared at your door, would you:
      Call animal control and have them take away the animal.
      Ignore the animal.
      Try to find the owner.

      5. It's raining late at night and you see someone having car trouble
      flagging you down. Do you:
      Call for help from your cell phone.
      Stop and help.
      Drive on.

      6. A well-dressed stranger stops you on the street and says he needs $10
      to take a cab home. He says he'll mail it back to you. Do you give him
      the money?

      7. You just dropped all your change into a busted parking meter. Do you
      leave a note for others so they don't get screwed?

      8. Do you give spare change to the homeless?

      9. Would you jump into a lake to save a stranger?

      10. Would you give a sponge bath to the old lady who lived downstairs
      from you?
    • Russ Taylor
      Hi All, I humbly request your help. A while back somebody posted a letter example about all the anomalous pronunciation of certain English words with the same
      Message 2 of 21 , Aug 23, 2005
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        Hi All,

        I humbly request your help. A while back somebody
        posted a letter example about all the anomalous
        pronunciation of certain English words with the same
        spellings, ie though, through and enough. It was from
        a famous letter that had been published in "The
        Times". Can anyone help? I'd like to use this to guide
        Chinese teachers pronunciation in the univeristy.
        Thanks in advance.

        Russ Taylor
      • John Pullen
        Need help with a pronunciation. How is the word herb pronounced by most people. I would assume that the word is acceptable as herb and as erb, with and
        Message 3 of 21 , Aug 29, 2005
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          Need help with a pronunciation.

          How is the word "herb" pronounced by most people. I would assume that the word is acceptable as herb and as erb, with and without pronouncing the h.

          My contention is that it should be pronounced without the h and therefore it is appropriate to say, "I have an herb garden." and it is incorrect to say, "I have a herb garden."

          john
        • fshdt
          British English (and Australian) pronounces the h . for us a herb garden is correct. British kids who wrote an herb would be corrected by their teacher
          Message 4 of 21 , Aug 29, 2005
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            British English (and Australian) pronounces the 'h'. for us "a herb
            garden" is correct. British kids who wrote "an herb" would be
            corrected by their teacher and it would be suspected that their
            mistake was due to their dialect - dropping "h"s. "We ain't got an
            'erb garden in our 'ouse but me Dad's got an 'orse special for growin'
            us roses."

            Dropping 'h's is viewed as uneducated in Britain so when we hear
            educated Americans saying "an 'erb" we do a double take and it comes
            as a little shock. It's quite unfair because all of us, Americans,
            Brits and, as far as I know, all other English as a first language
            speakers drop 'h's in connected speech, especially with "have"
            auxiliaries.

            I would guess that the difference has come about through we Brits
            anglicising the French loan word and Americans retaining more of the
            original French pronuciation. I think we are both in agreement over
            "an hour" and that very few Americans or British now write "an
            history" or "an hotel" since the "h" in these words is now pronounced
            and the written form no longer needs to nod towards their French origin.

            Dick



            John Pullen <gaodachang@y...> wrote:
            > How is the word "herb" pronounced by most people?
          • fshdt
            I m told Canadians use both herb and erb. How does US English deal with herbaceous herbal and herbivore ? Do they all lose their h when spoken? Dick
            Message 5 of 21 , Aug 29, 2005
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              I'm told Canadians use both herb and 'erb.

              How does US English deal with "herbaceous" "herbal" and "herbivore"?
              Do they all lose their 'h' when spoken?

              Dick

              John Pullen wrote:
              > How is the word "herb" pronounced by most people?
            • John Pullen
              In my speech I would drop the h in herbal, but retain it for the other two words. It may be because of the way the other two words are split for separate
              Message 6 of 21 , Aug 29, 2005
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                In my speech I would drop the h in herbal, but retain it for the other two words. It may be because of the way the other two words are split for separate syllables.

                Thanks for your help and I think as in Canada there are many Americans who will say a herb, but I am of the opinion that an herb is more common.

                john



                fshdt <tibbetts@...> wrote:
                I'm told Canadians use both herb and 'erb.
                How does US English deal with "herbaceous" "herbal" and "herbivore"?
                Do they all lose their 'h' when spoken?
              • fshdt
                According to the site below, 90% of Americans say erb and erb is standard US English. Worldwide, with UK, Australia, India, Malaysia etc. the two are
                Message 7 of 21 , Aug 29, 2005
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                  According to the site below, 90% of Americans say 'erb and 'erb is
                  standard US English. Worldwide, with UK, Australia, India, Malaysia
                  etc. the two are probably evenly balanced. If you count English as a
                  second language speakers, the large number of learners of British
                  English in Europe, Africa and elsewhere probably tip the balance
                  towards "herb". Not counting ze French, of course, who quite
                  inadvertently pronounce it ze American way.

