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Stephen Hal lRe: [TDSIG] Digest Number 242

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  • Stephen J. Hall
    Dear all Recent work on reflection suggests there may be cultural constraints in using self reflection because of issues of self esteem. However on the
    Message 1 of 13 , Dec 1, 2005
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      Dear all
      Recent work on reflection suggests there may be cultural constraints in using self reflection because of issues of self esteem. However on the ground in rural teacher in- service training here  in Malaysia we employ a simple technique that I have also used with TESOL kids. To stop interaction, involve all and then ask for simple statements can focus awareness. To ask others to reflect may otherwise come across as navel gazing unless nested in real needs
       We  ask our trainee teachers to make simple verbal statements which are specifc and to note these down to revisit them during later parts of our cyclic training. They can form a platform for specific classroom change
      ` Today I learnt...
      `From todays learning I plan to....
      Today I found.........challenging
      The most useful thing for my classroom was...

      With proficency an issue we keep it simple but it works.
      Stephen Hall
      CfBT Education Services Malaysia
      TDSIG@yahoogroups.com wrote:
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      There is 1 message in this issue.

      Topics in this digest:

      1. RE: teacher reflectvity Day 1
      From: "Elka Todeva"


      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 1
      Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2005 17:40:50 -0500
      From: "Elka Todeva"
      Subject: RE: teacher reflectvity Day 1



      It seems that traffic was kind of light on day one of our fielded
      discussion. It am sure people had a busy day – I am just out of my fourth
      meeting for the day and going to a fundraiser in a minute!
      Anyway, a few comments triggered by Jenny’s posting.
      <
      an excellent opportunity for me to enhance and develop my pedagogical and
      subject matter knowledge. >>
      I am thinking of another fielded discussion later on where we can talk about
      the core courses at the various universities where people worked on their
      degrees. It will be interesting to see what the common core is and what were
      some more ‘exotic courses’ and the rationale behind them.
      <
      describing it to other teachers or writing about it seemed to crystalize the
      learning.So the developmental aspect was increased through the articulation
      process.>>
      I believe it was Jack Richards who said in one of his books that it is only
      when we make our beliefs explicit that we can critically examine them.
      <

      sharing of ideas with other teachers, as we seek to delve deeper into what
      works best with our learners and, of course, what does not work. >>
      Habermas did some research and found out that we do most of our planning and
      thinking in the shower or driving to work. Given these facts , the
      metanoia approach has some definite advantages for our constant professional
      development - not only is it constraint-free but also it can impact every
      single aspect of our work in an on-going fashion.
      <
      my personal learning gets lost if I do not systematically explore it? A
      good question.
      I am interested in the Fanselow idea - the constant shifting of perspective
      and approaching things from different angles. Does anyone else have any
      other concrete examples of how they gained insight from changing the usual
      routine in their teaching at either the level of the I/thou/or it?...
      Jenny
      Jenny has an interesting question (bolded section above) that can have other
      people involved tomorrow.
      Hasta pronto,
      elka

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Jenny de Sonneville
      To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2005 07:58:19 +0100
      Subject: RE: [TDSIG] teacher reflectvity



