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FW: [TESLCA-L] Teaching English with Technology, vol. 3, no. 3, July-August 2003

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  • dk
    This was an announcement on another list. Perhaps TEFL-China members who are interested in computer assisted language learning will be interested. - Dave Kees
    Message 1 of 10 , Aug 31, 2003
      This was an announcement on another list. Perhaps TEFL-China members who are
      interested in computer assisted language learning will be interested. - Dave
      Kees

      `````````````````````````````````````````

      Dear Listers,
      I am writing to inform you that the July-August issue of Teaching English
      with Technology is up on the Web at
      http://www.iatefl.org.pl/call/callnl.htm. In this issue, you can find the
      following contributions:

      Articles:
      "Overview of Computer-Assisted Language Learning Research with Second
      Language Acquisition Perspectives" by Hee-Jung Jung
      "CALL-ing EAP Skills" by Anna Franca Plastina
      Internet Lesson Plans:
      "Learner-Generated Quizzes" by Galina Kavaliauskiene
      A Word from a Techie:
      "Adding Spell Checker in Internet Explorer to Enhance Web-Based Writing" by
      Guo Shesen

      Software:
      "Speech Recognition Software: Its Possible Impact on the Language Learning
      Classroom" by Gina Mikel Petrie
      "Quick Placement Test on CD" reviewed by Andrzej Zychla
      Reports from Past Events:
      "Computer-Mediated Lexicography" by Jarek Krajka
      "ICT in ELT - 2nd International Conference Teaching Teachers to Teach
      Through Technology 6T/60" by Jarek Krajka
      You are also invited to browse through the back issues of the Journal, which
      can be accessed by clicking on "Previous Issues" in the menu.
      If you are interested in receiving a new issue of the Journal regularly by
      email, please email the editor at the email below with the subject being
      "Journal Subscription".
      Also, Teaching English with Technology is constantly encouraging
      contributions in all Journal sections. For details, please email the editor
      at the email below with the subject being "Journal Submission".

      Best regards,

      Dr Jarek Krajka, Ph.D.
      Editor, "Teaching English with Technology"
      http://www.iatefl.org.pl/call/callnl.htm
      Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin, Poland
      jarek.krajka@...; jkrajka@...


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      See the TESL-L website for guidelines and information on managing
      your list and branch subscriptions:
      http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/~tesl-l/X-No-Archive: yes
      Dear Listers,
      I am writing to inform you that the July-August issue of Teaching English
      with Technology is up on the Web at
      http://www.iatefl.org.pl/call/callnl.htm. In this issue, you can find the
      following contributions:
      Articles:
      "Overview of Computer-Assisted Language Learning Research with Second
      Language Acquisition Perspectives" by Hee-Jung Jung
      "CALL-ing EAP Skills" by Anna Franca Plastina
      Internet Lesson Plans:
      "Learner-Generated Quizzes" by Galina Kavaliauskiene
      A Word from a Techie:
      "Adding Spell Checker in Internet Explorer to Enhance Web-Based Writing" by
      Guo Shesen
      Software:
      "Speech Recognition Software: Its Possible Impact on the Language Learning
      Classroom" by Gina Mikel Petrie
      "Quick Placement Test on CD" reviewed by Andrzej Zychla
      Reports from Past Events:
      "Computer-Mediated Lexicography" by Jarek Krajka
      "ICT in ELT - 2nd International Conference Teaching Teachers to Teach
      Through Technology 6T/60" by Jarek Krajka
      You are also invited to browse through the back issues of the Journal, which
      can be accessed by clicking on "Previous Issues" in the menu.
      If you are interested in receiving a new issue of the Journal regularly by
      email, please email the editor at the email below with the subject being
      "Journal Subscription".
      Also, Teaching English with Technology is constantly encouraging
      contributions in all Journal sections. For details, please email the editor
      at the email below with the subject being "Journal Submission".
      Best regards,
      Dr Jarek Krajka, Ph.D.
      Editor, "Teaching English with Technology"
      http://www.iatefl.org.pl/call/callnl.htm
      Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin, Poland
      jarek.krajka@...; jkrajka@...
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      See the TESL-L website for guidelines and information on managing
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    • dk
      So I am busy searching for things to do in the first few days to set the tone for a good fun learning environment for them.....and wonder if anyone can
      Message 2 of 10 , Aug 31, 2003
        "So I am busy searching for things to do in the first few days to set the
        tone for a good fun learning environment for them.....and wonder if anyone
        can quickly share some ideas with me for first day etc."