                  Dick

                  http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-her1.htm

                  [Q] From Ian Harrison in South Africa: "Although this is not strictly
                  a word query, seeing that you have mentioned the Longman
                  Pronunciation Dictionary, I have wondered why on several American TV
                  programmes, the characters pronounce the word herb without the h. Is
                  this general or just a regional dialect?"

                  [A] It is standard American English; in a 1993 pronunciation survey
                  quoted in the Longman Pronunciation Dictionary, 90% of Americans used
                  the pronunciation without the h. (They do, however, sound it in the
                  proper name Herb.) It does sound odd to anybody from another
                  English-language community; to drop the h in British English, for
                  example, would be classed as a solecism of the deepest hue, whereas in
                  the USA it's a mistake to sound it.

                  It's an example of a type of linguistic conservatism sometimes found
                  in American English. Until the sixteenth century the word was usually
                  spelled erb—the English got it from the French, who didn't say the
                  first letter either. Down to the nineteenth century, long after the h
                  had been added under later French influence, that was also the way it
                  was said. The seventeenth- and eighteenth-century American colonists
                  took this state of affairs with them. During the nineteenth century,
                  British people began to say the first letter, as a result of what
                  linguists call a spelling pronunciation.

                  So Americans kept the old pronunciation while British speakers changed
                  it. A sneaky trick, but there it is.
                • Jane Purchase
                  I think it depends where you come from. In Australia we say a herb - the h is pronounced. We hate it when people say erb . Jane
                  Message 8 of 21 , Aug 29, 2005
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                    I think it depends where you come from.

                    In Australia we say 'a herb' - the 'h' is pronounced. We hate it when
                    people say 'erb'.

                    Jane
                  • John Pullen
                    Thanks Dick, that was a lot of interesting information. I passed it along to my former student. john fshdt wrote: According to the site
                    Message 9 of 21 , Aug 30, 2005
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                      Thanks Dick, that was a lot of interesting information. I passed it along to my former student.

                      john

                      fshdt <tibbetts@...> wrote:
                      According to the site below, 90% of Americans say 'erb and 'erb is
                      standard US English. Worldwide, with UK, Australia, India, Malaysia
                      etc. the two are probably evenly balanced.
                    • william donnelly
                      ... Bit of a tempest in a teapot. The taboo against dropping one s initial h and sounding cockney -- one must always aspirate one s h s -- causes trouble
                      Message 10 of 21 , Aug 30, 2005
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                        Halima Brewer <halibrewer@...> wrote:John Pullen wrote:
                        > How is the word "herb" pronounced by most people? >


                        Bit of a tempest in a teapot. The taboo against dropping one's initial "h" and sounding cockney -- one must always aspirate one's "h"s -- causes trouble all over the late Brit Empire. East Jamaican English patois pronounces, e. g., "ant" as "hant","egg" as "hegg." Hence, "Bring de hegg over 'ere." High marks for effort. Correct is what works where you are.
                      • Russ Taylor
                        . Correct is what works ... And correct is also what works depending on whether they are going to be taking any international exams, and if so, which ones. I
                        Message 11 of 21 , Aug 30, 2005
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                          . Correct is what works
                          > where you are.

                          And correct is also what works depending on whether
                          they are going to be taking any international exams,
                          and if so, which ones. I don't think "'erb" would pass
                          muster in a Trinity spoken test or an IELTS exam, for
                          example.

                          Russ Taylor
                        • Halima Brewer
                          ... That is British versus American pronunciation. An American would say I have a herb garden, but he probably wouldn t quite as often as a Brit would. Halima
                          Message 12 of 21 , Aug 30, 2005
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                            John Pullen wrote:
                            > How is the word "herb" pronounced by most people? >


                            That is British versus American pronunciation. An American would say I
                            have a herb garden, but he probably wouldn't quite as often as a Brit
                            would.

                            Halima
                          • fshdt
                            ... IELTS say they are international. They should not penalize students for US pronunciation and nor should Trinity. If you find any evidence that they do you
                            Message 13 of 21 , Aug 31, 2005
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                              --- In TEFLChina@yahoogroups.com, Russ Taylor <russssch@y...> wrote:
                              >
                              >
                              > . Correct is what works
                              > > where you are.
                              >
                              > And correct is also what works depending on whether
                              > they are going to be taking any international exams,
                              > and if so, which ones. I don't think "'erb" would pass
                              > muster in a Trinity spoken test or an IELTS exam, for
                              > example.
                              >
                              > Russ Taylor


                              IELTS say they are international. They should not penalize students
                              for US pronunciation and nor should Trinity. If you find any evidence
                              that they do you should complain volubly and vociferously. An
                              international exam should be able to cope with international Englishes.

