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Culture and initial teacher training

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  • darren
    Searching the Cambridge CELTA syllabus for `culture , I discover the following. Unit 1 – Learners and teachers and the teaching and learning context 1.1
    Message 1 of 19 , Feb 3, 2011
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      Searching the Cambridge CELTA syllabus for `culture', I discover the following.

      Unit 1 – Learners and teachers and the teaching and learning context

      1.1 Cultural, linguistic and educational backgrounds

      Demonstrate an understanding of the range of backgrounds and experiences that adult learners bring to their classes

      A quick scoot around the Trinity CertTESOL site yields similar results….

      Learning objectives

      Successful trainees will be able to demonstrate the following on completion of the course:

      b. awareness of the learning needs of individuals or groups of learners, and of the motivation of learners in a variety of cultures and environments

      These two organisations are the prominent international providers of entry level TEFL qualifications, and many of the trainees on these courses will go on to their first teaching jobs after receiving their certificates. A fairly large number, I would predict, would be NEST's , and a lot of them would be going on to their first extended forays into foreign cultures.

      I am at the preliminary stages of work on a paper at the moment, and I wonder if I could draw on the expertise of teacher trainers and trainees out there. Some questions, to help me get a feel for the topic.

      If you train NESTs on either the Cambridge or Trinity certificate, how do you interpret the excerpts reproduced above? What kind of input sessions do you give on `culture', and how do you assess whether trainees have gained cultural understanding?
      It would appear, from the syllabi, that cross-cultural training focuses on what happens in the classroom. How well are trainees prepared for life / work abroad? (Or is that beyond the remit of a four-week course)?
      If you are a NEST who has taken an initial training course before travelling to a teaching job abroad, did you feel sufficiently well prepared?
      These questions are very broad but any feedback is welcome. I have posted this request at http://www.livesofteachers.com/2011/02/04/intercultural-training-for-pre-service-teachers-a-favour/ , where you may also respond. If you would like to answer but would rather not respond in a public forum, please feel free to contact me directly at darrenrelliott@...
      Any response will be confidential and identities will be protected. If you want to forward this to colleagues who are not active online, please do so.

      Thanks in advance and your help is much appreciated!

      Darren Elliott
      Japan
    • Mark Bain
      Hi Darren Would you mind if I republished your message on the official TDSIG blog? We can also spread the word via our Facebook page and Twitter feed. Regards
      Message 2 of 19 , Feb 4, 2011
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        Hi Darren

        Would you mind if I republished your message on the official TDSIG blog? We can also spread the word via our Facebook page and Twitter feed.

        Regards

        On 4 February 2011 05:39, darren <darrenrelliott@...> wrote:
         

        Searching the Cambridge CELTA syllabus for `culture', I discover the following.

        Unit 1 – Learners and teachers and the teaching and learning context

        1.1 Cultural, linguistic and educational backgrounds

        Demonstrate an understanding of the range of backgrounds and experiences that adult learners bring to their classes

        A quick scoot around the Trinity CertTESOL site yields similar results….

        Learning objectives

        Successful trainees will be able to demonstrate the following on completion of the course:

        b. awareness of the learning needs of individuals or groups of learners, and of the motivation of learners in a variety of cultures and environments

        These two organisations are the prominent international providers of entry level TEFL qualifications, and many of the trainees on these courses will go on to their first teaching jobs after receiving their certificates. A fairly large number, I would predict, would be NEST's , and a lot of them would be going on to their first extended forays into foreign cultures.

        I am at the preliminary stages of work on a paper at the moment, and I wonder if I could draw on the expertise of teacher trainers and trainees out there. Some questions, to help me get a feel for the topic.

        If you train NESTs on either the Cambridge or Trinity certificate, how do you interpret the excerpts reproduced above? What kind of input sessions do you give on `culture', and how do you assess whether trainees have gained cultural understanding?
        It would appear, from the syllabi, that cross-cultural training focuses on what happens in the classroom. How well are trainees prepared for life / work abroad? (Or is that beyond the remit of a four-week course)?
        If you are a NEST who has taken an initial training course before travelling to a teaching job abroad, did you feel sufficiently well prepared?
        These questions are very broad but any feedback is welcome. I have posted this request at http://www.livesofteachers.com/2011/02/04/intercultural-training-for-pre-service-teachers-a-favour/ , where you may also respond. If you would like to answer but would rather not respond in a public forum, please feel free to contact me directly at darrenrelliott@...
        Any response will be confidential and identities will be protected. If you want to forward this to colleagues who are not active online, please do so.

        Thanks in advance and your help is much appreciated!

        Darren Elliott
        Japan




        --
        Mark Crawford Bain



      • Pauline Johnson
        Dear Darren, Thinking back to the dim and distant past when I did the RSA Diploma in TEFLA, our trainer always talked of our students knowledge of the world
        Message 3 of 19 , Feb 4, 2011
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          Dear Darren,

          Thinking back to the dim and distant past when I did the RSA Diploma in TEFLA, our trainer always talked of our students' "knowledge of the world" and it was quite clear that he meant what previously acquired knowledge they brought with them to the English Language classroom or environment.

          So that is how I would interpret your question. I am afraid that I have no idea what you mean by NESTs and I imagine that most of the people in this TDSIG group would be likely to laugh at me for not knowing this information. Perhaps you might be so kind as to let me know.

          The last time that I dared to express my opinion on this website, I was told that I was no good because I had done my MA 17 years ago and that I should be more up to date. I'd love to be allowed to have further time off to do a PhD, but I only get 6 weeks' leave a year, so that will never be possible.

          Best wishes,

          Pauline 

          From: darren <darrenrelliott@...>
          To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Fri, 4 February, 2011 5:39:55
          Subject: [TDSIG] Culture and initial teacher training

           

          Searching the Cambridge CELTA syllabus for `culture', I discover the following.

          Unit 1 – Learners and teachers and the teaching and learning context

          1.1 Cultural, linguistic and educational backgrounds

          Demonstrate an understanding of the range of backgrounds and experiences that adult learners bring to their classes

          A quick scoot around the Trinity CertTESOL site yields similar results….

          Learning objectives

          Successful trainees will be able to demonstrate the following on completion of the course:

          b. awareness of the learning needs of individuals or groups of learners, and of the motivation of learners in a variety of cultures and environments

          These two organisations are the prominent international providers of entry level TEFL qualifications, and many of the trainees on these courses will go on to their first teaching jobs after receiving their certificates. A fairly large number, I would predict, would be NEST's , and a lot of them would be going on to their first extended forays into foreign cultures.

          I am at the preliminary stages of work on a paper at the moment, and I wonder if I could draw on the expertise of teacher trainers and trainees out there. Some questions, to help me get a feel for the topic.

          If you train NESTs on either the Cambridge or Trinity certificate, how do you interpret the excerpts reproduced above? What kind of input sessions do you give on `culture', and how do you assess whether trainees have gained cultural understanding?
          It would appear, from the syllabi, that cross-cultural training focuses on what happens in the classroom. How well are trainees prepared for life / work abroad? (Or is that beyond the remit of a four-week course)?
          If you are a NEST who has taken an initial training course before travelling to a teaching job abroad, did you feel sufficiently well prepared?
          These questions are very broad but any feedback is welcome. I have posted this request at http://www.livesofteachers.com/2011/02/04/intercultural-training-for-pre-service-teachers-a-favour/ , where you may also respond. If you would like to answer but would rather not respond in a public forum, please feel free to contact me directly at darrenrelliott@...
          Any response will be confidential and identities will be protected. If you want to forward this to colleagues who are not active online, please do so.

          Thanks in advance and your help is much appreciated!

          Darren Elliott
          Japan


        • Pauline Johnson
          Dear Mark, I m utterly amazed to see that members of this group are discussing an official TDSIG blog, plus a Facebook page and a Twitter feed. Why have I
          Message 4 of 19 , Feb 4, 2011
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            Dear Mark,

            I'm utterly amazed to see that members of this group are discussing an official TDSIG blog, plus a Facebook page and a Twitter feed. Why have I never been told about it?? Is it only for members who are rich enough to be able to afford a flight and stay in an expensive hotel at the annual IATEFL conferences in the UK? It has become increasingly difficult for me to attend these expensive conferences, much that I would like to, because they a) are always so expensive and b) always take place in the middle of my university semester. Whereas in the past they would take place during the Easter break.

            Best wishes,

            Pauline Johnson

             


            From: Mark Bain <markcbain@...>
            To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Fri, 4 February, 2011 16:12:29
            Subject: Re: [TDSIG] Culture and initial teacher training

             

            Hi Darren

            Would you mind if I republished your message on the official TDSIG blog? We can also spread the word via our Facebook page and Twitter feed.

            Regards

            On 4 February 2011 05:39, darren <darrenrelliott@...> wrote:
             

            Searching the Cambridge CELTA syllabus for `culture', I discover the following.

            Unit 1 – Learners and teachers and the teaching and learning context

            1.1 Cultural, linguistic and educational backgrounds

            Demonstrate an understanding of the range of backgrounds and experiences that adult learners bring to their classes

            A quick scoot around the Trinity CertTESOL site yields similar results….

            Learning objectives

            Successful trainees will be able to demonstrate the following on completion of the course:

            b. awareness of the learning needs of individuals or groups of learners, and of the motivation of learners in a variety of cultures and environments

            These two organisations are the prominent international providers of entry level TEFL qualifications, and many of the trainees on these courses will go on to their first teaching jobs after receiving their certificates. A fairly large number, I would predict, would be NEST's , and a lot of them would be going on to their first extended forays into foreign cultures.