      Hi Elka

      Great that you are our new list moderator! Welcome!
      I am really looking forward to hearing some comments from participants about
      teacher reflectivity, so hopefully others will join in and share their
      ideas. I am going to give a response to some of your questions and comment
      on some of the theory you presented to us :
      1/ What are some of the key sources you draw upon for the enhancement and
      development of a/ your general pedagogical knowledge, and b/ your subject
      matter knowledge?
      A few years ago I did a Masters in TESP from Aston University and it was an
      excellent opportunity for me to enhance and develop my pedagogical and
      subject matter knowledge. What I enjoyed most about the Masters was the
      focus on the Kolb action research cycle - which personally I think is a
      concrete framework for what most of us were doing intuitively - recognizing
      a problem, looking for an alternative behaviour (often based on reading
      theory or discussions with others, trying it out , reflecting and adapting
      it for the next time round.) What I became aware was that articulating that
      process, either through describing it to other teachers or writing about it
      seemed to crystalize the learning.So the developmental aspect was increased
      through the articulation process.
      Your next question: Is your reflectivity triggered primarily by a perceived
      problem of some sort in your teaching and then guided by the classic
      experiential cycle - is exactly the point I would move on to next, as that
      is where I find the limitation. I do not think that development needs to be
      only problem- driven.
      In fact you mention "institutions whcih invigorate and sustain passion and
      devotion to teaching". For me an important skill for a teacher is being able
      to create high levels of energy and inspiration and especially in these days
      when education seems to be full of grim reality and threatening burnout, we
      may need to be focusing just as much on our successes and exploring our own
      sources of Flow.
      A lot of my most developmental experiences come simply through informal
      sharing of ideas with other teachers, as we seek to delve deeper into what
      works best with our learners and, of course, what does not work. This
      sharing links in with your comment about the three theories of meaningful
      learning where: "we learn optimally when we endeavor to make better sense of
      what we are already doing, i.e. when our learning is embedded in our own
      practice."
      The implication according to your summary is that, according to Fanselow and
      Caine and Caine, we need to systematically explore how the small changes
      which we make impact the learning of our students - the value of the
      structuring of the reflexivity. Looking at my own practice, there may be
      something in this - how much of my personal learning gets lost if I do not
      systematically explore it? A good question.
      I am interested in the Fanselow idea - the constant shifting of perspective
      and approaching things from different angles. Does anyone else have any
      other concrete examples of how they gained insight from changing the usual
      routine in their teaching at either the level of the I/thou/or it?...
      Jenny





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      Stephen Hall  kiakaha53@...   

      stephen@...   www.cfbt.com.my  ++60- 3- 79581782  CfBT

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    • Elka Todeva
      Late night greetings from cold VT (literally – my furnace is down and they just told me they can’t do anything about it till Monday). Anyway, it was nice
      Message 2 of 13 , Dec 2, 2005
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        Late night greetings from cold VT (literally – my furnace is down and they just told me they can’t do anything about it till Monday). Anyway, it was nice that we had several postings today.

         

        In my original posting I mentioned Hawkins’ I/thou/it triangle (“I” the teacher, “thou” the students, and “it” the subject matter) as a useful framework for examining what shapes unfolding events in a learning experience. In her message Kalina mentioned Martin Buber and his I/thou/it paradigm. For those wondering about the difference between the two, I decided to offer a brief description of the latter, taken off google:

         

        “Buber's most lasting achievement was his philosophy of Dialogue, described in I and Thou (1923). In this treatise Buber differentiated between the I-Thou and I-It relationships. The former depicts the relationship between man and the world as one of mutuality, openness, and directness - a true dialogue. The latter - the I-It - is explained as the absence of these I-Thou qualities. The partners are not equal in the I-It relationship. However, the I-It dialogue cannot be discarded because it leads to objective knowledge, and must necessarily interact with I-Thou. Yet the ultimate objective is not only the I-Thou relationship between man and the world, but between man and the eternal source of the world, namely, God.”

                                                         Thank you, Kalina

        Bob made several interesting comments:

        “I have learned (developed) much through working with people in other disciplines; and in this case, I reflect on the processes doctors and specialists go through in making their differential diagnoses, usually through a procedure of excluding things – most medical tests after all are done to exclude causes rather than to identify causes.”

        I believe this is very true indeed. In my career I had two opportunities to see such interdisciplinary cross-fertilization fostered in a beautiful way. The first experience was in what was called at the time West Berlin at a Humboldt Centre. The second one was in the Research Triangle in North Carolina in the USA. In both places, people from various disciplines we given an opportunity to spend an year doing research while pampered and supported in every imaginable way. The only requirement they all had to agree to was to have their meals with the other scholars in residence, where people took turns sharing about the research they were conducting. This sharing invariably triggered ideas and questions and forced the person doing the sharing to examine things from different perspectives. Also, similarly to what Jenny said the other day, people could clarify their ideas better while trying to make them understandable, particularly to those from other fields of study, unfamiliar with the discourse or the prevailing ideas of the speaker’s field.

