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Re: [TDSIG] Fertile Ground

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  • Ingrid Gürtler
    Dear All, Something that has not yet been mentioned is the fertile ground that some of our own teachers provide / have provided. I can remember a few cases,
    Message 1 of 16 , May 12, 2005
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      Dear All,
      Something that has not yet been mentioned is the fertile ground that some of
      our own teachers provide / have provided. I can remember a few cases, both
      at school and at university where either the teacher´s pure enthusiasm (for
      us, for the subject, for teaching) or the way of going about it (for example
      inductively or socratically) provided me with something that I also wanted
      to bring into my own teaching, maybe changing a bit, using my style and
      learning through experience, but there was definitely a model, which I felt
      worth striving for and developing. (That was supposed to be an English
      sentence). I still find that not only participating in training seminars but
      observing the trainer go about their work is quite a developmental source
      for me. At this stage in my "career" this could probably fall under peer
      observation. What for me definitely ranks as unfertile are situations - such
      as the one in which I now find myself - where the focus on quality
      management and the pressure to document and assess seems to take me away
      from personal development. Not to be misunderstood - I am all in favour of
      good quality and quality management - there is a lot to learn there. At the
      moment, however, the technocratic side is so overpowering that the
      enthusiasm and the energy that go with trying out new angles, making new
      discoveries are being suffocated. I have the image of those really unruly
      weeds that can take over a garden - some even quite beautiful. However, when
      you pull those out you discover all the beautiful, smaller? plants and
      flowers down below that are not getting enough space to breath.
      Ingrid
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: colin mackenzie <colin.mackenzie@...>
      To: <TDSIG@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, May 31, 2005 10:35 PM
      Subject: Re: [TDSIG] Fertile Ground


      > Dear All
      >
      > I think that the great thing about my first school was not that they
      > expected me to be professional. There didn't seem to be any pressure
      > to come up to a particular standard and so there was little anxiety
      > (beyond WHAT AM I GOING TO DO TODAY!!!!) and no feeling of authority.
      > It was more the acceptance that I was a professional that gave great
      > confidence. This acceptance was from both colleagues and students. I do
      > agree with Howard's point that very professional places can be very
      > scary for people with just four weeks' training.
      >
      > HOWARD:
      > > Colin, in your post you say ".**we** organised a five-week period of
      > > intensive observation." - who's the 'we' there, and how did this come
      > > about?
      >
      > COLIN:
      > The "we" was me. I'd taken over as Head of Studies in January and got
      > through my first hectic Summer. The principal was the ex HoS and very
      > supportive of teachers and TD. Neither of us knew that I was meant to
      > be on a two-thirds teaching load and I had a lot of spare time. I think
      > teacher resistance was broken down partly because I put forward the
      > proposal in a staff meeting and we had a lot of discussion about it and
      > mainly because each week one teacher got four or five two hour sessions
      > where instead of teaching they watch a colleague for 50 minutes and
      > then reflected on what they'd seen for another 50 minutes - or
      > alternatively read the paper. The feedback they were asked to give was
      > very much along the lines of "I could do that in my lesson" or "what
      > gave you the idea for that?" though they were provided with focussed
      > observation tasks sheets used at the request of the observee. I taught
      > the teachers class during these periods, which was great for me as in
      > five weeks I taught all the classes in the school and so got to know
      > all the students. As I said before, the fact that so much observation
      > was going on on people saw so many different styles, really opened up
      > staffroom discussion.
      >
      >
      >
      > HOWARD:
      > > does anyone else out there think that one thing that rather militates
      > > against development is that coursebooks
      > > are getting too good?
      >
      > COLIN:
      > You could have a point there. But on the other hand, much of what I
      > learnt in my first two years I learnt from coursebooks, trying things
      > out, rejecting them, adapting them.
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      > Any views expressed on this list are of the person posting them. They are
      not necessarily views held or shared by IATEFL or the TDSIG.
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Howard Smith
      Firstly, sorry no round up yesterday. I was up to my knees in what makes ground extremely fertile and still haven t fully extricated myself. However, onwards
      Message 2 of 16 , Jun 2, 2005
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        Firstly, sorry no round up yesterday. I was up to my knees in what makes
        ground extremely fertile and still haven't fully extricated myself.



        However, onwards and upwards.



        Colin, thanks for the explanation of how you organised the observation thing
        - I might try it, though I still worry that when DoSs make 'suggestions'
        teachers can feel pressured (however genuinely the suggestion is made). This
        said I take your earlier point about management being 'close to the
        chalkface': there can be little more dispiriting than seeing an academic
        manager who clearly hates teaching and will do anything not to have to enter
        the classroom.