            I am at the preliminary stages of work on a paper at the moment, and I wonder if I could draw on the expertise of teacher trainers and trainees out there. Some questions, to help me get a feel for the topic.

            If you train NESTs on either the Cambridge or Trinity certificate, how do you interpret the excerpts reproduced above? What kind of input sessions do you give on `culture', and how do you assess whether trainees have gained cultural understanding?
            It would appear, from the syllabi, that cross-cultural training focuses on what happens in the classroom. How well are trainees prepared for life / work abroad? (Or is that beyond the remit of a four-week course)?
            If you are a NEST who has taken an initial training course before travelling to a teaching job abroad, did you feel sufficiently well prepared?
            These questions are very broad but any feedback is welcome. I have posted this request at http://www.livesofteachers.com/2011/02/04/intercultural-training-for-pre-service-teachers-a-favour/ , where you may also respond. If you would like to answer but would rather not respond in a public forum, please feel free to contact me directly at darrenrelliott@...
            Any response will be confidential and identities will be protected. If you want to forward this to colleagues who are not active online, please do so.

            Thanks in advance and your help is much appreciated!

            Darren Elliott
            Japan




            --
            Mark Crawford Bain




          • Mark Bain
            The blog, Facebook page and Twitter are free and open to all - you don t even have to be a member of the SIG or IATEFL for that matter. Here are the links:
            Message 5 of 19 , Feb 4, 2011
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              The blog, Facebook page and Twitter are free and open to all - you don't even have to be a member of the SIG or IATEFL  for that matter.
              Here are the links:
              TDSIG blog/website
              Facebook page
              Twitter
              Let your colleagues and friends know. The more the merrier.
              Cheers
              --
              Mark Crawford Bain





              On 4 February 2011 19:08, Pauline Johnson <paunjohnson@...> wrote:
               

              Dear Mark,

              I'm utterly amazed to see that members of this group are discussing an official TDSIG blog, plus a Facebook page and a Twitter feed. Why have I never been told about it?? Is it only for members who are rich enough to be able to afford a flight and stay in an expensive hotel at the annual IATEFL conferences in the UK? It has become increasingly difficult for me to attend these expensive conferences, much that I would like to, because they a) are always so expensive and b) always take place in the middle of my university semester. Whereas in the past they would take place during the Easter break.

              Best wishes,

              Pauline Johnson

               


              From: Mark Bain <markcbain@...>
              To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Fri, 4 February, 2011 16:12:29
              Subject: Re: [TDSIG] Culture and initial teacher training

               

              Hi Darren

              Would you mind if I republished your message on the official TDSIG blog? We can also spread the word via our Facebook page and Twitter feed.

              Regards

              On 4 February 2011 05:39, darren <darrenrelliott@...> wrote:
               

              Searching the Cambridge CELTA syllabus for `culture', I discover the following.

              Unit 1 – Learners and teachers and the teaching and learning context

              1.1 Cultural, linguistic and educational backgrounds

              Demonstrate an understanding of the range of backgrounds and experiences that adult learners bring to their classes

              A quick scoot around the Trinity CertTESOL site yields similar results….

              Learning objectives

              Successful trainees will be able to demonstrate the following on completion of the course:

              b. awareness of the learning needs of individuals or groups of learners, and of the motivation of learners in a variety of cultures and environments

              These two organisations are the prominent international providers of entry level TEFL qualifications, and many of the trainees on these courses will go on to their first teaching jobs after receiving their certificates. A fairly large number, I would predict, would be NEST's , and a lot of them would be going on to their first extended forays into foreign cultures.

              I am at the preliminary stages of work on a paper at the moment, and I wonder if I could draw on the expertise of teacher trainers and trainees out there. Some questions, to help me get a feel for the topic.

              If you train NESTs on either the Cambridge or Trinity certificate, how do you interpret the excerpts reproduced above? What kind of input sessions do you give on `culture', and how do you assess whether trainees have gained cultural understanding?
              It would appear, from the syllabi, that cross-cultural training focuses on what happens in the classroom. How well are trainees prepared for life / work abroad? (Or is that beyond the remit of a four-week course)?
              If you are a NEST who has taken an initial training course before travelling to a teaching job abroad, did you feel sufficiently well prepared?
              These questions are very broad but any feedback is welcome. I have posted this request at http://www.livesofteachers.com/2011/02/04/intercultural-training-for-pre-service-teachers-a-favour/ , where you may also respond. If you would like to answer but would rather not respond in a public forum, please feel free to contact me directly at darrenrelliott@...
              Any response will be confidential and identities will be protected. If you want to forward this to colleagues who are not active online, please do so.

              Thanks in advance and your help is much appreciated!

              Darren Elliott
              Japan




              --
              Mark Crawford Bain







              --
              Mark Crawford Bain



            • Adrian Tennant
              Pauline, NEST (Native English Speaking Teacher) as opposed to NNEST (non- native). Acronyms used by Medgyes Peter in a book he wrote back in the early 1990s.
              Message 6 of 19 , Feb 4, 2011
              • 0 Attachment

                Pauline,

                NEST (Native English Speaking Teacher) as opposed to NNEST (non- native). Acronyms used by Medgyes Peter in a book he wrote back in the early 1990s.

                As for what you wrote re: no good. I'd hope that nobody in the TD group would be so clueless as to think that an MA was the only form of TD. When you did yours doesn't matter as long as you've found other ways of keeping yourself updated. Conferences, of course are a good way as is reading books, articles, journals, belonging to groups such as this etc.

                As for the IATEFL Conference. It's actually not gone up by the rate of inflation over the past ten years or so. Sure, it's still quite expensive, but then the biggest costs are things like travel, accommodation etc and IATEFL does try to get discounted rates at hotels for delegates. As for timing - one reason that it's not always in Easter is that it's quite often more expensive to hire venues in those two weeks (which would then push up the costs even more!) This year it's right at the start of Easter. However, the online conference was started with the very idea of reaching out to people who can't afford / get to the physical conference. Have you tried it?

                Adrian



                On 4 Feb 2011, at 17:58, Pauline Johnson wrote:


                Dear Darren,

                Thinking back to the dim and distant past when I did the RSA Diploma in TEFLA, our trainer always talked of our students' "knowledge of the world" and it was quite clear that he meant what previously acquired knowledge they brought with them to the English Language classroom or environment.

                So that is how I would interpret your question. I am afraid that I have no idea what you mean by NESTs and I imagine that most of the people in this TDSIG group would be likely to laugh at me for not knowing this information. Perhaps you might be so kind as to let me know.

                The last time that I dared to express my opinion on this website, I was told that I was no good because I had done my MA 17 years ago and that I should be more up to date. I'd love to be allowed to have further time off to do a PhD, but I only get 6 weeks' leave a year, so that will never be possible.

                Best wishes,

                Pauline 

                From: darren <darrenrelliott@...>
                To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Fri, 4 February, 2011 5:39:55
                Subject: [TDSIG] Culture and initial teacher training

                 

                Searching the Cambridge CELTA syllabus for `culture', I discover the following.

                Unit 1 – Learners and teachers and the teaching and learning context

                1.1 Cultural, linguistic and educational backgrounds

                Demonstrate an understanding of the range of backgrounds and experiences that adult learners bring to their classes

                A quick scoot around the Trinity CertTESOL site yields similar results….

                Learning objectives

                Successful trainees will be able to demonstrate the following on completion of the course:

                b. awareness of the learning needs of individuals or groups of learners, and of the motivation of learners in a variety of cultures and environments

                These two organisations are the prominent international providers of entry level TEFL qualifications, and many of the trainees on these courses will go on to their first teaching jobs after receiving their certificates. A fairly large number, I would predict, would be NEST's , and a lot of them would be going on to their first extended forays into foreign cultures.

                I am at the preliminary stages of work on a paper at the moment, and I wonder if I could draw on the expertise of teacher trainers and trainees out there. Some questions, to help me get a feel for the topic.

                If you train NESTs on either the Cambridge or Trinity certificate, how do you interpret the excerpts reproduced above? What kind of input sessions do you give on `culture', and how do you assess whether trainees have gained cultural understanding?
                It would appear, from the syllabi, that cross-cultural training focuses on what happens in the classroom. How well are trainees prepared for life / work abroad? (Or is that beyond the remit of a four-week course)?
                If you are a NEST who has taken an initial training course before travelling to a teaching job abroad, did you feel sufficiently well prepared?
                These questions are very broad but any feedback is welcome. I have posted this request athttp://www.livesofteachers.com/2011/02/04/intercultural-training-for-pre-service-teachers-a-favour/ , where you may also respond. If you would like to answer but would rather not respond in a public forum, please feel free to contact me directly at darrenrelliott@...
                Any response will be confidential and identities will be protected. If you want to forward this to colleagues who are not active online, please do so.

                Thanks in advance and your help is much appreciated! 

                Darren Elliott
                Japan




              • Karen Richardson
                Dear Pauline, Further to Adrian s comments, I d like to sympathise and offer a couple of more suggestions. Yes, you re right, the costs of attending an
                Message 7 of 19 , Feb 4, 2011
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                  Dear Pauline,
                   
                  Further to Adrian's comments, I'd like to sympathise and offer a couple of more suggestions.
                  Yes, you're right, the costs of attending an international conference are high.
                   
                  However,
                  as I believe that IATEFL is THE conference to go to I've usually found a way to subsidise the costs.
                   