         “In your opening you commented on construction of learning being driven by problems and the search for solutions. It depends of course how one interprets “problem”. I see “problem” not as something that is wrong and needs fixing, but rather as a description of a situation in need of some explanation. That is, in the teacher development context, anything that occurs (or is) can lead us to reflect on what has happened and for us to think why it occurs (or is) and what might have led to it arising - indeed what might be possible alternatives too (even solutions). This is close to your philosopher’s statement – to understand what something is you have to see what it is not.

        I think we are in total agreement here, Bob. I was referring to the way things are often interpreted and practiced here in the States with regard to the experiential cycle.

        … it may be more valuable to allocate more time to reflecting on what we have done, than on trying to do more. Not very clear, I’m afraid – I’ll try to come back on this later in the week.

        We often say that “less is more”. At the same time, before I agree with the above statement, I want to understand better what exactly you mean by the phrase highlighted in red.

        Also, if we include in our reflections input from others, feedback is all about feedforward.

        Stephen observed that …
        Recent work on reflection suggests there may be cultural constraints in using self-reflection because of issues of self esteem. However on the ground in rural teacher in- service training here  in Malaysia we employ a simple technique that I have also used with TESOL kids. To stop interaction, involve all and then ask for simple statements can focus awareness. To ask others to reflect may otherwise come across as navel gazing unless nested in real needs
         We  ask our trainee teachers to make simple verbal statements which are specifc and to note these down to revisit them during later parts of our cyclic training. They can form a platform for specific classroom change
        ` Today I learnt...
        `From today’s learning I plan to....
        Today I found.........challenging
        The most useful thing for my classroom was...

        I agree that there is a strong cultural dimension in all this. Some culture tend to be more reflective than other (e.g. the Japanese and their social norms never to jump in a conversation or respond without some time for reflection, the whole tea ceremony, the sakura (cherry blossom) contemplation for hours and hours, etc. etc). At the same time, I have often heard colleagues complain that their Japanese students are not very reflective. We clearly have two levels here. I will call them for lack of better terms the procedural and declarative level.  Or perhaps we can talk about domain specific reflectivity. It will be interesting to hear what people think about all this.

         

         

        Time to call it a day.

        Hasta manana, elka

      • Jenny de Sonneville
        Dear Elka and other participants I was interested in Bob s comments about learning from people in other disciplines. It made me reflect on how in the last
        Message 3 of 13 , Dec 3, 2005
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          Dear Elka and other participants

           

          I was interested in Bob’s comments about learning from people in other disciplines. It made me reflect on how in the last years I have found one of my greatest sources of learning is to collaborate with people who have completely different styles from my own. When I was working on my Masters I came in contact with a woman, Catherine, who was perhaps my opposite as far as Kolb’s learning styles go.

           

          At first I found Catherine seemed to look at teaching from such a different perspective from mine and I did not find that easy. As a dreamer, reflection comes easily to me. Perhaps too easily - I clearly see the dangers of the Hamlet dilemma where too much reflection can lead to inaction or as Stephen expressed it navel staring! One of the disadvantages of a dreamer can be a lack of attention to detail.  But Catherine is someone who pays strong attention to detail and sometimes has difficulty with the bigger picture. She was strong in quantitative research methodology, and at first had little time for the qualitative methods, while my interests lay much more with interviews, diaries etc. Through discussions and working together, I developed in my attention to detail and she became more reflective!  Since this experience with Catherine I see how enriching it can be to work with people whose qualities are completely different from mine. Similarly what  I find very interesting in a discussion list is to “hear” the different perspectives of the various contributors.

           

          Bob’s comment about reflecting on “what we have done rather than trying to do more” resonated with me. In the last years I feel that in each experience there is the potential for more learning if I can reflect on it and see it from different perspectives. One of the best ways to see it from different perspectives is, as Elka mentioned, feedback from others – but then of course there is the question: is it feedforward? If the feedback is given in a positive way then it can be feedforward – but the atmosphere needs to be genuinely cooperative. Perhaps one also needs to be able to be able to take distance from one’s ego in order to see one’s weaknesses as potential sources of learning.

