Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: (teach) Materials for Q.M.

Expand Messages
  • Wayne Barnes Ewell
    ... with the ... bringing ... classes I teach the history and culture of America. I have found that many of the students are interesteing in learing all they
    Message 1 of 12 , Aug 1, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In TEFLChina@yahoogroups.com, "dk" <davkees@p...> wrote:
      >
      > John Ball "The obvious one is a head to head debate to coincide
      with the
      > coming U.S Presidential Elections."
      >
      > Si: "That would be rather interesting, but do you really think
      bringing
      > politics into the classroom is a good idea?"
      >
      >
      > Dave, that is exactly what I have done in my classroom. In my adult
      classes I teach the history and culture of America. I have found that
      many of the students are interesteing in learing all they can about
      the worlds only super power.

      I do not skirt the issues either. I have talked about America from its
      early beginning and the winning of independence from England. I have
      had the students read the Declaration of Independence so that they may
      understand why we fought for independence from the King and what we
      feel about freedom.

      I have discussed the civil war and the reason it was fought. I have
      had the students read Lincoln's Gettysburg Addres as well as Uncle
      Toms Cabin.

      I do not avoid any issues including the mistakes we have made with
      Iraq. I tell them the good, the bad and the ugly about America. I
      want them to know that every country, including a super power, makes
      makes mistakes. But unlike other countries we have recourse to correct
      these mistakes. They have also learned about our great court system
      and how it operates from the local level all the way up to the Supreme
      Court.

      We have discussed the election. I have given them links to the
      campaigns of both candidates as well as a link to the official US
      government web site for facts about the government.

      Information is power. So I have told them that if they wish to be
      powerful they need to learn all they can. They should gather as much
      information from as many different sources as possible.

      They have ben given links to some of our best and most respected
      newespapers, The New York Times and The Washington Post. I tell them
      that these are trusted newspapers. That Americans when asked which
      professions then trust most, they always put reporters near the top of
      the list, also, politicians are near the bottom along with lawyers.

      I feel it is important to not only teach English but to teach good
      citizenship. I find that having students talk and discuss issues that
      they are the most interested in is the best way to keep the
      conversations flowing.

      This has been a very succeessul formula for me. It might not be right
      for everyone. But since I am more seasoned than many of my younger
      peers, I am able to discuss all of these issues with the knowledge
      one gains from wisdom as he or she grows older. I am sure you
      understand this point.

      Just for your information, the school I teach at is the most expensive
      English school in Dalian so most of the students are from the more
      privledged families, government officials, military, police, etc. This
      might help illuminate the situation a bit more.

      "Ask questions. Seek answers. Embrace truth"


      Just my thoughts on a very imporant matter.
      Wayne Ewell....teaching in Dalian and a long way from home....USA

      PS If we are going to be here teaching English I think we should make
      the most of our time. It is like 'killing two birds with one stone'.



      > Dave Kees
      > |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
      > dk@d... - Guangzhou, China - www.davekees.com
    • Sheila Cornelius
      dk wrote: In a normal classroom 100% of your students will agree that Taiwan should return to China. It s almost unheard of
      Message 2 of 12 , Aug 1, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        dk <davkees@...> wrote:
        In a normal
        classroom 100% of your students will agree that Taiwan should return to
        China. It's almost unheard of for even one student to disagree with this
        position.


        When I was proof-reading national band six examination materials last year one of the sentences was:

        'As everyone knows, Taiwan is a province of China.'

        I think they had to choose the appropriate qualifying phrase from a choice of four, but this was the correct sentence.

        So it is not so surprising the students also hold this opinion.

        Next week I have my Taiwanese ex language partner visiting London. He has quite different views about the matter.

        Sheila













        ---------------------------------
        Do you Yahoo!?
        Yahoo! Mail - 50x more storage than other providers!

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • fshdt
        ... . ... I think there is a danger here and that the teacher should tread very carefully. It s almost impossible for the teacher to take a neutral viewpoint,
        Message 3 of 12 , Aug 1, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          > > Dave, that is exactly what I have done in my classroom. In my adult
          > classes I teach the history and culture of America. ...

          > I do not skirt the issues either. ...
          >
          > I do not avoid any issues including the mistakes we have made with
          > Iraq. I tell them the good, the bad and the ugly about America. I
          > want them to know that every country, including a super power, makes
          > makes mistakes. But unlike other countries we have recourse to correct
          > these mistakes. They have also learned about our great court system
          > and how it operates from the local level all the way up to the Supreme
          > Court.
          >

          >
          > Information is power. So I have told them that if they wish to be
          > powerful they need to learn all they can. They should gather as much
          > information from as many different sources as possible.
          >
          > They have ben given links to some of our best and most respected
          > newespapers, The New York Times and The Washington Post. I tell them
          > that these are trusted newspapers.
          >


          > Wayne Ewell....teaching in Dalian and a long way from home....USA
          >
          .
          >
          I think there is a danger here and that the teacher should tread very
          carefully. It's almost impossible for the teacher to take a neutral
          viewpoint, divorced from culture and background but we need to make an
          effort to try and to clearly signal the difference between our
          opinions, attitudes to and interpretations of facts from more neutral
          information. Whether the US has corrected the faulty decisions and
          attitudes in its foreign policy over the past 100 years is, of course,
          debatable. The US court system is not so great in that black murderers
          are four times more likely to die for their crime as white murderers.
          The NYT and other newspapers appear to have operated under a degree of
          self censorship in recent years. I'm not US baiting, I'm just saying
          that items you are presenting as information may not be as impartial
          as all that. Even if you give more than one side of an argument the
          presentation is usually slanted.

          This isn't to say that China, Britain or any other countries are any
          better. In fact, the Chinese press and justice system would be
          substantially improved if they operated on US lines. It's just that we
          are language teachers, teaching English as an international language
          and if we teach culture we are probably better employed teaching it
          from a sociolinguistic perspective rather than a political perspective.

          > PS If we are going to be here teaching English I think we should make
          > the most of our time. It is like 'killing two birds with one stone'
          Wayne

          Now, what is the difference between "If we are going to be here
          teaching English I think ...", "If we are here teaching English I
          think ..." and "We are here teaching English and I think ..."?

          What exactly is the second bird?

          Dick Tibbetts
          University of Macau
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.