        I also found Krystal's comments on feeling uncomfortable in the staffroom,
        well.not weird.but certainly coming from somewhere other than where I have
        been. I think that one of the major developmental influences in my own
        teaching has been the staffroom both in terms of ideas shared and of
        providing role models to aspire to. I think that seeing older (or at least
        more experienced) teachers who are still enthusiastic and energised by
        teaching, and still developing and experimenting was one of the things that
        drove me to want to be such a person in my own dotage (and not the chap
        Colin described).



        I liked Ingrid's comments about the 'technocratic side' of things



        (not ignoring the remarks about training/inset sessions, but to my mind they
        are most successful if/when the teachers attending are already 'developers'.
        Thinking about that though, I suppose it could be the case that a single
        session could ignite the desire - wasn't the case with me, but has anyone
        had experience of 'damascene training?') Oops. That parenthesis has turned
        into a paragraph on its own.



        I agree that, in tandem with what I would identify as a growing
        professionalism in ELT (not that it never existed before) and what I hope is
        a growing recognition of that professionalism there is a growing
        beaurocratisation. We are in the same boat as many other professions where
        the paperwork seems to be getting in the way of doing the job, and where
        (some) managers can begin to view the production of the relevant
        data/evidence as more important than the activity itself. As an example;
        during a recent British Council inspection I mentioned that I was keen for
        staff to observe each other and did what I could to facilitate this and
        that, though it had happened on occasion, it wasn't as widespread as I would
        like. The inspectors asked if I had any documentation for the observations
        that had taken place. I hadn't and said I'd try to get it in place. The
        upshot? I've had to ask teachers to let me know if they arrange to observe
        each other, so I can keep records. The cold, dead hand of management
        intrudes once again into what could/should be a collegiate matter. And we
        always need to preface comments like that with "of course, I'm all in favour
        of quality control" - and of course we are. Any more thoughts on this? From
        rants to (more usefully) suggestions about how to live with, perhaps even
        learn to love, some of this process?





        I enjoyed Bob's comments, and agree heartily that stimulating colleagues is
        probably the single most inspiring thing you can have. I don't think there's
        much in the way of salt marshes round Oxford, but I'll see what I can do





        Anyway, I'll be back in touch soon.





        Howard











        Oxford House College

        15 King Edward St.

        Oxford

        OX1 4HT



        Tel: +44 (0) 1865 724032

        Fax: +44 (0) 1865 727269

        email: howard@...





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Ranivoarisoa Aimée Virginie
        Dear colleagues! Thanks a lot for your explanations and your sharing which I always enjoy though very often I am a lost ie I don t get some of the points. And
        Message 3 of 16 , Jun 2, 2005
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          Dear colleagues!

          Thanks a lot for your explanations and your sharing which I always enjoy though very often I am a lost ie I don't get some of the points. And I am trying to see why as a language teacher, after 17 years of experiences, I feel I am not satisfied .I feel that I am not yet a professional because I often don't understand some if not alot of the points our colleagues say.I just see a lot of problems needing different approaches for each students. My only satisfaction is to see that most of my students appreciate my teaching as I otfen focus on student's centerdness.And they can practice too!
          Another points also: I dislike being in the teachers'room as often, only complaints and problems are talked about. I can say, that being in the classroom is a tough job of interaction and needs a good skill of management.Listening to student is important but very often it comes to a noisy classs as we here in Madagascar we have an average number of 60 students in one class with 6 classes for me.

          Ok, again thanks a lot and always happy to read from you all.

          Ranivoarisoa A.Virginie
          English teacher at a Lycée


          Howard Smith <howard@...> a écrit :
          Firstly, sorry no round up yesterday. I was up to my knees in what makes
          ground extremely fertile and still haven't fully extricated myself.



          However, onwards and upwards.



          Colin, thanks for the explanation of how you organised the observation thing
          - I might try it, though I still worry that when DoSs make 'suggestions'
          teachers can feel pressured (however genuinely the suggestion is made). This
          said I take your earlier point about management being 'close to the
          chalkface': there can be little more dispiriting than seeing an academic
          manager who clearly hates teaching and will do anything not to have to enter
          the classroom.



          I also found Krystal's comments on feeling uncomfortable in the staffroom,
          well.not weird.but certainly coming from somewhere other than where I have
          been. I think that one of the major developmental influences in my own
          teaching has been the staffroom both in terms of ideas shared and of
          providing role models to aspire to. I think that seeing older (or at least
          more experienced) teachers who are still enthusiastic and energised by
          teaching, and still developing and experimenting was one of the things that
          drove me to want to be such a person in my own dotage (and not the chap
          Colin described).