           

          I agree with Stephen that there are cultural constraints. I would imagine that reflectivity is much more common in an individualist rather than a collectivist culture. In a collectivist culture, children learn to think in terms of ‘we’, while in an individualist culture we learn from a young age to think in terms of “I”. In a collectivist culture, the emphasis on fulfilling the expectation of the group rather than the individual and the harmony must be retained, confrontation is to be avoided. In an individualist culture one is encouraged to be more direct and say what one thinks, so from a young age the individual learns to become aware of how a situation feels for him or her – and to reflect upon it.

           

          I liked the open phrases Stephen used to focus the reflection. I think he was working with teacher trainers, which seems to be the area that we are thinking about. At our institute we also use reflection sheets with the English students and use similar open questions: What have I learned today? What was useful / not useful I the lesson? What would I like to practise more / less of?  They are adult professionals and they fill in a reflection sheet after each lesson. Often in the first reflection sheets they do not much see the point and they need some training in reflection – but as time goes on the quality of their reflection changes and they find it useful – especially when they see that the teacher is reading it and is taking their comments into consideration when planning her lessons.

           

          I suppose teacher reflectivity is a term which has a variety of resonances with each individual teacher? What do others think?

          Jenny

        • Ingrid Gürtler
          Well, part of my problem was being up to the eyeballs in various projects at the same time that my computer crashed for about a week due to various viruses
          Message 4 of 13 , Dec 5, 2005
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            Well, part of my problem was being up to the eyeballs in various projects at the same time that my computer crashed for about a week due to various viruses etc. Hence, I was reflecting on a lot of other things - also on life without a computer, which actually was quite pleasant. I had to think on my feet, and it worked quite well. For me personally after the hols would be better.
            Cheers
            Ingrid

            Elka Todeva schrieb:

            Well, it’s Tuesday again and time to end the Reflectivity fielded discussion. Last week was either a very busy time of the year for people or the topic of reflectivity failed to generate wild enthusiasm. Many thanks to Jenny, Bob, Kalina, and Stephen for their participation. I will wrap things up referring again to two good overview articles on reflectivity:

            Rodgers, C. (2002) Defining reflection: Another look at John Dewey and reflective thinking, Teachers College Record. Vol. 4, Number 4, pp. 842-866.

            Rodgers, C. (2002) Seeing student learning: Teacher change and the role of reflection, Harvard Educational Review. Vol. 72, Number 2, pp. 230-253.

            I have another topic for a fielded discussion that I would like to offer for exploration. I would like to ask the group about the timing first, however. What would work for people better – before or after the holidays? Please indicate your preferences and I will take it from there.Peace, elka

          • Elka Todeva
            Well, it’s Tuesday again and time to end the Reflectivity fielded discussion. Last week was either a very busy time of the year for people or the topic of
            Message 5 of 13 , Dec 6, 2005
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              Well, it’s Tuesday again and time to end the Reflectivity fielded discussion. Last week was either a very busy time of the year for people or the topic of reflectivity failed to generate wild enthusiasm. Many thanks to Jenny, Bob, Kalina, and Stephen for their participation. I will wrap things up referring again to two good overview articles on reflectivity:

              Rodgers, C. (2002) Defining reflection: Another look at John Dewey and reflective thinking, Teachers College Record. Vol. 4, Number 4, pp. 842-866.

              Rodgers, C. (2002) Seeing student learning: Teacher change and the role of reflection, Harvard Educational Review. Vol. 72, Number 2, pp. 230-253.

              I have another topic for a fielded discussion that I would like to offer for exploration. I would like to ask the group about the timing first, however. What would work for people better – before or after the holidays? Please indicate your preferences and I will take it from there.Peace, elka

            • Kevin Landry
              I think the initial text has to be short and very focused for others to read and respond. ... -- Kevin Landry, MA TESOL Full time Lecturer, Dept. of Liberal
              Message 6 of 13 , Dec 7, 2005
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                I think the initial text has to be short and very focused for others to read and respond.
                 