                  Here are some suggestions (many of which I've tried out successfully):
                  Give a presentation and get backing for it.
                  Team up with someone who is giving a presentation and share her hotel room.
                  Ditto for someone who is getting sponsored in another way, e.g. as a member of a committee or attending on behalf of an organisation.
                  Write a report for someone who will pay you for it.
                  Become a roving reporter.
                  Become the associate memeber for your elta.
                  Join a committee (IATEFL or one of its sigs).
                  ....
                   
                  And I'm wondering whether you're a full-time lecturer (as you say you can't get time off). If this is the case, perhaps your uni would  subsidise you in return for you passing on what you learn at the conference to other lecturers when you get back?????
                   
                  Now if someone has any ideas as to how I can subsidise going to the weekend conference in Barcelona in April, please do send them to me.....
                   
                  See you in Brighton,
                  Karen
                   
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Friday, February 04, 2011 7:34 PM
                  Subject: Re: [TDSIG] Culture and initial teacher training

                   


                  Pauline,

                  NEST (Native English Speaking Teacher) as opposed to NNEST (non- native). Acronyms used by Medgyes Peter in a book he wrote back in the early 1990s.

                  As for what you wrote re: no good. I'd hope that nobody in the TD group would be so clueless as to think that an MA was the only form of TD. When you did yours doesn't matter as long as you've found other ways of keeping yourself updated. Conferences, of course are a good way as is reading books, articles, journals, belonging to groups such as this etc.

                  As for the IATEFL Conference. It's actually not gone up by the rate of inflation over the past ten years or so. Sure, it's still quite expensive, but then the biggest costs are things like travel, accommodation etc and IATEFL does try to get discounted rates at hotels for delegates. As for timing - one reason that it's not always in Easter is that it's quite often more expensive to hire venues in those two weeks (which would then push up the costs even more!) This year it's right at the start of Easter. However, the online conference was started with the very idea of reaching out to people who can't afford / get to the physical conference. Have you tried it?

                  Adrian



                  On 4 Feb 2011, at 17:58, Pauline Johnson wrote:


                  Dear Darren,

                  Thinking back to the dim and distant past when I did the RSA Diploma in TEFLA, our trainer always talked of our students' "knowledge of the world" and it was quite clear that he meant what previously acquired knowledge they brought with them to the English Language classroom or environment.

                  So that is how I would interpret your question. I am afraid that I have no idea what you mean by NESTs and I imagine that most of the people in this TDSIG group would be likely to laugh at me for not knowing this information. Perhaps you might be so kind as to let me know.

                  The last time that I dared to express my opinion on this website, I was told that I was no good because I had done my MA 17 years ago and that I should be more up to date. I'd love to be allowed to have further time off to do a PhD, but I only get 6 weeks' leave a year, so that will never be possible.

                  Best wishes,

                  Pauline 

                  From: darren <darrenrelliott@...>
                  To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Fri, 4 February, 2011 5:39:55
                  Subject: [TDSIG] Culture and initial teacher training

                   

                  Searching the Cambridge CELTA syllabus for `culture', I discover the following.

                  Unit 1 – Learners and teachers and the teaching and learning context

                  1.1 Cultural, linguistic and educational backgrounds

                  Demonstrate an understanding of the range of backgrounds and experiences that adult learners bring to their classes

                  A quick scoot around the Trinity CertTESOL site yields similar results….

                  Learning objectives

                  Successful trainees will be able to demonstrate the following on completion of the course:

                  b. awareness of the learning needs of individuals or groups of learners, and of the motivation of learners in a variety of cultures and environments

                  These two organisations are the prominent international providers of entry level TEFL qualifications, and many of the trainees on these courses will go on to their first teaching jobs after receiving their certificates. A fairly large number, I would predict, would be NEST's , and a lot of them would be going on to their first extended forays into foreign cultures.

                  I am at the preliminary stages of work on a paper at the moment, and I wonder if I could draw on the expertise of teacher trainers and trainees out there. Some questions, to help me get a feel for the topic.

                  If you train NESTs on either the Cambridge or Trinity certificate, how do you interpret the excerpts reproduced above? What kind of input sessions do you give on `culture', and how do you assess whether trainees have gained cultural understanding?
                  It would appear, from the syllabi, that cross-cultural training focuses on what happens in the classroom. How well are trainees prepared for life / work abroad? (Or is that beyond the remit of a four-week course)?
                  If you are a NEST who has taken an initial training course before travelling to a teaching job abroad, did you feel sufficiently well prepared?
                  These questions are very broad but any feedback is welcome. I have posted this request athttp://www.livesofteachers.com/2011/02/04/intercultural-training-for-pre-service-teachers-a-favour/ , where you may also respond. If you would like to answer but would rather not respond in a public forum, please feel free to contact me directly at darrenrelliott@...
                  Any response will be confidential and identities will be protected. If you want to forward this to colleagues who are not active online, please do so.

                  Thanks in advance and your help is much appreciated! 

                  Darren Elliott
                  Japan




                • Pauline Johnson
                  Dear Adrian, Thank you for your explanation of the acronym NEST - in my days it was native speaker versus non-native speaker. I m not lying when I say that
                  Message 8 of 19 , Feb 4, 2011
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Dear Adrian,

                    Thank you for your explanation of the acronym NEST - in my days it was native speaker versus non-native speaker.

                    I'm not lying when I say that somebody in your group said that I was no good. I didn't keep a copy of the e-mail because I was so mortified and ashamed, but a man in the group wrote to me with words to the effect that if a doctor or surgeon had qualified 17 years ago, he would be considered to be no good at performing an operation, hence I was no good as a teacher.

                    I remember that I was devastated because I could a) not afford the money or b) the time to do a PhD at that moment in time.

                    As far as the conferences are concerned, of course I am aware that you do your best to keep them as cheap as possible. But I still have to pay for a return flight to the UK and beg for time off work during semester time (which is mostly refused), then I have to pay for a hired car to get me to the conference venue and back and for parking the car whilst I am at the venue, and, most expensive of all, I have to pay for accommodation at a hotel in Brighton (for example). The last time I stayed in Brighton, there was mould on the wall of the shower, no hot water in the shower, no telephone in the hotel,  the handbasin was blocked and it was impossible to open the window. The manager of the hotel was really unfriendly and expected me to pay for all incoming calls. Can you imagine it? - That was a hotel that had been recommended by IATEFL!!

                    As for your question about the online conferences, I have tried, but I've never been able to get through to them or receive them. I do have a new computer right now. Does that mean I might be able to receive it? I've never received instructions about it that I could understand ....

                    Thanking you,

                    Pauline


                    From: Adrian Tennant <adrian.tennant@...>
                    To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Fri, 4 February, 2011 19:34:38
                    Subject: Re: [TDSIG] Culture and initial teacher training

                     


                    Pauline,

                    NEST (Native English Speaking Teacher) as opposed to NNEST (non- native). Acronyms used by Medgyes Peter in a book he wrote back in the early 1990s.

                    As for what you wrote re: no good. I'd hope that nobody in the TD group would be so clueless as to think that an MA was the only form of TD. When you did yours doesn't matter as long as you've found other ways of keeping yourself updated. Conferences, of course are a good way as is reading books, articles, journals, belonging to groups such as this etc.

                    As for the IATEFL Conference. It's actually not gone up by the rate of inflation over the past ten years or so. Sure, it's still quite expensive, but then the biggest costs are things like travel, accommodation etc and IATEFL does try to get discounted rates at hotels for delegates. As for timing - one reason that it's not always in Easter is that it's quite often more expensive to hire venues in those two weeks (which would then push up the costs even more!) This year it's right at the start of Easter. However, the online conference was started with the very idea of reaching out to people who can't afford / get to the physical conference. Have you tried it?

                    Adrian



                    On 4 Feb 2011, at 17:58, Pauline Johnson wrote:


                    Dear Darren,

                    Thinking back to the dim and distant past when I did the RSA Diploma in TEFLA, our trainer always talked of our students' "knowledge of the world" and it was quite clear that he meant what previously acquired knowledge they brought with them to the English Language classroom or environment.

                    So that is how I would interpret your question. I am afraid that I have no idea what you mean by NESTs and I imagine that most of the people in this TDSIG group would be likely to laugh at me for not knowing this information. Perhaps you might be so kind as to let me know.

                    The last time that I dared to express my opinion on this website, I was told that I was no good because I had done my MA 17 years ago and that I should be more up to date. I'd love to be allowed to have further time off to do a PhD, but I only get 6 weeks' leave a year, so that will never be possible.

                    Best wishes,

                    Pauline 

                    From: darren <darrenrelliott@...>
                    To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Fri, 4 February, 2011 5:39:55
                    Subject: [TDSIG] Culture and initial teacher training

                     

                    Searching the Cambridge CELTA syllabus for `culture', I discover the following.

                    Unit 1 – Learners and teachers and the teaching and learning context

                    1.1 Cultural, linguistic and educational backgrounds

                    Demonstrate an understanding of the range of backgrounds and experiences that adult learners bring to their classes

                    A quick scoot around the Trinity CertTESOL site yields similar results….

                    Learning objectives

                    Successful trainees will be able to demonstrate the following on completion of the course:

                    b. awareness of the learning needs of individuals or groups of learners, and of the motivation of learners in a variety of cultures and environments

                    These two organisations are the prominent international providers of entry level TEFL qualifications, and many of the trainees on these courses will go on to their first teaching jobs after receiving their certificates. A fairly large number, I would predict, would be NEST's , and a lot of them would be going on to their first extended forays into foreign cultures.