        Sara, the first thing you can do is to check the TEFL-China archives for all
        the tips that are given to all new teachers every September.

        groups.yahoo.com/group/teflchina/messages

        (We should just make a FAQ of this stuff and send it out each year
        automatically.)

        You seem (but perhaps I've misunderstood) not only new to China but new to
        teaching ESL. I going to offer a few basic ideas. I'm going to address this
        broadly to perhaps help many new teachers. Forgive me if I state the
        obvious.

        Karen Stanley just put this message up which points to a good starting
        place:

        ````````````````````````````````````
        For fairly new members of the
        TEACH list, there is a website
        with lots of materials and
        ideas for teaching and
        assessment, as well as
        cultural information, at

        http://www.teflchina.org/teach/index.htm

        ````````````````````````````````````

        Your photo idea is good. Students really want to learn what the grass is
        like on the other side of the fence. I often intersperse my lessons with
        anecdotes about myself, usually making fun of myself. (Everyone else makes
        fun of me, why shouldn't I?) Actually, the students will probably happily
        sit there for hours listening to stories. (But when another teacher
        questions them what they are learning about English they'll tell them they
        are learning nothing.)

        However, before hitting the book, begin every lesson with something fun for
        the students. There are a lot of game activities at the site Karen mentions.
        One thing to remember, the more effort you put into creating a game is not
        reflected in more fun for the students. Some of the simplest things can be
        the most fun and the most educational for the students. And some of the
        projects that take hours to prepare and photocopy and cut out can totally
        fall flat.

        I have written a long series of such fun (and usually educational)
        activities in a series of messages with "LIMO" in the subject. LIMO means
        Little In Much Out. You can search the message archive.

        Warming up the students is so important. It is the farmer breaking the earth
        before planting. It is the house painter sanding the surface before
        painting. It is the warm-up band who comes out and plays before the Rolling
        Stones perform. It makes it easy for the students to be good.

        On your first day three short games are not too many.

        I learned this good tip on this list, sorry I don't recall from whom, and
        have modified it a bit. After the game but before the book I give the
        students a topic (food, sports, books, movies, etc.) and I organize students
        for pair work, A & B. First "A" will talk for one-minute (IN ENGLISH)
        non-stop about the subject with no interruptions from "B". If "A" can't
        think of what to say then "A" should say, "Talk, talk, talk, talk..." Then
        "B" talks for a minute. Then "A" again one minute and then "B". Walk around
        and listen to everybody.

        (With 40 students I find it easy to listen to EVERYBODY but to try to listen
        just to one student nearly impossible. I'm thinking about getting one of
        those 'old-fashioned' ear horns that people who were hard of hearing used to
        use 100 years ago, because during pair work there is so much noise I can't
        hear what the students are saying.)

        This seems to help get ALL the students into an English speaking mood and is
        a pedagogically sound activity (when taken in moderation and as prescribed
        by a doctor.)

        To make it even more pedagogical I sometimes use a neat little book I found
        here in China called "A Concise Dictionary of Spoken English Expressions".
        (Info below.) This book is a collection of common things we say to express
        agreement/disagreement, give opinions or ask opinions, express excitement,
        preference, etc, etc. Sometimes before I begin one of these minute chat
        sessions I'll write on the board one set of these expressions for the
        students to use. They like learning and practicing these sorts of things and
        will write it down in their notebooks.

        The games should take 10-15 minutes and the talking about 5 minutes. That's
        a lot of your class time but this is the first time with the class so it's
        good to kick-off with a bit of fun. Now we're almost ready to start the
        lesson but one more thing and this is serious.

        Explain clearly how you are going to teach them and why you are going to
        teach them this way. The style of the western teacher is often in contrast
        to the so-called traditional approach that students are used to. The
        difference is great. They like to sit and passively listen to the teacher.
        The students cannot see the pedagogy of what you are doing if you don't
        explain it.