                 

                I have another topic for a fielded discussion that I would like to offer for exploration. I would like to ask the group about the timing first, however. What would work for people better – before or after the holidays? Please indicate your preferences and I will take it from there. Peace, elka




                --
                Kevin Landry, MA TESOL

                Full time Lecturer, Dept. of Liberal Arts
                KOTESOL Nominations and Elections Committee Chair  
                Teacher Education & Development SIG Facilitator

                Hongik University, Jochiwon Campus,
                Dept. of Liberal Arts, San 300, Sinan-ri,
                Jochiwon-eup, Yeongi-gun, Chungcheongnam-do
                339-701. (W) 042-860-2692, (C) 016-373-1492,
                Email: lklandry@...
              • Juliet du Mont
                Dear Elka and All, Whew! That was quick - and I am not being facetious when I say that I for one, need more time to reflect during discussion! Was there a
                Message 7 of 13 , Dec 7, 2005
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                  Dear Elka and All,

                  Whew! That was quick - and I am not being facetious when I say that I for
                  one, need more time to 'reflect' during discussion! Was there a
                  predetermined end after one week? I seem to remember our discussion on Flow
                  lasted quite a while. Elka, could you perhaps give us a few hours' warning
                  in future, so we can gather any trailing thoughts?

                  I found myself nodding vigourously to several of Jenny's and Bob's
                  contributions and maybe can add my two cents' worth before the chopper falls
                  - right now I'm in Thailand, so one day ahead ...

                  Jenny asks if anyone else has concrete examples of insight gained from
                  changing the usual routine (I/thou/it). I think merely switching the
                  student/teacher roles (say in the case of reviewing a point which some
                  members of the class may have missed) by asking a strong student to get up
                  and explain the point as 'teacher' (the getting up is seminal), not only
                  tells you how clearly the student has absorbed the information but is
                  tremendously empowering not only to the individual, but sets an example of
                  'I could do that too' to the rest of the class.

                  Jenny's question about how much of her personal learning gets lost if she
                  does not systematically explore it, for me links up with Bob's reference to
                  Habermas and his comment: oh gosh, my mind is not on the job in hand - but
                  does it matter? My feeling is that the brain's capacity is so complex,
                  marvellous and multi-tiered that perhaps it is better just to let it turn up
                  what it will without too great an effort towards structured enquiry.
                  Perhaps this is where the reflection-in-action and reflection-on-action can
                  become one? By the way, I think I once read that Garcia Marquez said he
                  always pinpointed the next stage of his writing during his 10 minute morning
                  shower.

                  To return to one of Elka's initial questions - what are some of the key
                  sources you draw upon for enhancement and development ... As a teacher
                  trainer/developer I think what often causes me to pause and reflect is when
                  I review recommendations I am about to make to others, and ask myself: do I
                  actually do that myself? Reflectivity invites an objectifying of the
                  teaching/learning process and necessarily of oneself within this. It is not
                  simple and certainly our students need training in this.

                  One more thought: maybe 'puzzle' is a more neutral alternative to
                  'problem'?

                  Hope I made the mail! Thanks Elka and everyone - it has been most
                  enjoyable.

                  Juliet






                  >From: "Elka Todeva" <Elka.Todeva@...>
                  >Reply-To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
                  >To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
                  >Subject: [TDSIG] Reflectivity FD final memo
                  >Date: Wed, 07 Dec 2005 01:10:39 -0500
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >Well, it�s Tuesday again and time to end the Reflectivity fielded
                  >discussion. Last week was either a very busy time of the year for people or
                  >the topic of reflectivity failed to generate wild enthusiasm. Many thanks
                  >to
                  >Jenny, Bob, Kalina, and Stephen for their participation. I will wrap things
                  >up referring again to two good overview articles on reflectivity:
                  >Rodgers, C. (2002) Defining reflection: Another look at John Dewey and
                  >reflective thinking, Teachers College Record. Vol. 4, Number 4, pp.
                  >842-866.
                  >Rodgers, C. (2002) Seeing student learning: Teacher change and the role of
                  >reflection, Harvard Educational Review. Vol. 72, Number 2, pp. 230-253.
                  >I have another topic for a fielded discussion that I would like to offer
                  >for
                  >exploration. I would like to ask the group about the timing first, however.
                  >What would work for people better � before or after the holidays? Please
                  >indicate your preferences and I will take it from there.
                  >Peace, elka

                  _________________________________________________________________
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                • Juliet du Mont
                  I have another topic for a fielded discussion that I would like to offer for exploration. I would like to ask the group about the timing first, however. What
                  Message 8 of 13 , Dec 7, 2005
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                    I have another topic for a fielded discussion that I would like to offer
                    for exploration. I would like to ask the group about the timing first,
                    however. What would work for people better � before or after the holidays?
                    Please indicate your preferences and I will take it from there.Peace, elka



                    Before the holidays would be fine.

