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Re: (teach) Teaching English /r/ and /l/ to EFL learners: a lexical approach

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  • Nelson Bank
      That makes it a little easier to teach, and to distinguish it from the other liquid, the /l/.  There s
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 19, 2011
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      <the Japanese sound has been described as an /r/>
       
      That makes it a little easier to teach, and to distinguish it from the other liquid, the /l/.  There's not much consciousness among Chinese learners, and maybe not among native English teachers, at least American, that the 'r' sound in 'two' in Mandarin (er), is indistinct from the American English 'r' sound.  But it is!
      Teacher:  Say 'er' in Mandarin
      Student:  Er.
      Teacher:  Now with the same sound, say 'Arby's Roast Beef'.
      Student:  Arby's Roast Beef.  Sir?
      Teacher:  Yes?
      Student:  What is 'Arby's Roast Beef'?
       
      Nelson Bank

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • sheila swanson
      On Sun, 6/19/11, Nelson Bank wrote: That makes it a little easier to teach, and to distinguish it from the other liquid, the /l/. There s
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 28, 2011
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        On Sun, 6/19/11, Nelson Bank <natlunla@...> wrote:

        That makes it a little easier to teach, and to distinguish it from the other liquid, the /l/. There's not much consciousness among Chinese learners, and maybe not among native English teachers, at least American, that the 'r' sound in 'two' in Mandarin (er), is indistinct from the American English 'r' sound. But it is!

        Teacher: Say 'er' in Mandarin

        Student: Er.

        Teacher: Now with the same sound, say 'Arby's Roast Beef'.

        Student: Arby's Roast Beef. Sir?

        Teacher: Yes?

        Student: What is 'Arby's Roast Beef'?
        >
        >
        Touch!
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