        They can easily believe role-play and pair work are a waste of time.
        Professor Li Mingsheng, one of our distinguished Chinese colleagues on this
        list, produced some rather shocking research findings on how bad foreign
        English teachers appeared in the eyes of their Chinese students. No doubt
        some of these teachers must have been 'backpackers', lacking in proper
        skills and not conducting themselves in a professional manner. But as I said
        before, the interactive communicative western way is almost a "classroom
        culture shock" for students at first. Once explained and understood, once
        students are assured of the soundness of the approach and if the teacher
        carries it out and conducts him-/herself in a professional manner the
        students will appreciate it and prefer it. (This is according to some small
        scale trial research I've conducted at one school.)

        Well, let's not forget the book. Hopefully, after getting your students all
        stirred up and excited the book won't put them to sleep.

        Best wishes,

        Dave Kees
        Guangzhou

        "A Concise Dictionary of Spoken English Expressions", ISBN 7-81046-409-4,
        (published 1999), 20 Rmb. at your local bookstore featuring ESL books.
      • dk
        Blackboard Expands Reach in Deal to Set Up Chinese Colleges With Its Software By BRIAN KNOWLTON - NY Times WASHINGTON, Aug. 30 — Just six years after it was
        Message 3 of 10 , Sep 1, 2003
          Blackboard Expands Reach in Deal to Set Up Chinese Colleges With Its
          Software
          By BRIAN KNOWLTON - NY Times

          WASHINGTON, Aug. 30 — Just six years after it was founded by two new
          graduates of American University, Blackboard Inc., an electronic-learning
          company, has won a deal in China that has eluded many a more seasoned
          company.

          Blackboard is expected to announce on Tuesday that it has entered a
          partnership with the Chinese public-private education company Cernet, which
          provides Internet services to more than 1,000 universities in China, to
          create a software platform that will allow professors to post course
          materials, conduct discussions and administer tests online.

          Read the full story at:
          http://www.nytimes.com/2003/09/01/technology/01BLAC.html?th
        • Traci Arkinstall
          Sara try these sites: www.onestopenglish.com www.themoonlitroad.com I also did well with grade 6 primary students and middle school students with short
          Message 4 of 10 , Sep 1, 2003
            Sara try these sites:
            www.onestopenglish.com
            www.themoonlitroad.com

            I also did well with grade 6 primary students and middle school
            students with short episodes of Mr Bean... they are laughing so
            much they just speak .. when I asked them what happened...

            Sara Birken <sara_birken@...> wrote:

            ...found out yesterday I am to teach grade 1 (aged 15 or 16) and grade 2 (same age) who all have very limited English. I think for the grade 1 students I will be the first foreign teacher they have had or seen!!! The students I have met from one of my 8 classes are incredibly shy. Each class has around 42 students so I want to make sure they all get the best out of our time together.

            So I am busy searching for things to do in the first few days to set the tone for a good fun learning environment for them.....and wonder if anyone can quickly share some ideas with me for first day etc.
          • Stephen Jobson
            Is anyone familiar with this book Reading Course in American and British News Publications ? Stephen
            Message 5 of 10 , Sep 1, 2003
              Is anyone familiar with this book "Reading Course in American and British News Publications"?

              Stephen
            • dk
              We all have to deal with plagiarism from time to time. To help us (especially us foreign teachers) keep it in perspective, especially the fact that it is not
              Message 6 of 10 , Sep 3, 2003
                We all have to deal with plagiarism from time to time. To help us
                (especially us foreign teachers) keep it in perspective, especially the fact
                that it is not just a China thing as some allude to, here is an excerpt from an article in today's NY Times.

                ``````````````````````````````````````

                A study conducted on 23 college campuses has found that Internet plagiarism
                is rising among students.

                Thirty-eight percent of the undergraduate students surveyed said that in the
                last year they had engaged in one or more instances of "cut-and-paste"
                plagiarism involving the Internet, paraphrasing or copying anywhere from a
                few sentences to a full paragraph from the Web without citing the source.
                Almost half the students said they considered such behavior trivial or not
                cheating at all.

                Only 10 percent of students had acknowledged such cheating in a similar, but
                much smaller survey three years ago.

                Professor McCabe said: "Students will say they're just mimicking what goes
                on in society with business leaders, politicians. I don't know whether
                they're making excuses for what they've already done, or whether they're
                saying, `It's O.K. if I do this because of what's going on.' "

                http://www.nytimes.com/2003/09/03/education/03CHEA.html?th
                ``````````````````````````````````````

                Dave Kees
                Guangzhou
              • dk
                Have you heard of the water bottle trick? Be prepared. Here are some more interesting comments and justifications for cheating from students as well as tricks
                Message 7 of 10 , Sep 3, 2003
                  Have you heard of the water bottle trick? Be prepared.