                    Juliet

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                  • Krystal Jamet
                    I do too. ... I do too. Kevin Landry a écrit : I think the initial text has to be short and very focused for others to read and respond.     I have another
                    Message 9 of 13 , Dec 7, 2005
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                      I do too.

                      Kevin Landry a écrit :
                      I think the initial text has to be short and very focused for others to read and respond.
                       

                       

                      I have another topic for a fielded discussion that I would like to offer for exploration. I would like to ask the group about the timing first, however. What would work for people better – before or after the holidays? Please indicate your preferences and I will take it from there. Peace, elka




                      --
                      Kevin Landry, MA TESOL

                      Full time Lecturer, Dept. of Liberal Arts
                      KOTESOL Nominations and Elections Committee Chair  
                      Teacher Education & Development SIG Facilitator

                      Hongik University, Jochiwon Campus,
                      Dept. of Liberal Arts, San 300, Sinan-ri,
                      Jochiwon-eup, Yeongi-gun, Chungcheongnam-do
                      339-701. (W) 042-860-2692, (C) 016-373-1492,
                      Email: lklandry@...

                    • Simon Gill
                      I m an after-the-New Year voter. I really would have liked to play an active role in the last discussion, both out of collegial solidarity and because the
                      Message 10 of 13 , Dec 7, 2005
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                        I'm an after-the-New Year voter. I really would have liked to play an active
                        role in the last discussion, both out of collegial solidarity and because
                        the topic actually interested me, but I am just so busy right now that there
                        is no way I could do justice to even the most fascinating of topics.
                        January, however, looks like wide open prairie right now and so I would
                        definitely go for postponement till then. However, I realise my perspective
                        is a subjective one!

                        wbw

                        Simon Gill, Czech Republic
                      • CJ Nolan
                        I d vote for beginning after New Year s Day too; things are super-busy just now, whereas in January they will be merely very busy. ;- I d also like to put in
                        Message 11 of 13 , Dec 7, 2005
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                          I'd vote for beginning after New Year's Day too; things are super-busy just
                          now, whereas in January they will be merely very busy. ;->
                          I'd also like to put in a plea for the period allowed for discussion being
                          longer. The last discussion was truly interesting and I was just trying to
                          squeeze out some time in order to be able to add my comments when it ended.
                          Many thanks to all those who participated! A longer discussion period would
                          give us "lurkers" or silent readers a bigger window of opportunity to share.

                          Best,
                          Cinnamon (Spain)

                          >From: "Simon Gill" <pangill@...>
                          >Reply-To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
                          >To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
                          >Subject: [TDSIG] new topic
                          >Date: Wed, 07 Dec 2005 15:29:45 +0000
                          >
                          >I'm an after-the-New Year voter. I really would have liked to play an
                          >active
                          >role in the last discussion, both out of collegial solidarity and because
                          >the topic actually interested me, but I am just so busy right now that
                          >there
                          >is no way I could do justice to even the most fascinating of topics.
                          >January, however, looks like wide open prairie right now and so I would
                          >definitely go for postponement till then. However, I realise my perspective
                          >is a subjective one!
                          >
                          >wbw
                          >
                          >Simon Gill, Czech Republic
                          >
                          >

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                        • Elka Todeva
                          Hi, all. It’s almost midnight my time after a very long day of meetings and an evening presentation by a visiting professor but I decided to contact you and
                          Message 12 of 13 , Dec 7, 2005
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                            Hi, all. It’s almost midnight my time after a very long day of meetings and an evening presentation by a visiting professor but I decided to contact you and acknowledge all those who wrote during the last 24 hours (Kevin, Juliet, Cinnamon, Simon, Krystal, and Ingrid).

