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Re: (teach) proficiency versus achievement testing

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  • fshdt
    One problem with testing only what has been taught is that the learner with a higher vocabulary and a higher level of English can use what has been taught in a
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 31, 2006
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      One problem with testing only what has been taught is that the learner
      with a higher vocabulary and a higher level of English can use what
      has been taught in a far more effective way than the weaker student.
      The higher level student can can, with their wider vocabulary,
      integrate the taught items and comment on them, bringing in a wider
      world and dealing with the topic in a far more sophisticated manner.

      Both students have learned exactly the same material from the course.
      Which gets the higher mark?

      Dick Tibbetts
    • foreigner@asia.com
      ... Yes. ... This is why single assessments conducted at, or close to, the end of some course are not as effective for validating individual student
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 1, 2006
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        > From: fshdt <tibbetts@...>
        > learner
        > with a higher vocabulary and a higher level of English can use what
        > has been taught in a far more effective way than the weaker student.

        Yes.

        > From: fshdt <tibbetts@...>
        > Both students have learned exactly the same material from the course.
        > Which gets the higher mark?

        This is why single assessments conducted at, or close to, the end of some
        course are not as effective for validating individual student performance.

        The only way around this as far as I know is to evaluate performance in
        an on-going manner, pre-testing to set the baseline; ongoing testing to
        monitor learning advances or difficulties; and post-testing to measure the
        degree of improvement above the initial baseline. Assessment feedback then
        should be more closely related to actual individual performance.

        Having said that, most schools prefer a graded mark, either as a number or
        letter. As such, assessment tools need to integrate the perfomance criteria
        and the key indicators with some form of scoring system.

        "Who gets the higher mark?" In end effect the person who demonstrates the
        most consistant improvement throughout the program should get the higher mark.

        Some higher level ability students tend to slacken in their application to
        their studies, especially if they feel that it is easy for them. Unfortunately,
        unless a lesser student makes stunning advancement (I have seen this happen)
        the more linguistically skilled student will always draw the higher mark,
        especially if they happen to be the 'star pupil' of the school.

        --
        ___________________________________________________
        Tsc Tempest DCA
      • dk
        Tsc Tempest wrote: The only way around this as far as I know is to evaluate performance in an on-going manner, pre-testing to set the baseline; ongoing
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 1, 2006
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          Tsc Tempest wrote: "The only way around this as far as I know is to
          evaluate performance in an on-going manner, pre-testing to set the
          baseline; ongoing testing to monitor learning advances or difficulties;
          and post-testing to measure the degree of improvement above the initial
          baseline. Assessment feedback then should be more closely related to
          actual individual performance."


          What test did you use? What was the degree of change from the beginning
          to the end of the course?


          Dave Kees

          ===========================================================
          davekees@... - Guangzhou, China - skype: davekees
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