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Re: (teach) online components to Face-to-Face classes

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  • Nelson Bank
    I try to inject humor in multiple-choice quiz questions, maybe with one or two nonsense answers, and one valid answer to some other type
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 15, 2013
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      <quiz-like structures>


      I try to inject humor in multiple-choice quiz questions, maybe with one or two nonsense answers, and one valid answer to some other type of question.  The real answer sticks out doing this.  I really do not like tricky questions and answers.

      For example:

      What part of sentence usually follows a subject in English?
      a) cranium
      b) a long vowel
      c) 14
      d) a verb, or the predicate

      Nelson

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    • dk
      Have other people had the same experience? Different experiences? What types of online items have you created that TRULY tie in with your classes and which
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 16, 2013
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        "Have other people had the same experience? Different experiences? What
        types of online items have you created that TRULY tie in with your classes
        and which appear to really benefit student learning?"



        One of the smartest things you can do to check out your online teaching
        materials is to look over the shoulder of a student while he works on them
        and then do that again and again with different students.



        When I did that I found my students wanted to breeze through or past the
        instructions, just getting the idea of what they are supposed to do. They
        want to check the questions and then scan the text as quickly as possible
        only to find the answers. Although that is an English skill, that is not how
        I intended them to work through the exercise. It was a rather humbling
        experience for me.



        It is also useful to see what problems the students have with the technology
        and with understanding the exercise or questions.



        More teachers are starting to make video lessons where they talk into the
        camera to the students. This is the trend with all the newest online
        learning courses like Coursera.com. But again, as you begin to learn how to
        do this it is very useful to test it out on a live audience.



        Make your video and play it for a full class. Do they seem interested in it?
        Are they paying attention? Are they yawning? Are they reaching for their
        smart phones? Are they putting their heads down?



        How is the retention? Five minutes after they finish the video, ask a few
        questions to see who remembers the key points. Ask the students to raise
        their hands if they know blah blah blah. When students raise their hands you
        can better see how well the video has penetrated the class.



        Once you have figured out how to make videos that grab their attention in
        the classroom you will have a better ability to make videos that will grab
        their attention when they are alone online. Same with the online exercises
        and questions and answers. When you see how the students interact with them
        you can better understand how to design them.



        Dave Kees







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      • Stephanie Noke
        On Tue, 16 Jul 2013, at 11:32 PM, dk wrote: Have other people had the same experience? Different experiences? What types of online items have you created that
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 16, 2013
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          On Tue, 16 Jul 2013, at 11:32 PM, dk wrote:
          "Have other people had the same experience? Different experiences? What types of online items have you created that TRULY tie in with your classes and which appear to really benefit student learning?"

          How is the retention? Five minutes after they finish the video, ask a few questions to see who remembers the key points. Ask the students to raise their hands if they know blah blah blah. When students raise their hands you can better see how well the video has penetrated the class.

          Dave Kees
          >
          >
          Hi Dave!
          This is a very opportune posting for me as I am currently working on a
          Blended/Agile Learning project. In my own experience, I do not learn
          from Elearning. I can pass any test but retain zilch! I am looking at
          ways to improve retention with online learning. My idea is that it
          should focus on the skill development rather than knowledge extension.
          This is easier for some subjects than others. However, if they actually
          have to complete a physical task using online information I think that
          works better. Of course, that then means that the facilitator must be
          on hand to evaluate - or maybe, not. Maybe the student then has to make
          a webinar/video or similar to show what they did. It requires alot more
          effort to create effective Elearning than f2f I find. I would love to
          hear others' input.

          Cheers
          Stephanie
          --
          Stephanie Noke
          araxy@...


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        • dk
          The problem with a lot of our materials is that we start with some deconstructed element of English that we want to teach our students and we try to make it
          Message 4 of 10 , Jul 17, 2013
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            The problem with a lot of our materials is that we start with some
            deconstructed element of English that we want to teach our students and we
            try to make it interesting. The thing I like about www.englishcentral.com is
            that they start with something incredibly interesting and then draw English
            lessons out of it.