                             

                            It seems that we need some clarification on process. While generously coaching me, Colin left me with the impression that the TDSIG fielded discussions follow a well-established format - they last exactly a week and are initiated by a focus question and some reading. Since life is busy for everyone, it makes sense to me to have the discussions for a longer period, which will allow more people to participate. This may change a little the role of the moderator to make this workable but I do believe we can negotiate a process which will make the experience maximally enriching for the group. It will be helpful to hear from people who have served as moderators before and Kevin, who is the KOTESOL Teacher Education & Development SIG Facilitator. Maybe they had something in mind when they opted for the one-week format of the fielded discussions.

                             

                            It seems that most of those who responded would like to have our next fielded discussion after the holidays. I believe that this will be a wise thing to do since a lot of people travel during the holidays and this may make access to computers problematic at times. I can post the new topic next week, which will allow more reflection time before the actual discussion.

                             

                            I will finish by quoting an excerpt from Juliet’s much longer posting to the list:

                             

                            “As a teacher-trainer/developer I think what often causes me to pause and reflect is when I review recommendations I am about to make to others, and ask myself: do I actually do that myself? Reflectivity invites an objectifying of the teaching/learning process and necessarily of oneself within this.”

                              Good night everyone, elka

                          • colin mackenzie
                            That did go quickly, and was really interesting. I think many thanks go to Elka for so ably fielding the discussion and for agrreing to be our new moderator.
                            Message 13 of 13 , Dec 9, 2005
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                              That did go quickly, and was really interesting. I think many thanks go to Elka for so ably fielding the discussion and for agrreing to be our new moderator. 

                              As for the questions on format, it's really up to the participants. If we can have te discussion for a longer period then that would be great. Most discussion lists like this one have found that if there are no organised discussions then the list tends to flounder and, certainly within IATEFL, the idea of one week fielded discussions with the fielder committing to post round-ups and further questions every day has come about as a way of combatting this. Of course we always hope that the discussion will continue after the allocated week, the time limit is more to do with not being able to ask a discussion fielder to do daily round-ups for much more than a week, otherwise it would be difficult to get  people to volunteer. In this case our fielder is also our list moderator so, Elka, if you want to continue the discussion then go ahead (I might even manage to contribute).

                              And of course, if there's anyone out there who fancies fielding a discussion, for one week, one month, longer, then let Elka know.

                              All the best

                              Colin


                              On 8 Dec 2005, at 6:47, Elka Todeva wrote:


                              Hi, all. It’s almost midnight my time after a very long day of meetings and an evening presentation by a visiting professor but I decided to contact you and acknowledge all those who wrote during the last 24 hours (Kevin, Juliet, Cinnamon, Simon, Krystal, and Ingrid).
                               
                              It seems that we need some clarification on process. While generously coaching me, Colin left me with the impression that the TDSIG fielded discussions follow a well-established format - they last exactly a week and are initiated by a focus question and some reading. Since life is busy for everyone, it makes sense to me to have the discussions for a longer period, which will allow more people to participate. This may change a little the role of the moderator to make this workable but I do believe we can negotiate a process which will make the experience maximally enriching for the group. It will be helpful to hear from people who have served as moderators before and Kevin, who is the KOTESOL Teacher Education & Development SIG Facilitator. Maybe they had something in mind when they opted for the one-week format of the fielded discussions.
                               
                              It seems that most of those who responded would like to have our next fielded discussion after the holidays. I believe that this will be a wise thing to do since a lot of people travel during the holidays and this may make access to computers problematic at times. I can post the new topic next week, which will allow more reflection time before the actual discussion.
                               
                              I will finish by quoting an excerpt from Juliet’s much longer posting to the list:
                               
                              As a teacher-trainer/developer I think what often causes me to pause and reflect is when I review recommendations I am about to make to others, and ask myself: do I actually do that myself? Reflectivity invites an objectifying of the teaching/learning process and necessarily of oneself within this.”
                                Good night everyone, elka


                              Any views expressed on this list are of the person posting them. They are not necessarily views held or shared by IATEFL or the TDSIG.



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