                  Here are some more interesting comments and justifications for cheating from
                  students as well as tricks they use to cheat taken from the same NYT
                  article.

                  Dave Kees

                  ````````````````````````````````

                  Water-Bottle Tricks

                  Some of the comments submitted anonymously by college students who took part
                  in a survey about cheating:

                  If teachers taught better we wouldn't have to cheat.

                  Maybe schools and parents should focus on learning instead of grades.

                  You can't stop it. . . . Some people were just raised that way — "do
                  whatever you have to do."

                  In my freshman biology class, our professor would give us the answers to the
                  test once we finished and turned in the test, so we could figure out what we
                  missed before he got them out to us. One student turned in the test, went
                  back to get his book bag and gave the sheet of paper to his friend who was
                  still taking the test.

                  Someone I know once soaked the label off a water bottle, printed up a fake
                  label, copied notes onto the back of the fake label, and pasted it back onto
                  the water bottle. During the test, he had the water bottle on his desk. He'd
                  take a drink, read the exposed line through the bottle and write down the
                  answer.

                  `````````````````````````````````````
                • Frank Doonan
                  It is true plagerism is not a Chinese thing, traditionally plagerism in China is not plagerism. Copying works in the west has been traditionally immoral and
                  Message 8 of 10 , Sep 5, 2003
                    It is true plagerism is not a Chinese thing, traditionally plagerism in China is not plagerism. Copying works in the west has been traditionally immoral and illegal in the west, but in China not so. In China creative original writing has not been part of Chinese education for thousands of years. This aspect of education did not become part of the Chinese educational system until the last thirty years. For thousands of years copying paintings, sculpture and literary works have always been considered a good thing and contributed immortality of the artist or author. Original creative works of art and literature usually did not come until later in life if ever.

                    The greatest and only truely creative period of great thinkers and creative writers in Chinese history was the Shang and the Zhou Dynasties.

                    Frank

                    dk <davkees@...> wrote:
                    We all have to deal with plagiarism from time to time. To help us
                    (especially us foreign teachers) keep it in perspective, especially the fact
                    that it is not just a China thing as some allude to, here is an excerpt from an article in today's NY Times

                    ---------------------------------
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                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • karenstanleyma
                    ... plagerism in China is not plagerism. Copying works in the west has been traditionally immoral and illegal in the west, but in China not so. In China
                    Message 9 of 10 , Sep 6, 2003
                      Frank Doonan wrote:
                      > It is true plagerism is not a Chinese thing, traditionally
                      plagerism in China is not plagerism. Copying works in the west has
                      been traditionally immoral and illegal in the west, but in China not
                      so. In China creative original writing has not been part of Chinese
                      education for thousands of years. This aspect of education did not
                      become part of the Chinese educational system until the last thirty
                      years. For thousands of years copying paintings, sculpture and
                      literary works have always been considered a good thing and
                      contributed immortality of the artist or author. Original creative
                      works of art and literature usually did not come until later in life
                      if ever.
                      >

                      ----
                      In the December 2002 issue of the TESL-EJ Forum column, "Perspectives
                      on Plagiarism in the ESL/EFL Classroom" (a compilation of selected
                      posts on the topic) at
                      http://www.kyoto-su.ac.jp/information/tesl-ej/ej23/f1.html

                      Laurie Lew offers some comments on the topic of plagiarism in China.
                      Below is an excerpt from her contribution:

                      "I've taught in Beijing for over 10 years and plagiarism comes up
                      again and again. While it's true that Chinese are taught to imitate
                      and copy "beautiful" phrases and sentences when learning to write in
                      Chinese, it's also true that the readers (teacher) _know_ it is
                      imitation and copying, even if they don't know the exact source, as
                      in the case of a proverb. When students plagiarize in English,
                      they're hoping that I believe it's their work. I point out this
                      difference at the beginning of each writing course. I also have
                      students do lots of writing in class to get them into the habit of
                      writing directly in English on their own.

                      Students know that copying from another during a test is cheating and
                      when they do it, they hope they don't get caught. How the culture
                      views cheating in general is another matter."
                      ------

                      Karen Stanley, Charlotte, North Carolina, USA
                      karen.stanley @ cpcc.edu
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