            If it is interesting we can teach our students anything. If it is boring we
            can teach our students nothing.



            Dave Kees





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          • Margaret Orleans
              Dave Kees points out: One of the smartest things you can do to check out your online teaching materials is to look over the shoulder of a student while he
            Message 5 of 10 , Jul 17, 2013
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              Dave Kees points out:

              One of the smartest things you can do to check out your online teaching
              materials is to look over the shoulder of a student while he works on them
              and then do that again and again with different students.

              And I comment:

              I haven't actually put together online materials for more than two classes (one of which was Extensive Reading, with the easy 10-question quizzes from MoodleReader), but something I noticed in Intensive Reading lectures with Japanese female first-year university students was that even when the lecture was based on the questions they had submitted after reading the passages beforehand, many really didn't know how to take appropriate notes, so I started constructing worksheets in which they not only noted down what I considered the key points, but had to come up with their own examples (of words that fit a certain pattern) or applications (of situations in which to use certain phrases) of the principles I was covering.

              I think I would prepare such a form to accompany an online lecture (with immediate feedback, as others have stressed).


              --Peg

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            • Margaret Orleans
              Stephanie suggests: .  My idea is that it should focus on the skill development rather than knowledge extension. This is easier for some subjects than
              Message 6 of 10 , Jul 17, 2013
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                Stephanie suggests:

                .  My idea is that it should focus on the skill development rather than knowledge extension. This is easier for some subjects than others.  However, if they actually have to complete a physical task using online information I think that works better.  Of course, that then means that the facilitator must be on hand to evaluate - or maybe, not.  Maybe the student then has to make a webinar/video or similar to show what they did.  It requires a lot more effort to create effective Elearning than f2f I find.  I would love others' input.


                I comment:

                This was easy to do in a Media English course I taught in a computer lab.  Students in self-selected pairs chose a broad topic related the city or school and each week created an entry for a class blog.  We covered a variety of genres:  announcements, news, reviews, interviews, FAQs, open letters, infographics, etc.  The online component had examples of each genre, along with a couple of poll-type questions.  In class, students could ask for help with their piece before posting it for all the class (and the general public) to enjoy.  They really enjoyed seeing their work "published."

                I think some similar projects could be done for general languages classes as well.

                --Peg

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              • sheila swanson
                I stumbled across a website called blogtalkradio when it was referred to in a post with a guest I was interested in hearing earlier this month. After looking 
                Message 7 of 10 , Jul 28, 2013
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                  I stumbled across a website called blogtalkradio when it was referred to in a post with a guest I was interested in hearing earlier this month. After looking  it up, I thought it might be useful as an ESL/EFL tool for speaking-listening classes.(1) Has anybody  heard of it, and (2)can it be accessed in China ? I think it would be an interesting format and can see the possibilities, if so. They have a free level, more limited but I might try it soon, myself, to see what comes of it.
                  Sheila


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                • WanZJ
                  ... Oh great! We can get access to it in China. I am even able to create my own conversation show. So are my students. thx for sharing. wan zhang jie
                  Message 8 of 10 , Aug 12, 2013
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                    sheila swanson wrote:

                    > I stumbled across a website called blogtalkradio when it was referred to in a post with a guest I was interested in hearing earlier this month. After looking it up, I thought it might be useful as an ESL/EFL tool for speaking-listening classes.(1) Has anybody heard of it, and (2)can it be accessed in China ? >
                    >

                    Oh great! We can get access to it in China. I am even able to create my own conversation show. So are my students. thx for sharing.

                    wan zhang jie
                  • sheila swanson
                    Wan Zhang Zie expressed interest in trying to participate in an online talk radio program, blogtalkradio. Sure! I thought I might try it too! Sheila Swanson
                    Message 9 of 10 , Aug 19, 2013
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                      Wan Zhang Zie expressed interest in trying to participate in an online talk radio program, blogtalkradio. Sure! I thought I might try it too!

                      Sheila Swanson
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