                    I am at the preliminary stages of work on a paper at the moment, and I wonder if I could draw on the expertise of teacher trainers and trainees out there. Some questions, to help me get a feel for the topic.

                    If you train NESTs on either the Cambridge or Trinity certificate, how do you interpret the excerpts reproduced above? What kind of input sessions do you give on `culture', and how do you assess whether trainees have gained cultural understanding?
                    It would appear, from the syllabi, that cross-cultural training focuses on what happens in the classroom. How well are trainees prepared for life / work abroad? (Or is that beyond the remit of a four-week course)?
                    If you are a NEST who has taken an initial training course before travelling to a teaching job abroad, did you feel sufficiently well prepared?
                    These questions are very broad but any feedback is welcome. I have posted this request athttp://www.livesofteachers.com/2011/02/04/intercultural-training-for-pre-service-teachers-a-favour/ , where you may also respond. If you would like to answer but would rather not respond in a public forum, please feel free to contact me directly at darrenrelliott@...
                    Any response will be confidential and identities will be protected. If you want to forward this to colleagues who are not active online, please do so.

                    Thanks in advance and your help is much appreciated! 

                    Darren Elliott
                    Japan





                  • Pauline Johnson
                    Dear Karen, I am so grateful for your sympathy. I absolutely love coming to the IATEFL conference and believe, like yourself, that it is THE conference to
                    Message 9 of 19 , Feb 4, 2011
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Dear Karen,

                      I am so grateful for your sympathy. I absolutely  love coming to the IATEFL conference and believe, like yourself, that it is THE conference to come to, but I can't always afford it!! 

                      I've always wanted to give a presentation, but have so far only dared to give one at ETAI in Israel. I didn't get backing for it and have no idea how I met get backing for a presentation. Yes, I agree with you that sharing a room with someone would halve the costs, but I don't know anyone i might share a room with!!

                      How could I write a report for someone who would pay me for it, or become a roving reporter, or become an associate memeber for my elta. Sorry, but what is an elta? I have tried in the past to join the TDSIG committee to no avail. I'm obviously in the wrong SIG!!

                      Best wishes,

                      Pauline


                      From: Karen Richardson <karen.richardson@...>
                      To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Fri, 4 February, 2011 19:51:55
                      Subject: Re: [TDSIG] Culture and initial teacher training

                       

                      Dear Pauline,
                       
                      Further to Adrian's comments, I'd like to sympathise and offer a couple of more suggestions.
                      Yes, you're right, the costs of attending an international conference are high.
                       
                      However,
                      as I believe that IATEFL is THE conference to go to I've usually found a way to subsidise the costs.
                       
                      Here are some suggestions (many of which I've tried out successfully):
                      Give a presentation and get backing for it.
                      Team up with someone who is giving a presentation and share her hotel room.
                      Ditto for someone who is getting sponsored in another way, e.g. as a member of a committee or attending on behalf of an organisation.
                      c
                      ....
                       
                      And I'm wondering whether you're a full-time lecturer (as you say you can't get time off). If this is the case, perhaps your uni would  subsidise you in return for you passing on what you learn at the conference to other lecturers when you get back?????
                       
                      Now if someone has any ideas as to how I can subsidise going to the weekend conference in Barcelona in April, please do send them to me.....
                       
                      See you in Brighton,
                      Karen
                       
                       
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: Friday, February 04, 2011 7:34 PM
                      Subject: Re: [TDSIG] Culture and initial teacher training

                       


                      Pauline,

                      NEST (Native English Speaking Teacher) as opposed to NNEST (non- native). Acronyms used by Medgyes Peter in a book he wrote back in the early 1990s.

                      As for what you wrote re: no good. I'd hope that nobody in the TD group would be so clueless as to think that an MA was the only form of TD. When you did yours doesn't matter as long as you've found other ways of keeping yourself updated. Conferences, of course are a good way as is reading books, articles, journals, belonging to groups such as this etc.

                      As for the IATEFL Conference. It's actually not gone up by the rate of inflation over the past ten years or so. Sure, it's still quite expensive, but then the biggest costs are things like travel, accommodation etc and IATEFL does try to get discounted rates at hotels for delegates. As for timing - one reason that it's not always in Easter is that it's quite often more expensive to hire venues in those two weeks (which would then push up the costs even more!) This year it's right at the start of Easter. However, the online conference was started with the very idea of reaching out to people who can't afford / get to the physical conference. Have you tried it?

                      Adrian



                      On 4 Feb 2011, at 17:58, Pauline Johnson wrote:


                      Dear Darren,

                      Thinking back to the dim and distant past when I did the RSA Diploma in TEFLA, our trainer always talked of our students' "knowledge of the world" and it was quite clear that he meant what previously acquired knowledge they brought with them to the English Language classroom or environment.

                      So that is how I would interpret your question. I am afraid that I have no idea what you mean by NESTs and I imagine that most of the people in this TDSIG group would be likely to laugh at me for not knowing this information. Perhaps you might be so kind as to let me know.

                      The last time that I dared to express my opinion on this website, I was told that I was no good because I had done my MA 17 years ago and that I should be more up to date. I'd love to be allowed to have further time off to do a PhD, but I only get 6 weeks' leave a year, so that will never be possible.

                      Best wishes,

                      Pauline 

                      From: darren <darrenrelliott@...>
                      To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Fri, 4 February, 2011 5:39:55
                      Subject: [TDSIG] Culture and initial teacher training

                       

                      Searching the Cambridge CELTA syllabus for `culture', I discover the following.

                      Unit 1 – Learners and teachers and the teaching and learning context

                      1.1 Cultural, linguistic and educational backgrounds

                      Demonstrate an understanding of the range of backgrounds and experiences that adult learners bring to their classes

                      A quick scoot around the Trinity CertTESOL site yields similar results….

                      Learning objectives

                      Successful trainees will be able to demonstrate the following on completion of the course:

                      b. awareness of the learning needs of individuals or groups of learners, and of the motivation of learners in a variety of cultures and environments

                      These two organisations are the prominent international providers of entry level TEFL qualifications, and many of the trainees on these courses will go on to their first teaching jobs after receiving their certificates. A fairly large number, I would predict, would be NEST's , and a lot of them would be going on to their first extended forays into foreign cultures.

                      I am at the preliminary stages of work on a paper at the moment, and I wonder if I could draw on the expertise of teacher trainers and trainees out there. Some questions, to help me get a feel for the topic.

                      If you train NESTs on either the Cambridge or Trinity certificate, how do you interpret the excerpts reproduced above? What kind of input sessions do you give on `culture', and how do you assess whether trainees have gained cultural understanding?
                      It would appear, from the syllabi, that cross-cultural training focuses on what happens in the classroom. How well are trainees prepared for life / work abroad? (Or is that beyond the remit of a four-week course)?
                      If you are a NEST who has taken an initial training course before travelling to a teaching job abroad, did you feel sufficiently well prepared?
                      These questions are very broad but any feedback is welcome. I have posted this request athttp://www.livesofteachers.com/2011/02/04/intercultural-training-for-pre-service-teachers-a-favour/ , where you may also respond. If you would like to answer but would rather not respond in a public forum, please feel free to contact me directly at darrenrelliott@...
                      Any response will be confidential and identities will be protected. If you want to forward this to colleagues who are not active online, please do so.

                      Thanks in advance and your help is much appreciated! 

                      Darren Elliott
                      Japan





                    • Adrian Tennant
                      Hi Pauline, Certainly, if I went to see my doctor and they told me the last training they d done was 17 years ago and they didn t feel that it was necessary to
                      Message 10 of 19 , Feb 4, 2011
                      • 0 Attachment

                        Hi Pauline,

                        Certainly, if I went to see my doctor and they told me the last training they'd done was 17 years ago and they didn't feel that it was necessary to update their knowledge I'd be worried. And, I've certainly had one or two colleagues like this. However, updating your knowledge doesn't mean taking courses that end in a formal qualification. Updating your knowledge can involve many things, including participating in discussion groups. It's when people do nothing and say they don't need to that I'd get worried.

                        As for the online conference. Check out the IATEFL home website www.iatefl.org and follow the link with info. Brighton Online isn't online yet, but it won't be too long. Last year around 60 teachers in the Democratic Republic of Congo participated in the online conference from three internet cafes in Kinshasa. So, I'm fairly sure where you are it should be possible.

                        Hope this helps
                        Adrian



                        On 4 Feb 2011, at 19:10, Pauline Johnson wrote:


                        Dear Adrian,

                        Thank you for your explanation of the acronym NEST - in my days it was native speaker versus non-native speaker.

                        I'm not lying when I say that somebody in your group said that I was no good. I didn't keep a copy of the e-mail because I was so mortified and ashamed, but a man in the group wrote to me with words to the effect that if a doctor or surgeon had qualified 17 years ago, he would be considered to be no good at performing an operation, hence I was no good as a teacher.

                        I remember that I was devastated because I could a) not afford the money or b) the time to do a PhD at that moment in time.

                        As far as the conferences are concerned, of course I am aware that you do your best to keep them as cheap as possible. But I still have to pay for a return flight to the UK and beg for time off work during semester time (which is mostly refused), then I have to pay for a hired car to get me to the conference venue and back and for parking the car whilst I am at the venue, and, most expensive of all, I have to pay for accommodation at a hotel in Brighton (for example). The last time I stayed in Brighton, there was mould on the wall of the shower, no hot water in the shower, no telephone in the hotel,  the handbasin was blocked and it was impossible to open the window. The manager of the hotel was really unfriendly and expected me to pay for all incoming calls. Can you imagine it? - That was a hotel that had been recommended by IATEFL!!