                              Yes, I know TOEFL won't accept British English but it was set up as an
                              American test and this is one of its flaws. I think it will eventually
                              change if it wants to be a useable qualification worldwide.

                              Dick Tibbetts
                              Macau
                            • Nelson Bank
                              ... one ballot for an herb garden Nelson
                              Message 14 of 21 , Aug 31, 2005
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                                >it is appropriate to say, "I have an herb garden."

                                one ballot for "an herb garden"
                                Nelson
                              • Tom Zurinskas
                                In m-w.com the phonetic entry is below. You can click on the icon and hear the words spoken. The speaker says erb Main Entry: herb Pronunciation: &rb, US
                                Message 15 of 21 , Aug 31, 2005
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                                  In m-w.com the phonetic entry is below. You can click on the icon and hear
                                  the words spoken. The speaker says "erb"

                                  Main Entry: herb
                                  Pronunciation: '&rb, US also and British usually 'h&rb




                                  Truespel Book One: Analysis of the Sounds (Phonemes) of USA English
                                  http://www.authorhouse.com/bookstore/itemdetail.aspx?bookid=16593

                                  Convert English to truespel (USA accent) by copy/pasting at
                                  http://www.foreignword.com/dictionary/truespel/transpel.htm

                                  Truespel is the world's first keyboard friendly pronunciation guide spelling
                                  system. See truespel.com.




                                  >From: Nelson Bank <natlunla@...>
                                  > >it is appropriate to say, "I have an herb garden."
                                  >
                                  >one ballot for "an herb garden"
                                • davekees
                                  Examiners, because they must be experienced teachers, are supposed to know that in some English speaking regions this is done differently and to allow it. I
                                  Message 16 of 21 , Sep 1, 2005
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                                    Examiners, because they must be experienced teachers, are supposed to
                                    know that in some English speaking regions this is done differently and
                                    to allow it. I was trained as an IELTS examiner in 2000.

                                    Dave



                                    IELTS say they are international... Yes, I know TOEFL won't accept British English but ...
                                    Dick Tibbetts
                                    Macau
                                  • Bruce Moon
                                    Here s one American who would say an herb garden . Bruce Moon
                                    Message 17 of 21 , Sep 1, 2005
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                                      Here's one American who would say "an herb garden".

                                      Bruce Moon
                                    • Tom Zurinskas
                                      ... Thanks Bruce, Why would you say an in front of herb . You only should say an if the next word begins with a vowel. Could it be the h is silent? tz
                                      Message 18 of 21 , Sep 3, 2005
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                                        >From: "Bruce Moon" <bmoon@...>
                                        >
                                        >Here's one American who would say "an herb garden".
                                        >
                                        >Bruce Moon


                                        Thanks Bruce,

                                        Why would you say "an" in front of "herb". You only should say "an" if the
                                        next word begins with a vowel. Could it be the "h" is silent?

                                        tz
                                      • fshdt
                                        MODERATOR NOTE: This thread (at least the part about the pronunciation of herb ) seems to be fairly well concluded now. Thanks to the present author and
                                        Message 19 of 21 , Sep 3, 2005
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                                          MODERATOR NOTE:

                                          This thread (at least the part about the pronunciation
                                          of 'herb') seems to be fairly well concluded now. Thanks
                                          to the present author and everyone else who contributed!

                                          Further posts on this thread will not be accepted unless
                                          you have something important to add that hasn't already
                                          been said.

                                          Thanks.
                                          --------------------------------------------


                                          I'm not sure what the fuss is about. Users of different
                                          Englishes pronounce herb in different ways. Most users of
                                          English choose a/an from pronunciation and so an herb and
                                          a herb are both acceptable. Both are used by large numbers
                                          of speakers of English. I teach what I use but I don't
                                          decry other users' pronunciation and the associated
                                          article use.

                                          Votes for "an herb" or "a herb" don't get us anywhere.
                                          Americans say "an 'erb" and others say "a herb". Can you
                                          really say we Brits, Australians, South Africans are wrong
                                          and Americans are right? Or vice versa? I think you have to
                                          give learners your English but accept other major varieties.
                                          Being too prescriptive in this instance is, I believe, a
                                          big mistake.

                                          Dick Tibbetts
                                          Macau
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