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Re: (teach) How To Teach Cake

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  • nate jarvis
    Dave offers an extended analogy to cake, that could probably work with any multistep recipe in which the component ingredients are, raw and by themselves,
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 18, 2013
      Dave offers an extended analogy to cake, that could probably work with any
      multistep recipe in which the component ingredients are, raw and by
      themselves, unpalatable.

      But with any ingredients you need to know how to select them, different
      types of potatoes for different uses*, for instance, or knowing when an
      ingredient is off, or knowing when an ingredient being off is preferable
      (stale bread for panzanella, or overripe bananas for banana muffins, etc.).
      Anyone who's ever reached for sugar and grabbed salt knows tasting your
      ingredients, even when they don't taste good, can be a good idea.


      *Types of potatoes with their preferred uses:
      http://www.potatogoodness.com/all-about-potatoes/potato-types/

      So much is analogy it's hard to disagree with in a way that might prove
      fruitful. I think most of us on list are in agreement that you can't learn
      to swim without getting in the water (the usual analogy), so are you
      arguing against module-based instruction of skills? Of over-reliance on
      module-based instruction of skills and/or knowledge sets? Of the module
      being too small or specific or focused?

      Nate.


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    • Jada Rufo
      Dave Kees wrote: Imagine I was going to teach cake . What are the ingredients? flour, sugar, butter, baking powder, raw eggs, milk, chocolate. ... My students
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 20, 2013
        Dave Kees wrote:

        Imagine I was going to teach "cake". What are the ingredients? flour,
        sugar, butter, baking powder, raw eggs, milk, chocolate.
        >
        >
        My students always got the meanings of the words "knowledge" and "wisdom"
        confused. They thought they could use the words interchangeably. I told
        them there is a slight difference. You know (emphasize "know") that a
        cake needs flour, sugar, butter, baking soda and eggs. You know how much
        of each ingredient is needed. You even know the process and how to mix the
        ingredients together. But just knowing these things isn't going to get you
        a cake. You need experience. And by mixing the ingredients and baking
        them yourself over and over and over you finally gain wisdom on how to bake
        a cake.

        Jada
      • Marta Holadek
        I know how to bake a cake quite well from experience, but it s possible to bake just as good a cake as I do, even the first time, simply with the knowledge of
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 21, 2013
          I know how to bake a cake quite well from experience, but it's possible to bake just as good a cake as I do, even the first time, simply with the knowledge of how to follow the directions.  So I don't think this is a good example for the difference between knowledge and wisdom.

          How about this for a better example?  You may have a lot of knowledge about raising children, but it takes wisdom to know when to keep your mouth shut.


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