                        As for your question about the online conferences, I have tried, but I've never been able to get through to them or receive them. I do have a new computer right now. Does that mean I might be able to receive it? I've never received instructions about it that I could understand ....

                        Thanking you,

                        Pauline


                        From: Adrian Tennant <adrian.tennant@...>
                        To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Fri, 4 February, 2011 19:34:38
                        Subject: Re: [TDSIG] Culture and initial teacher training

                         


                        Pauline,

                        NEST (Native English Speaking Teacher) as opposed to NNEST (non- native). Acronyms used by Medgyes Peter in a book he wrote back in the early 1990s.

                        As for what you wrote re: no good. I'd hope that nobody in the TD group would be so clueless as to think that an MA was the only form of TD. When you did yours doesn't matter as long as you've found other ways of keeping yourself updated. Conferences, of course are a good way as is reading books, articles, journals, belonging to groups such as this etc.

                        As for the IATEFL Conference. It's actually not gone up by the rate of inflation over the past ten years or so. Sure, it's still quite expensive, but then the biggest costs are things like travel, accommodation etc and IATEFL does try to get discounted rates at hotels for delegates. As for timing - one reason that it's not always in Easter is that it's quite often more expensive to hire venues in those two weeks (which would then push up the costs even more!) This year it's right at the start of Easter. However, the online conference was started with the very idea of reaching out to people who can't afford / get to the physical conference. Have you tried it?

                        Adrian



                        On 4 Feb 2011, at 17:58, Pauline Johnson wrote:


                        Dear Darren,

                        Thinking back to the dim and distant past when I did the RSA Diploma in TEFLA, our trainer always talked of our students' "knowledge of the world" and it was quite clear that he meant what previously acquired knowledge they brought with them to the English Language classroom or environment.

                        So that is how I would interpret your question. I am afraid that I have no idea what you mean by NESTs and I imagine that most of the people in this TDSIG group would be likely to laugh at me for not knowing this information. Perhaps you might be so kind as to let me know.

                        The last time that I dared to express my opinion on this website, I was told that I was no good because I had done my MA 17 years ago and that I should be more up to date. I'd love to be allowed to have further time off to do a PhD, but I only get 6 weeks' leave a year, so that will never be possible.

                        Best wishes,

                        Pauline 

                        From: darren <darrenrelliott@...>
                        To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Fri, 4 February, 2011 5:39:55
                        Subject: [TDSIG] Culture and initial teacher training

                         

                        Searching the Cambridge CELTA syllabus for `culture', I discover the following.

                        Unit 1 – Learners and teachers and the teaching and learning context

                        1.1 Cultural, linguistic and educational backgrounds

                        Demonstrate an understanding of the range of backgrounds and experiences that adult learners bring to their classes

                        A quick scoot around the Trinity CertTESOL site yields similar results….

                        Learning objectives

                        Successful trainees will be able to demonstrate the following on completion of the course:

                        b. awareness of the learning needs of individuals or groups of learners, and of the motivation of learners in a variety of cultures and environments

                        These two organisations are the prominent international providers of entry level TEFL qualifications, and many of the trainees on these courses will go on to their first teaching jobs after receiving their certificates. A fairly large number, I would predict, would be NEST's , and a lot of them would be going on to their first extended forays into foreign cultures.

                        I am at the preliminary stages of work on a paper at the moment, and I wonder if I could draw on the expertise of teacher trainers and trainees out there. Some questions, to help me get a feel for the topic.

                        If you train NESTs on either the Cambridge or Trinity certificate, how do you interpret the excerpts reproduced above? What kind of input sessions do you give on `culture', and how do you assess whether trainees have gained cultural understanding?
                        It would appear, from the syllabi, that cross-cultural training focuses on what happens in the classroom. How well are trainees prepared for life / work abroad? (Or is that beyond the remit of a four-week course)?
                        If you are a NEST who has taken an initial training course before travelling to a teaching job abroad, did you feel sufficiently well prepared?
                        These questions are very broad but any feedback is welcome. I have posted this request athttp://www.livesofteachers.com/2011/02/04/intercultural-training-for-pre-service-teachers-a-favour/ , where you may also respond. If you would like to answer but would rather not respond in a public forum, please feel free to contact me directly at darrenrelliott@...
                        Any response will be confidential and identities will be protected. If you want to forward this to colleagues who are not active online, please do so.

                        Thanks in advance and your help is much appreciated! 

                        Darren Elliott
                        Japan







                      • darren
                        ... Hi Mark - Please do! I appreciate your help. Darren
                        Message 11 of 19 , Feb 4, 2011
                        • 0 Attachment
                          >
                          > Hi Darren
                          >
                          > Would you mind if I republished your message on the official TDSIG blog? We
                          > can also spread the word via our Facebook page and Twitter feed.

                          Hi Mark - Please do! I appreciate your help.

                          Darren
                        • darren
                          Searching the Cambridge CELTA syllabus for `culture , I discover the following. Unit 1 ELearners and teachers and the teaching and learning context ...
                          Message 12 of 19 , Feb 6, 2011
                          • 0 Attachment

                            Searching the Cambridge CELTA syllabus for `culture', I discover the following.

                            Unit 1 ELearners and teachers and the teaching and learning context

                            >
                            > 1.1 Cultural, linguistic and educational backgrounds
                            Demonstrate an understanding of the range of backgrounds and experiences that adult learners bring to their classes 

                            A quick scoot around the Trinity CertTESOL site yields similar resultsE

                             Learning objectives
                            Successful trainees will be able to demonstrate the following on completion of the course:
                            b. awareness of the learning needs of individuals or groups of learners, and of the motivation of learners in a variety of cultures and environments
                             
                            These two organisations are the prominent international providers of entry level TEFL qualifications, and many of the trainees on these courses will go on to their first teaching jobs after receiving their certificates. A fairly large number, I would predict, would be NEST's , and a lot of them would be going on to their first extended forays into foreign cultures.
                             
                            I am at the preliminary stages of work on a paper at the moment, and I wonder if I could draw on the expertise of teacher trainers and trainees out there. Some questions, to help me get a feel for the topic.

                            If you train NESTs on either the Cambridge or Trinity certificate, how do you interpret the excerpts reproduced above? What kind of input sessions do you give on `culture', and how do you assess whether trainees have gained cultural understanding?
                            It would appear, from the syllabi, that cross-cultural training focuses on what happens in the classroom. How well are trainees prepared for life / work abroad? (Or is that beyond the remit of a four-week course)?
                            If you are a NEST who has taken an initial training course before travelling to a teaching job abroad, did you feel sufficiently well prepared?
                            These questions are very broad but any feedback is welcome. I have posted this request at http://www.livesofteachers.com/2011/02/04/intercultural-training-for-pre-service-teachers-a-favour/ , where you may also respond. If you would like to answer but would rather not respond in a public forum, please feel free to contact me directly at darrenrelliott@...
                            Any response will be confidential and identities will be protected. If you want to forward this to colleagues who are not active online, please do so.

                            Thanks in advance and your help is much appreciated! 

                             
                            Darren Elliott
                            Japan

                            >

                          • McMorrow, Martin
                            Hi Darren, Culture comes up in assessment criteria for the written assignments and teaching practice in Celta courses: Assignments: One of the four written
                            Message 13 of 19 , Feb 6, 2011
                            • 0 Attachment

                              Hi Darren,

                               

                              ‘Culture’ comes up in assessment criteria for the written assignments and teaching practice in Celta courses:

                               

                              Assignments:

                               

                              One of the four written assignments on a Celta course is ‘Focus on the Learner’. Different centres have different forms of assignment, but they all involve describing specific learners and implications for course content, methodology etc based on their findings . One of the assessment criteria for this assignment is: showing awareness of how a learner’s/learners’ background(s), previous learning experience and learning style(s) affect learning.

                               

                              Teaching Practice:

                               

                              In their teaching practice, the candidates also have to satisfy a number of criteria related to cultural awareness:

                               

                              1a teaching a class with an awareness of the needs and interests of the learner group

                              1b teaching a class with an awareness of learning styles and cultural factors that may affect learning

                              1c acknowledging, when necessary, learners’ backgrounds and previous learning experiences

                               

                              Centres vary regarding input directly on this topic. Apart from input sessions, tutors spend quite a bit of time in planning and feedback on teaching practice and the issue of addressing the cultural needs / interests of the learners does come up quite a bit. The candidates also observe both their colleagues and experienced teachers in the school – so there’s a ‘community of practice’ element to the cultural learning over and above direct instruction.

                               

                              Preparing teachers to live / work abroad

                               

                              In terms of preparing teachers for life / work abroad, this isn’t one of the three principal aims of the Celta course. Not everyone who does the course intends to work outside their own country - only a minority of the Celta graduates I’ve spoken to here in NZ have any immediate travel plans - though intercultural awareness is certainly an important knowledge /skill for ESOL teachers.

                               

                              According to the syllabus, the main aims of the Celta are as follows:

                               

                              The course enables candidates to

                               

                              • acquire essential subject knowledge and familiarity with the principles of effective teaching

                              • acquire a range of practical skills for teaching English to adult learners

                              • demonstrate their ability to apply their learning in a real teaching context

                               

                              The syllabus does go on to say that ‘candidates who complete the course successfully can begin working in a variety of ESOL teaching contexts around the world’ – the operative word there, I think, is ‘begin’ – ie that they’ll continue to need support as they develop their knowledge and skills – not only about culture, but in regard to their knowledge about language, methodology, resources etc.

