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Re: HELP, teaching primary students

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  • Ria Smit
    Alan, what is your book? I used OXFORD ENGLISH published by Oxford University Press and Shanghai Education Research Press, (or something like that). Brilliant
    Message 1 of 16 , Sep 5, 2013
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      Alan, what is your book?

      I used OXFORD ENGLISH published by Oxford University Press and Shanghai Education Research Press, (or something like that).  Brilliant books, with a work book.

      First lesson, first thing they teach is SIT DOWN, STAND UP, OPEN YOUR BOOK, CLOSE YOUR BOOK.  Easy to understand without Chinese because it is all able to be demonstrated, and essential class language.  Get groups to give each other the commands and they are on their way with confidence.

      Ria
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    • Merton Bland
      I want to thank Nelson Bank for his kind words. Yes, I believe in immersion from day one, Usually the first time we meet I gather the class around the door
      Message 2 of 16 , Sep 6, 2013
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        I want to thank Nelson Bank for his kind words. Yes, I believe in immersion from day one, Usually the first time we meet I gather the class around the door and point to the door sill and tell them that "out there you can speak anything you want, but in here only English is allowed." Sometimes I even follow this up by pretending to strangle anyone I hear deviating from this English Only rule.

        My reference to "the chains that bind vocabulary in the native language to vocabulary in the target language is best expressed in S-R bond theory where S=stimulus, R=response, and IR=Intermediate Response. When someone asks me a question in my native language it's a simple S->R thing: I hear the the question (S) and I answer it (R). Unfortunately many of our students emerge from our EFL classes with the following chain: S->IR->IR->IR->R imbedded in them. They hear the question in the target language, translate it internally into the native language, formulate a response, translate that into the target language, and articulate the answer. What a waste of time.

        Mert - Dr. Merton L. Bland, Arlington, VA USA
      • Alan alan
        Thanks Peg, I found http://genkienglish.net/ very useful Alan Simpson
        Message 3 of 16 , Sep 6, 2013
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          Thanks Peg,
          I found http://genkienglish.net/ very useful
           
          Alan Simpson
           
        • Nelson Bank
          It seems that if there is a memorized response to a stimulus, be it I m fine, and you? to Hi, how are
          Message 4 of 16 , Sep 7, 2013
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            <S=stimulus, R=response, and IR=Intermediate Response>

            It seems that if there is a memorized response to a stimulus, be it 'I'm fine, and you?' to 'Hi, how are you?', then learned 2nd language would be memorized and not understood.  Obviously this is not the case.  Somewhere down the line, even in an immersion classroom, meaning in L1 is taking place.  This meaning is the stimulus for the response in L2.  How fast it takes place would seem to be determined by number of usages of the same S-IR-R patter.  At speed X (5 usages of the particular patter), it (S-IR-R) doesn't seem slow.

            Nelson
          • Alan alan
            I have always loved teaching in China, as it s always been university & I know I make a difference. Now I m teaching primary school kids, 44 kids in a class,
            Message 5 of 16 , Sep 11, 2013
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              I have always loved teaching in China, as it's always been university & I know I make a difference.



              Now I'm teaching primary school kids, 44 kids in a class, 704 students a week.

              So far I've had 3, 4, 5, 6th grades.

              Ria, they have Oxford books, but there are many different ones, such as Oxford reading tree, which they do not use.



              I find it impossible to have discipline.

              The kids only understand 20 – 60% of what I'm saying, so I can understand they get bored.

              I do games, but then they get too excited.

              I try to make the lesson interesting, but 44 kids in a small classroom limits you.

              To get them to listen to me, I've tried:-

              Standing saying nothing to wait for them to stop talking in Chinese.

              Standing outside the classroom to wait for them to stop talking in Chinese.

              Banging on the desk.

              Shouting.

              Saying Shhhhhhhhh

              Nothing works.

              I was told punish the very bad ones, but it's virtually all of them.

              What's the key please?



              I complained to a Chinese teacher so she sat in on my lesson, it made a big difference, they behaved.

              I'm teaching such basic stuff, that if I need a Chinese teacher there for keeping order, then why am I there?

              A Chinese English teacher can teach this more effectively.

              I'm just window dressing, so the kids will say they have a foreign teacher.

              Where do others find job satisfaction of such basic teaching?



              Tomorrow it's 1st grade, they only know a few basic words.

              I watched a Chinese teacher give the same lesson, she spoke Chinese 50% of the time to ensure they could understand.



              Alan Simpson
            • Nelson Bank
              That s the only way I could handle Primary classes.  A
              Message 6 of 16 , Sep 12, 2013
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                <I complained to a Chinese teacher so she sat in on my lesson, it made a big difference, they behaved.>


                That's the only way I could handle Primary classes.  A couple of years more and I could have done it solo.

                Believe me, you are making a difference.  Your students are lucky and privileged to have a native English speaker with them.

                In my progress toward me being the only teacher in the room, I went through some phases, including anger, games, and a lot more.  I could see that the best method was to get to be friends with  my students.  I believe that is the best method in China.  You don't have to have reservations of making friends with your students there.  Parents will follow.  If you open yourself to having Chinese friends of your students and parents, you'll do well.

                Nelson Bank
              • Alan alan
                Nelson, I always make friends with my students, that s why I enjoy teaching. But 44 hyper active students in a class for only 45 mins = impossible. They expect
                Message 7 of 16 , Sep 12, 2013
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                  Nelson, I always make friends with my students, that's why I enjoy teaching.

                  But 44 hyper active students in a class for only 45 mins = impossible.

                  They expect me to give them end of term exams over one period, the mind boggles.

                  I've told my boss it's not working, I'm not here for being window dressing

                  Alan Simpson
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