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getting feedback from students

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  • karenstanleyma
    The official student opinion surveys that my students fill out about their courses/teachers give me very little real/useful information about course content
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 30, 2003
      The official "student opinion surveys" that my students
      fill out about their courses/teachers give me very little
      real/useful information about course content or teaching
      methodology. As a result, I've been developing my own ways
      of getting useful feedback from students.

      This term I've taught a pronunciation course (75 minutes
      two afternoons a week) for the first time. About a third
      of the way through the term, I had students give me
      suggestions about activities (it took some urging, but I
      did get suggested activities from about one third of the
      students - they could give it to me anonymously if they
      wished, but all of them identified themselves). Then I did
      a class survey in which I listed the activities we had been
      doing with three categories: "more" "just enough" "less".
      I then listed the suggestions for new activities with two
      possibilities: "good idea" and "maybe not".

      Of course, with each current activity the largest number
      of votes was always for more, and large numbers of people
      wanted all the new activities. However, putting aside the
      impossibility of having more of everything within the same
      time frame, I was able to identify one current activity
      that almost the entire class wanted more of, see that
      there was one current activity in which about 25 percent
      (rather than 0-8 percent) wanted less of, and I figured out
      a way to incorporate the important aspects of two of the new
      suggestions in a way that (long term at least) will reduce
      my preparation time.

      What are other people doing to get useful feedback from
      their students?

      Karen
      karen.stanley @ cpcc.edu
      Charlotte, North Carolina, USA
    • dk
      ...or are those kiwis yanking our chain? Auckland University researchers have stunned academics around the world by tracing the origins of the English language
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 1, 2003
        ...or are those kiwis yanking our chain?

        Auckland University researchers have stunned academics around the world by
        tracing the origins of the English language to Turkish farmers...
        http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/11/30/1070127275013.html


        Dave Kees
        Guangzhou

        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        Reflective teaching in China
        www.davekees.com
      • Frank Doonan
        Turkey is a crossroads throughout the history of humanity including the Neanderthals who went to Eurasia first. It is the birth place of the iron age and other
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 1, 2003
          Turkey is a crossroads throughout the history of humanity including the Neanderthals who went to Eurasia first. It is the birth place of the iron age and other important developments of human civilization. It is a natural focal point for finding some of the origins of our languages.

          It does not mean that all our linguistic heratage originated there. Linguistics have determined that all languages share certain characteristics that are dependent on the nature of our vocal capabilities and physical makeup and related only to the earliest human families that developed speech the parents of us all from AFRICA.

          Frank
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