                               

                              Martin McMorrow, Massey University, New Zealand

                              External moderator for Celta and Delta courses

                               

                              From: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TDSIG@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of darren
                              Sent: Monday, 7 February 2011 3:49 p.m.
                              To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: [TDSIG] Culture and initial teacher training

                               

                               

                              Searching the Cambridge CELTA syllabus for `culture', I discover the following.

                              Unit 1 ELearners and teachers and the teaching and learning context
                              >
                              > 1.1 Cultural, linguistic and educational backgrounds
                              Demonstrate an understanding of the range of backgrounds and experiences that adult learners bring to their classes
                               

                              A quick scoot around the Trinity CertTESOL site yields similar resultsE

                               Learning objectives
                              Successful trainees will be able to demonstrate the following on completion of the course:
                              b. awareness of the learning needs of individuals or groups of learners, and of the motivation of learners in a variety of cultures and environments
                               
                              These two organisations are the prominent international providers of entry level TEFL qualifications, and many of the trainees on these courses will go on to their first teaching jobs after receiving their certificates. A fairly large number, I would predict, would be NEST's , and a lot of them would be going on to their first extended forays into foreign cultures.
                               
                              I am at the preliminary stages of work on a paper at the moment, and I wonder if I could draw on the expertise of teacher trainers and trainees out there. Some questions, to help me get a feel for the topic.

                              If you train NESTs on either the Cambridge or Trinity certificate, how do you interpret the excerpts reproduced above? What kind of input sessions do you give on `culture', and how do you assess whether trainees have gained cultural understanding?
                              It would appear, from the syllabi, that cross-cultural training focuses on what happens in the classroom. How well are trainees prepared for life / work abroad? (Or is that beyond the remit of a four-week course)?
                              If you are a NEST who has taken an initial training course before travelling to a teaching job abroad, did you feel sufficiently well prepared?
                              These questions are very broad but any feedback is welcome. I have posted this request at http://www.livesofteachers.com/2011/02/04/intercultural-training-for-pre-service-teachers-a-favour/ , where you may also respond. If you would like to answer but would rather not respond in a public forum, please feel free to contact me directly at darrenrelliott@...
                              Any response will be confidential and identities will be protected. If you want to forward this to colleagues who are not active online, please do so.

                              Thanks in advance and your help is much appreciated! 

                               
                              Darren Elliott
                              Japan

                              >

                            • darren
                              Thanks Martin, a comprehensive response, and plenty of little nuggets to chew on. It s interesting that you mention many trainees in NZ do not have plans to
                              Message 14 of 19 , Feb 6, 2011
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Thanks Martin, a comprehensive response, and plenty of little nuggets to chew on. It's interesting that you mention many trainees in NZ do not have plans to teach abroad. I've actually been looking around for a statistics about that kind of thing. How many CELTA trainees go on to jobs in teaching within the first year (and where), how many are NESTs. I am sure that information is available somewhere but aside from the grades achieved by candidates in each partcipating country, I haven't tracked it down yet.

                                You are quite right to highlight the word 'begin'. I dug out my old CELTA transcript and it is littered with hedging language like 'with support' and 'has the potential to become...'. I think Cambridge ESOL recognise what can be achieved in four weeks, and what the aims of such a course should be with regard to cultural training. Still interested to hear what others have to say though.

                                Thanks again,

                                Darren

                                > Hi Darren,
                                >
                                > 'Culture' comes up in assessment criteria for the written assignments and teaching practice in Celta courses:
                                >
                                > Assignments:
                                >
                                > One of the four written assignments on a Celta course is 'Focus on the Learner'. Different centres have different forms of assignment, but they all involve describing specific learners and implications for course content, methodology etc based on their findings . One of the assessment criteria for this assignment is: showing awareness of how a learner's/learners' background(s), previous learning experience and learning style(s) affect learning.
                                >
                                > Teaching Practice:
                                >
                                > In their teaching practice, the candidates also have to satisfy a number of criteria related to cultural awareness:
                                >
                                > 1a teaching a class with an awareness of the needs and interests of the learner group
                                > 1b teaching a class with an awareness of learning styles and cultural factors that may affect learning
                                > 1c acknowledging, when necessary, learners' backgrounds and previous learning experiences
                                >
                                > Centres vary regarding input directly on this topic. Apart from input sessions, tutors spend quite a bit of time in planning and feedback on teaching practice and the issue of addressing the cultural needs / interests of the learners does come up quite a bit. The candidates also observe both their colleagues and experienced teachers in the school - so there's a 'community of practice' element to the cultural learning over and above direct instruction.
                                >
                                > Preparing teachers to live / work abroad
                                >
                                > In terms of preparing teachers for life / work abroad, this isn't one of the three principal aims of the Celta course. Not everyone who does the course intends to work outside their own country - only a minority of the Celta graduates I've spoken to here in NZ have any immediate travel plans - though intercultural awareness is certainly an important knowledge /skill for ESOL teachers.
                                >
                                > According to the syllabus, the main aims of the Celta are as follows:
                                >
                                > The course enables candidates to
                                >
                                > * acquire essential subject knowledge and familiarity with the principles of effective teaching
                                > * acquire a range of practical skills for teaching English to adult learners
                                > * demonstrate their ability to apply their learning in a real teaching context
                                >
                                > The syllabus does go on to say that 'candidates who complete the course successfully can begin working in a variety of ESOL teaching contexts around the world' - the operative word there, I think, is 'begin' - ie that they'll continue to need support as they develop their knowledge and skills - not only about culture, but in regard to their knowledge about language, methodology, resources etc.
                                >
                                > Martin McMorrow, Massey University, New Zealand
                                > External moderator for Celta and Delta courses
                                >
                              • Duncan Foord
                                Hi Darren Our Trinity CertTESOL courses do not include specific input on culture. In Prague and Barcelona trainees are expected to develop sensitivity to the
                                Message 15 of 19 , Feb 7, 2011
                                • 0 Attachment

                                  Hi Darren

                                   

                                  Our Trinity CertTESOL courses do not include specific input on culture. In Prague and Barcelona trainees are expected to develop sensitivity to the local cultures through teaching practice (and living there for a month) with guidance and feedback from tutors. This experience in cultural awareness provides a model  which they can draw on when working elsewhere. The specifics they would be expected to deal with at destination, presumably with the help of the employing organisation.

                                   

                                  In one of the assessed assignments on the Trinity CertTESOL candidates are expected to discuss material they have created for learners and how this material might or might not be appropriate for learners in different contexts.

                                   

                                  I think it is a strenth of Trinity certTESOL and CELTA courses that learning (through teaching practice)  is largely experiential. The  importance of cultural considerations is unlikely not to emerge in these circumstances

                                   

                                  Duncan

                                   


                                  De: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TDSIG@yahoogroups.com] En nombre de darren
                                  Enviado el: lunes, 07 de febrero de 20
                                  11 7:09
                                  Para: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
                                  Asunto: [TDSIG] Re: Culture and initial teacher training

                                   

                                   

                                  Thanks Martin, a comprehensive response, and plenty of little nuggets to chew on. It's interesting that you mention many trainees in NZ do not have plans to teach abroad. I've actually been looking around for a statistics about that kind of thing. How many CELTA trainees go on to jobs in teaching within the first year (and where), how many are NESTs. I am sure that information is available somewhere but aside from the grades achieved by candidates in each partcipating country, I haven't tracked it down yet.

                                  You are quite right to highlight the word 'begin'. I dug out my old CELTA transcript and it is littered with hedging language like 'with support' and 'has the potential to become...'. I think Cambridge ESOL recognise what can be achieved in four weeks, and what the aims of such a course should be with regard to cultural training. Still interested to hear what others have to say though.

                                  Thanks again,

                                  Darren

                                  > Hi Darren,
                                  >
                                  > 'Culture' comes up in assessment criteria for the written assignments and
                                  teaching practice in Celta courses:
                                  >
                                  > Assignments:
                                  >
                                  > One of the four written assignments on a Celta course is 'Focus on the
                                  Learner'. Different centres have different forms of assignment, but they all involve describing specific learners and implications for course content, methodology etc based on their findings . One of the assessment criteria for this assignment is: showing awareness of how a learner's/learners' background(s), previous learning experience and learning style(s) affect learning.
                                  >
                                  > Teaching Practice:
                                  >
                                  > In their teaching practice, the candidates also have to satisfy a number
                                  of criteria related to cultural awareness:
                                  >
                                  > 1a teaching a class with an awareness of the needs and interests of the
                                  learner group
                                  > 1b teaching a class with an awareness of learning styles and cultural
                                  factors that may affect learning
                                  > 1c acknowledging, when necessary, learners' backgrounds and previous
                                  learning experiences
                                  >
                                  > Centres vary regarding input directly on this topic. Apart from input
                                  sessions, tutors spend quite a bit of time in planning and feedback on teaching practice and the issue of addressing the cultural needs / interests of the learners does come up quite a bit. The candidates also observe both their colleagues and experienced teachers in the school - so there's a 'community of practice' element to the cultural learning over and above direct instruction.
                                  >
                                  > Preparing teachers to live / work abroad
                                  >
                                  > In terms of preparing teachers for life / work abroad, this isn't one of
                                  the three principal aims of the Celta course. Not everyone who does the course intends to work outside their own country - only a minority of the Celta graduates I've spoken to here in NZ have any immediate travel plans - though intercultural awareness is certainly an important knowledge /skill for ESOL teachers.
                                  >
                                  > According to the syllabus, the main aims of the Celta are as follows:
                                  >
                                  > The course enables candidates to
                                  >
                                  > * acquire essential subject knowledge and familiarity with the principles
                                  of effective teaching
                                  > * acquire a range of practical skills for teaching English to adult
                                  learners
                                  > * demonstrate their ability to apply their learning in a real teaching
                                  context
                                  >
                                  > The syllabus does go on to say that 'candidates who complete the course
                                  successfully can begin working in a variety of ESOL teaching contexts around the world' - the operative word there, I think, is 'begin' - ie that they'll continue to need support as they develop their knowledge and skills - not only about culture, but in regard to their knowledge about language, methodology, resources etc.
                                  >
                                  > Martin McMorrow, Massey University, New Zealand
                                  > External moderator for Celta and Delta courses
                                  >

