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Spring/ IATEFL greetings

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  • Elka Todeva
    Dear all: Our list has been quiet for quite some times now but I would like to believe that the winter hibernation is over. We still have snow in New England,
    Message 1 of 11 , Apr 8 6:30 PM
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      Dear all:

      Our list has been quiet for quite some times now but I would like to
      believe that the winter hibernation is over. We still have snow in New
      England, but Spring is in the air and I hope that wherever we are, we all
      will be energized by the budding trees and the robins, and by the various
      events planned for IATEFL just a week from today.

      I talked to Donald Freeman last week and he agreed to do a posting for
      our list with the idea to start a fielded discussion. He was on the West
      Coast when I talked to him, but he agreed to prepare something the moment
      he gets home. Many of you know Donald as one of the past presidents of
      TESOL and for his numerous publications on teacher development.

      I also thought that while waiting for Donald’s posting we could share
      what people will be presenting on in Aberdeen, those of us who will have
      the opportunity to attend the 41 IATEFL.

      Hopefully, this sharing will trigger questions, reactions, and further
      sharing.

      Willing to take the risk of being accused of making a ‘self-advertising
      move’, here is what I am planning to explore with colleagues during my
      workshop in Aberdeen.

      ************
      Scaffolded Reflection

      Elka Todeva
      School for International Training
      abstract submitted to IATEFL


      Our growth as teachers is shaped by our professional socialization and is
      nurtured by our keeping current with important new developments in our
      profession as well as with developments in other fields related to
      language learning, and learning in general. How much we grow depends even
      more on our ability to understand and conceptualize our own teaching
      practice in new or deeper ways.

      John Dewey has inspired many of us to critically examine our teaching and
      undertake reasoned, transformative action through observation,
      reflection, multi-faceted interpretation and disciplined collaboration.
      In this workshop, participants will be guided into using various
      techniques for enhancing their observational, reflective, and
      interpretative capacity. Some of the techniques chosen for exploration
      were developed by educators John Fanselow and Peter Senge, and by artists
      Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso. Those of the latter two have been
      adapted for the purposes of language teaching by the presenter.

      The multi-domain (art, philately, language teaching) approach employed in
      the workshop has been purposefully chosen to demonstrate the commonality
      of important underlying principles defining any kind of learning.
      Awareness of such commonalities may serve to further encourage
      participants to look for more cross-discipline and cross-domain
      connections informing our daily teaching practice.

      **********

      The techniques offered for exploration during the workshop are all
      techniques that have been very instrumental for my personal development
      as a language educator. This led me to using them in teacher training,
      which resulted in much valuable refinement and further enrichment. I will
      be very interested to hear how list members have been enhancing their
      observational and reflective capacity. If people show interest in this
      topic, I will be more than willing to share what has been helping me to
      become a better reflective practitioner.

      Please write. Let’s get the list going again,

      elka
    • Ingrid Gürtler
      Dear Elka, Since you are talking about cross-discipline and cross-domain connections, only thing I would like to add at the moment is that I am using some of
      Message 2 of 11 , Apr 9 10:36 AM
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        Dear Elka,
        Since you are talking about cross-discipline and cross-domain
        connections, only thing I would like to add at the moment is that I am
        using some of the short time remaining this week to hone my parquet
        laying and refurbishing wall paper skills. We have just finished putting
        down a floor in our smallest but most angled room. I can do straight
        walls, but spatial relations not being my best intelligence I learned a
        lot just watching my husband measure and saw. At the same time I was
        mustering all my geometry skills to check what he was doing against what
        seemed to me a reasonable solution. We usually came out agreeing. At
        times I was also able to offer useful suggestions in terms of avoiding
        too much waste etc. Observing seems to be something that I do quite
        often, comparing what someone else does with what I might do or adding
        what someone else does to a possible repertoire or tool kit to be used
        sometime later or right away as the case may be. I am certainly looking
        forward to your workshop.
        All the best
        Ingrid

        Elka Todeva schrieb:

        >
        > Dear all:
        >
        > Our list has been quiet for quite some times now but I would like to
        > believe that the winter hibernation is over. We still have snow in New
        > England, but Spring is in the air and I hope that wherever we are, we all
        > will be energized by the budding trees and the robins, and by the various
        > events planned for IATEFL just a week from today.
        >
        > I talked to Donald Freeman last week and he agreed to do a posting for
        > our list with the idea to start a fielded discussion. He was on the West
        > Coast when I talked to him, but he agreed to prepare something the moment
        > he gets home. Many of you know Donald as one of the past presidents of
        > TESOL and for his numerous publications on teacher development.
        >
        > I also thought that while waiting for Donald’s posting we could share
        > what people will be presenting on in Aberdeen, those of us who will have
        > the opportunity to attend the 41 IATEFL.
        >
        > Hopefully, this sharing will trigger questions, reactions, and further
        > sharing.
        >
        > Willing to take the risk of being accused of making a ‘self-advertising
        > move’, here is what I am planning to explore with colleagues during my
        > workshop in Aberdeen.
        >
        > ************
        > Scaffolded Reflection
        >
        > Elka Todeva
        > School for International Training
        > abstract submitted to IATEFL
        >
        > Our growth as teachers is shaped by our professional socialization and is
        > nurtured by our keeping current with important new developments in our
        > profession as well as with developments in other fields related to
        > language learning, and learning in general. How much we grow depends even
        > more on our ability to understand and conceptualize our own teaching
        > practice in new or deeper ways.
        >
        > John Dewey has inspired many of us to critically examine our teaching and
        > undertake reasoned, transformative action through observation,
        > reflection, multi-faceted interpretation and disciplined collaboration.
        > In this workshop, participants will be guided into using various
        > techniques for enhancing their observational, reflective, and
        > interpretative capacity. Some of the techniques chosen for exploration
        > were developed by educators John Fanselow and Peter Senge, and by artists
        > Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso. Those of the latter two have been
        > adapted for the purposes of language teaching by the presenter.
        >
        > The multi-domain (art, philately, language teaching) approach employed in
        > the workshop has been purposefully chosen to demonstrate the commonality
        > of important underlying principles defining any kind of learning.
        > Awareness of such commonalities may serve to further encourage
        > participants to look for more cross-discipline and cross-domain
        > connections informing our daily teaching practice.
        >
        > **********
        >
        > The techniques offered for exploration during the workshop are all
        > techniques that have been very instrumental for my personal development
        > as a language educator. This led me to using them in teacher training,
        > which resulted in much valuable refinement and further enrichment. I will
        > be very interested to hear how list members have been enhancing their
        > observational and reflective capacity. If people show interest in this
        > topic, I will be more than willing to share what has been helping me to
        > become a better reflective practitioner.
        >
        > Please write. Let’s get the list going again,
        >
        > elka
        >
        >
      • Elka Todeva
        Ingrid: You are right. Observing how others do some of the things we do really gives us a different perspective on our practices. Also, metanoia (a shift of
        Message 3 of 11 , Apr 11 7:43 AM
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          Ingrid:

          You are right. Observing how others do some of the things we do really
          gives us a different perspective on our practices. Also, "metanoia" (a
          shift of mind) about the way we normally do things is another vehicle for
          professional growth.
          I will explore several metanoia case studies in my workshop with
          significant outcomes. I don't want to take away the element of surprise
          from those planning to attend, that is why I will offer a simple example
          here. Consider how learning is impacted very differently by corrective
          feedback if instead of the teacher doing the correction / providing the
          right answer/ doing it immediately after an error occurs, he or she
          provides some clues encouraging and allowing self-correction, people self-
          correct or negotiate things with peers if necessary, and in the process
          try to understand a general rule about the language instead of having
          just the concrete error at hand fixed. Of course, we can have many other
          scenarios here. My point is that even one shift triggers quite different
          outcomes. The more we do these shifts (even when things seem to be going
          well in our classes), the more there will be to confirm our teaching
          practice or raise questions whether we allow optimal learning to happen.

          I have to run to class. I hope we will hear soon from other presenters
          and thus start a number of interesting discussions,

          Elka


          Elka Todeva, Ph.D.
          Associate Professor
          DLTE/SIT
          tel.: 802 258 3304
          fax: 802 258 3316
        • Elka Todeva
          Ingrid: You are right. Observing how others do some of the things we do really gives us a different perspective on our practices. Also, metanoia (a shift of
          Message 4 of 11 , Apr 11 6:19 PM
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            Ingrid:

            You are right. Observing how others do some of the things we do really
            gives us a different perspective on our practices. Also, "metanoia" (a
            shift of mind) about the way we normally do things is another vehicle for
            professional growth.
            I will explore several metanoia case studies in my workshop with
            significant outcomes. I don't want to take away the element of surprise
            from those planning to attend, that is why I will offer a simple example
            here. Consider how learning is impacted very differently by corrective
            feedback if instead of the teacher doing the correction / providing the
            right answer/ doing it immediately after an error occurs, he or she
            provides some clues encouraging and allowing self-correction, people self-
            correct or negotiate things with peers if necessary, and in the process
            try to understand a general rule about the language instead of having
            just the concrete error at hand fixed. Of course, we can have many other
            scenarios here. My point is that even one shift triggers quite different
            outcomes. The more we do these shifts (even when things seem to be going
            well in our classes), the more there will be to confirm our teaching
            practice or raise questions whether we allow optimal learning to happen.

            I have to run to class. I hope we will hear soon from other presenters
            and thus start a number of interesting discussions,

            Elka


            Elka Todeva, Ph.D.
            Associate Professor
            DLTE/SIT
            tel.: 802 258 3304
            fax: 802 258 3316
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