                                • Karen Richardson
                                  Hi Duncan, Your courses may not have specific cultural input, but in the same way as doing the cert in Prague is an enriching thrown-in-the-deep-end cultural
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Feb 7, 2011
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Hi Duncan,
                                    Your courses may not have specific cultural input, but in the same way as doing the cert in Prague is an enriching thrown-in-the-deep-end cultural experience, so was (for me anyway) doing the Diploma in Spain. So, I guess it just depends on where you're standing at the time as to whether you see this as cultural input or not.
                                    For me it was very interesting to find out how 'German' I have become in the past 15 years or so (remember me coming in early to clean the boards and wondering whey the students were late, and why the lessons continued so late into the evening but started so late in the morning? etc etc).
                                    I'm sure your cert students make similar experiences even if it's not part of the Trinity curriculum.
                                    Karen
                                     
                                    BTW Darren, I did the cert in Sussex, near my home town, so there I gained no explicit or implicit cultural input from the course, but I did from the students we were 'allowed' to practice on, many of who were Chinese, and also from the individual student assessment task on a Brazilian student in which it was necessary to find out about culture to understand the language learning requirements (admittedly this was more than a couple of years ago but I doubt if things have changed that much).
                                     
                                     
                                    ----- Original Message -----
                                    Sent: Monday, February 07, 2011 5:48 PM
                                    Subject: RE: [TDSIG] Re: Culture and initial teacher training

                                     

                                    Hi Darren

                                    Our Trinity CertTESOL courses do not include specific input on culture. In Prague and Barcelona trainees are expected to develop sensitivity to the local cultures through teaching practice (and living there for a month) with guidance and feedback from tutors. This experience in cultural awareness provides a model  which they can draw on when working elsewhere. The specifics they would be expected to deal with at destination, presumably with the help of the employing organisation.

                                    In one of the assessed assignments on the Trinity CertTESOL candidates are expected to discuss material they have created for learners and how this material might or might not be appropriate for learners in different contexts.

                                    I think it is a strenth of Trinity certTESOL and CELTA courses that learning (through teaching practice)  is largely experiential. The  importance of cultural considerations is unlikely not to emerge in these circumstances

                                    Duncan


                                    De: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TDSIG@yahoogroups.com] En nombre de darren
                                    Enviado el: lunes, 07 de febrero de 20
                                    11 7:09
                                    Para: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
                                    Asunto: [TDSIG] Re: Culture and initial teacher training

                                     

                                    Thanks Martin, a comprehensive response, and plenty of little nuggets to chew on. It's interesting that you mention many trainees in NZ do not have plans to teach abroad. I've actually been looking around for a statistics about that kind of thing. How many CELTA trainees go on to jobs in teaching within the first year (and where), how many are NESTs. I am sure that information is available somewhere but aside from the grades achieved by candidates in each partcipating country, I haven't tracked it down yet.

                                    You are quite right to highlight the word 'begin'. I dug out my old CELTA transcript and it is littered with hedging language like 'with support' and 'has the potential to become...'. I think Cambridge ESOL recognise what can be achieved in four weeks, and what the aims of such a course should be with regard to cultural training. Still interested to hear what others have to say though.

                                    Thanks again,

                                    Darren

                                    > Hi Darren,
                                    >
                                    > 'Culture' comes up in assessment criteria for the written assignments and teaching practice in Celta courses:
                                    >
                                    > Assignments:
                                    >
                                    > One of the four written assignments on a Celta course is 'Focus on the Learner'. Different centres have different forms of assignment, but they all involve describing specific learners and implications for course content, methodology etc based on their findings . One of the assessment criteria for this assignment is: showing awareness of how a learner's/learners' background(s), previous learning experience and learning style(s) affect learning.
                                    >
                                    > Teaching Practice:
                                    >
                                    > In their teaching practice, the candidates also have to satisfy a number of criteria related to cultural awareness:
                                    >
                                    > 1a teaching a class with an awareness of the needs and interests of the learner group
                                    > 1b teaching a class with an awareness of learning styles and cultural factors that may affect learning
                                    > 1c acknowledging, when necessary, learners' backgrounds and previous learning experiences
                                    >
                                    > Centres vary regarding input directly on this topic. Apart from input sessions, tutors spend quite a bit of time in planning and feedback on teaching practice and the issue of addressing the cultural needs / interests of the learners does come up quite a bit. The candidates also observe both their colleagues and experienced teachers in the school - so there's a 'community of practice' element to the cultural learning over and above direct instruction.
                                    >
                                    > Preparing teachers to live / work abroad
                                    >
                                    > In terms of preparing teachers for life / work abroad, this isn't one of the three principal aims of the Celta course. Not everyone who does the course intends to work outside their own country - only a minority of the Celta graduates I've spoken to here in NZ have any immediate travel plans - though intercultural awareness is certainly an important knowledge /skill for ESOL teachers.
                                    >
                                    > According to the syllabus, the main aims of the Celta are as follows:
                                    >
                                    > The course enables candidates to
                                    >
                                    > * acquire essential subject knowledge and familiarity with the principles of effective teaching
                                    > * acquire a range of practical skills for teaching English to adult learners
                                    > * demonstrate their ability to apply their learning in a real teaching context
                                    >
                                    > The syllabus does go on to say that 'candidates who complete the course successfully can begin working in a variety of ESOL teaching contexts around the world' - the operative word there, I think, is 'begin' - ie that they'll continue to need support as they develop their knowledge and skills - not only about culture, but in regard to their knowledge about language, methodology, resources etc.
                                    >
                                    > Martin McMorrow, Massey University, New Zealand
                                    > External moderator for Celta and Delta courses
                                    >

                                  • Mark Bain
                                    As a teacher trainer on the CertTESOL course in Barcelona, I can back up Karen s comments on the indirect cultural awareness raising that takes place on these
                                    Message 17 of 19 , Feb 10, 2011
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      As a teacher trainer on the CertTESOL course in Barcelona, I can back up Karen's comments on the indirect cultural awareness raising that takes place on these courses.
                                      I recall one trainee, who'd spent a year teaching teens in Korea, really losing his cool in the classroom after one adult student got up during a grammar presentation to answer his mobile phone. I'd say that was par for the course here in Spain, but he found it utterly disrespectful, and proceeded to tell the students so. I'm not sure, though, how positive this sink-or-swim experience is for everyone, as it can easily verge on culture shock. At the end of the course, he headed back to Korea vowing never to teach in Spain again.


                                      On 7 February 2011 19:21, Karen Richardson <karen.richardson@...> wrote:
                                       

                                      Hi Duncan,
                                      Your courses may not have specific cultural input, but in the same way as doing the cert in Prague is an enriching thrown-in-the-deep-end cultural experience, so was (for me anyway) doing the Diploma in Spain. So, I guess it just depends on where you're standing at the time as to whether you see this as cultural input or not.
                                      For me it was very interesting to find out how 'German' I have become in the past 15 years or so (remember me coming in early to clean the boards and wondering whey the students were late, and why the lessons continued so late into the evening but started so late in the morning? etc etc).
                                      I'm sure your cert students make similar experiences even if it's not part of the Trinity curriculum.
                                      Karen
                                       
                                      BTW Darren, I did the cert in Sussex, near my home town, so there I gained no explicit or implicit cultural input from the course, but I did from the students we were 'allowed' to practice on, many of who were Chinese, and also from the individual student assessment task on a Brazilian student in which it was necessary to find out about culture to understand the language learning requirements (admittedly this was more than a couple of years ago but I doubt if things have changed that much).
                                       
                                       
                                      ----- Original Message -----
                                      Sent: Monday, February 07, 2011 5:48 PM
                                      Subject: RE: [TDSIG] Re: Culture and initial teacher training

                                       

                                      Hi Darren

                                      Our Trinity CertTESOL courses do not include specific input on culture. In Prague and Barcelona trainees are expected to develop sensitivity to the local cultures through teaching practice (and living there for a month) with guidance and feedback from tutors. This experience in cultural awareness provides a model  which they can draw on when working elsewhere. The specifics they would be expected to deal with at destination, presumably with the help of the employing organisation.

                                      In one of the assessed assignments on the Trinity CertTESOL candidates are expected to discuss material they have created for learners and how this material might or might not be appropriate for learners in different contexts.

                                      I think it is a strenth of Trinity certTESOL and CELTA courses that learning (through teaching practice)  is largely experiential. The  importance of cultural considerations is unlikely not to emerge in these circumstances

                                      Duncan


                                      De: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TDSIG@yahoogroups.com] En nombre de darren
                                      Enviado el: lunes, 07 de febrero de 20
                                      11 7:09
                                      Para: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
                                      Asunto: [TDSIG] Re: Culture and initial teacher training

                                       

                                      Thanks Martin, a comprehensive response, and plenty of little nuggets to chew on. It's interesting that you mention many trainees in NZ do not have plans to teach abroad. I've actually been looking around for a statistics about that kind of thing. How many CELTA trainees go on to jobs in teaching within the first year (and where), how many are NESTs. I am sure that information is available somewhere but aside from the grades achieved by candidates in each partcipating country, I haven't tracked it down yet.

                                      You are quite right to highlight the word 'begin'. I dug out my old CELTA transcript and it is littered with hedging language like 'with support' and 'has the potential to become...'. I think Cambridge ESOL recognise what can be achieved in four weeks, and what the aims of such a course should be with regard to cultural training. Still interested to hear what others have to say though.

                                      Thanks again,

                                      Darren

                                      > Hi Darren,
                                      >
                                      > 'Culture' comes up in assessment criteria for the written assignments and teaching practice in Celta courses:
                                      >
                                      > Assignments:
                                      >
                                      > One of the four written assignments on a Celta course is 'Focus on the Learner'. Different centres have different forms of assignment, but they all involve describing specific learners and implications for course content, methodology etc based on their findings . One of the assessment criteria for this assignment is: showing awareness of how a learner's/learners' background(s), previous learning experience and learning style(s) affect learning.
                                      >
                                      > Teaching Practice:
                                      >
                                      > In their teaching practice, the candidates also have to satisfy a number of criteria related to cultural awareness:
                                      >
                                      > 1a teaching a class with an awareness of the needs and interests of the learner group
                                      > 1b teaching a class with an awareness of learning styles and cultural factors that may affect learning
                                      > 1c acknowledging, when necessary, learners' backgrounds and previous learning experiences
                                      >
                                      > Centres vary regarding input directly on this topic. Apart from input sessions, tutors spend quite a bit of time in planning and feedback on teaching practice and the issue of addressing the cultural needs / interests of the learners does come up quite a bit. The candidates also observe both their colleagues and experienced teachers in the school - so there's a 'community of practice' element to the cultural learning over and above direct instruction.
                                      >
                                      > Preparing teachers to live / work abroad
                                      >
                                      > In terms of preparing teachers for life / work abroad, this isn't one of the three principal aims of the Celta course. Not everyone who does the course intends to work outside their own country - only a minority of the Celta graduates I've spoken to here in NZ have any immediate travel plans - though intercultural awareness is certainly an important knowledge /skill for ESOL teachers.
                                      >
                                      > According to the syllabus, the main aims of the Celta are as follows:
                                      >
                                      > The course enables candidates to
                                      >
                                      > * acquire essential subject knowledge and familiarity with the principles of effective teaching
                                      > * acquire a range of practical skills for teaching English to adult learners
                                      > * demonstrate their ability to apply their learning in a real teaching context
                                      >
                                      > The syllabus does go on to say that 'candidates who complete the course successfully can begin working in a variety of ESOL teaching contexts around the world' - the operative word there, I think, is 'begin' - ie that they'll continue to need support as they develop their knowledge and skills - not only about culture, but in regard to their knowledge about language, methodology, resources etc.
                                      >
                                      > Martin McMorrow, Massey University, New Zealand
                                      > External moderator for Celta and Delta courses
                                      >




                                      --
                                      Mark Crawford Bain



                                    • Juliet du Mont
                                      Hi All, I tend to agree with Duncan´s comment regarding the value of learning on the job and how this must relate to sensitivity to cultural issues. It is a
                                      Message 18 of 19 , Feb 10, 2011
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        Hi All,
                                         
                                        I tend to agree with Duncan´s comment regarding the value of learning on the job and how this must relate to sensitivity to cultural issues.  It is a whole other remove to read about these issues and have time to ponder their implications.  No matter how much study you may have done, the live experience will always come at you as a blast of ´different´air!
                                         
                                        Juliet


                                        To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
                                        From: duncan@...
                                        Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2011 17:48:22 +0100
                                        Subject: RE: [TDSIG] Re: Culture and initial teacher training

                                         

                                        Hi Darren

                                         

                                        Our Trinity CertTESOL courses do not include specific input on culture. In Prague and Barcelona trainees are expected to develop sensitivity to the local cultures through teaching practice (and living there for a month) with guidance and feedback from tutors. This experience in cultural awareness provides a model  which they can draw on when working elsewhere. The specifics they would be expected to deal with at destination, presumably with the help of the employing organisation.

                                         

                                        In one of the assessed assignments on the Trinity CertTESOL candidates are expected to discuss material they have created for learners and how this material might or might not be appropriate for learners in different contexts.

                                         

                                        I think it is a strenth of Trinity certTESOL and CELTA courses that learning (through teaching practice)  is largely experiential. The  importance of cultural considerations is unlikely not to emerge in these circumstances

                                         

                                        Duncan

                                         


                                        De: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TDSIG@yahoogroups.com] En nombre de darren
                                        Enviado el: lunes, 07 de febrero de 20
                                        11 7:09
                                        Para: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
                                        Asunto: [TDSIG] Re: Culture and initial teacher training

                                         

                                         

                                        Thanks Martin, a comprehensive response, and plenty of little nuggets to chew on. It's interesting that you mention many trainees in NZ do not have plans to teach abroad. I've actually been looking around for a statistics about that kind of thing. How many CELTA trainees go on to jobs in teaching within the first year (and where), how many are NESTs. I am sure that information is available somewhere but aside from the grades achieved by candidates in each partcipating country, I haven't tracked it down yet.

                                        You are quite right to highlight the word 'begin'. I dug out my old CELTA transcript and it is littered with hedging language like 'with support' and 'has the potential to become...'. I think Cambridge ESOL recognise what can be achieved in four weeks, and what the aims of such a course should be with regard to cultural training. Still interested to hear what others have to say though.

                                        Thanks again,

                                        Darren

                                        > Hi Darren,
                                        >
                                        > 'Culture' comes up in assessment criteria for the written assignments and teaching practice in Celta courses:
                                        >
                                        > Assignments:
                                        >
                                        > One of the four written assignments on a Celta course is 'Focus on the Learner'. Different centres have different forms of assignment, but they all involve describing specific learners and implications for course content, methodology etc based on their findings . One of the assessment criteria for this assignment is: showing awareness of how a learner's/learners' background(s), previous learning experience and learning style(s) affect learning.
                                        >
                                        > Teaching Practice:
                                        >
                                        > In their teaching practice, the candidates also have to satisfy a number of criteria related to cultural awareness:
                                        >
                                        > 1a teaching a class with an awareness of the needs and interests of the learner group
                                        > 1b teaching a class with an awareness of learning styles and cultural factors that may affect learning
                                        > 1c acknowledging, when necessary, learners' backgrounds and previous learning experiences
                                        >
                                        > Centres vary regarding input directly on this topic. Apart from input sessions, tutors spend quite a bit of time in planning and feedback on teaching practice and the issue of addressing the cultural needs / interests of the learners does come up quite a bit. The candidates also observe both their colleagues and experienced teachers in the school - so there's a 'community of practice' element to the cultural learning over and above direct instruction.
                                        >
                                        > Preparing teachers to live / work abroad
                                        >
                                        > In terms of preparing teachers for life / work abroad, this isn't one of the three principal aims of the Celta course. Not everyone who does the course intends to work outside their own country - only a minority of the Celta graduates I've spoken to here in NZ have any immediate travel plans - though intercultural awareness is certainly an important knowledge /skill for ESOL teachers.
                                        >
                                        > According to the syllabus, the main aims of the Celta are as follows:
                                        >
                                        > The course enables candidates to
                                        >
                                        > * acquire essential subject knowledge and familiarity with the principles of effective teaching
                                        > * acquire a range of practical skills for teaching English to adult learners
                                        > * demonstrate their ability to apply their learning in a real teaching context
                                        >
                                        > The syllabus does go on to say that 'candidates who complete the course successfully can begin working in a variety of ESOL teaching contexts around the world' - the operative word there, I think, is 'begin' - ie that they'll continue to need support as they develop their knowledge and skills - not only about culture, but in regard to their knowledge about language, methodology, resources etc.
                                        >
                                        > Martin McMorrow, Massey University, New Zealand
                                        > External moderator for Celta and Delta courses
                                        >


                                      • darren
                                        Thanks everyone, for the thoughtful replies. Sorry I haven t been back to respond before now. A couple of interesting directions occur to me from reading your
                                        Message 19 of 19 , Feb 16, 2011
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          Thanks everyone, for the thoughtful replies. Sorry I haven't been back to respond before now. A couple of interesting directions occur to me from reading your answers. First of all, I know that many CELTA trainees are already studying in a foreign context (I'm a 'Pom' but I took mine in Melbourne). I imagine there must be stats available - I would love to see who was taking which course where. As you all mention, the experience of teaching foreign students itself is a primer for the cultural insights needed for a successful future career. But words like implicit, indirect, immersive I am not so sure about - do trainees need to be trained explicitly to 'notice' cultural difference, and do they need a framework for interpreting and dealing with it? This is something which could be 'taught' to some degree on an initial training course, no? Is there room for a preliminary tool kit? And what would it contain?

                                          Thanks again ; D

                                          Darren
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