          I liked Ingrid's comments about the 'technocratic side' of things



          (not ignoring the remarks about training/inset sessions, but to my mind they
          are most successful if/when the teachers attending are already 'developers'.
          Thinking about that though, I suppose it could be the case that a single
          session could ignite the desire - wasn't the case with me, but has anyone
          had experience of 'damascene training?') Oops. That parenthesis has turned
          into a paragraph on its own.



          I agree that, in tandem with what I would identify as a growing
          professionalism in ELT (not that it never existed before) and what I hope is
          a growing recognition of that professionalism there is a growing
          beaurocratisation. We are in the same boat as many other professions where
          the paperwork seems to be getting in the way of doing the job, and where
          (some) managers can begin to view the production of the relevant
          data/evidence as more important than the activity itself. As an example;
          during a recent British Council inspection I mentioned that I was keen for
          staff to observe each other and did what I could to facilitate this and
          that, though it had happened on occasion, it wasn't as widespread as I would
          like. The inspectors asked if I had any documentation for the observations
          that had taken place. I hadn't and said I'd try to get it in place. The
          upshot? I've had to ask teachers to let me know if they arrange to observe
          each other, so I can keep records. The cold, dead hand of management
          intrudes once again into what could/should be a collegiate matter. And we
          always need to preface comments like that with "of course, I'm all in favour
          of quality control" - and of course we are. Any more thoughts on this? From
          rants to (more usefully) suggestions about how to live with, perhaps even
          learn to love, some of this process?





          I enjoyed Bob's comments, and agree heartily that stimulating colleagues is
          probably the single most inspiring thing you can have. I don't think there's
          much in the way of salt marshes round Oxford, but I'll see what I can do





          Anyway, I'll be back in touch soon.





          Howard











          Oxford House College

          15 King Edward St.

          Oxford

          OX1 4HT



          Tel: +44 (0) 1865 724032

          Fax: +44 (0) 1865 727269

          email: howard@...





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



          Any views expressed on this list are of the person posting them. They are not necessarily views held or shared by IATEFL or the TDSIG.



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        • Adrian Tennant
          Mmm, Lots of talk about initial experinces (mostly positive), formative experience from school - i.e good teachers (although I wonder how many people, like
          Message 4 of 16 , Jun 2, 2005
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            Mmm,

            Lots of talk about initial experinces (mostly positive), formative
            experience from school - i.e good teachers (although I wonder how many
            people, like me, have been influenced more by poor/bad teachers?).

            But for me, fertile ground is in the mind.

            Unless the person wants to develop, they won't - whatever the conditions.

            I've worked in places with fantastic TD programs and yet there have been
            people working at the same places who have stagnated so much it smelt (like
            a swamp!).

            On the other hand, I've worked in some places where TD stood for Total
            disregard (for training of any kind) and yet I've manaed to develop and so
            have others around me.

            ???

            Adrian


            --------------------------------------------------------------------------------



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • colin mackenzie
            I agree with Adrian, fertile ground is in the mind, but the mind can be affected by the environment around it, which is probably why we have been saying that
            Message 5 of 16 , Jun 2, 2005
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              I agree with Adrian, fertile ground is in the mind, but the mind can be
              affected by the environment around it, which is probably why we have
              been saying that the formative years are very important. Of course
              there are the mental swam dwellers who are beyond being influenced, and
              at the other end the (perhaps equally irritating and rather rarer)
              people who can get the best from whatever environment they are in, but
              most of us are in the middle ground, follow the herd instinct and can
              benefit greatly from a more development friendly atmosphere.

              Colin
              On 2 Jun 2005, at 9:59, Adrian Tennant wrote:

              > � Mmm,
              >
              > � Lots of talk about initial experinces (mostly positive), formative
              > experience from school� - i.e good teachers (although I wonder how
              > many
              > people, like me, have been influenced more by poor/bad teachers?).
              >
              > � But for me, fertile ground is in the mind.
              >
              > � Unless the person wants to develop, they won't - whatever the
              > conditions.
              >
              > � I've worked in places with fantastic TD programs and yet there have
              > been
              > people working at the same places who have stagnated so much it smelt
              > (like
              > a swamp!).
              >
              > � On the other hand, I've worked in some places where TD stood for
              > Total
              > disregard (for training of any kind) and yet I've manaed to develop
              > and so
              > have others around me.
              >
              > � ???
              >
              > � Adrian
              >
              >
              >
              > -----------------------------------------------------------------------
              > ---------
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >
              > Any views expressed on this list are of the person posting them. They
              > are not necessarily views held or shared by IATEFL or the TDSIG.
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              > � To visit your group on the web, go to:
              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TDSIG/
              > �
              > � To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > TDSIG-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > �
              > � Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
              > Service.
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Krystal Jamet
              ... Thanks for your interest and attention! -Krystal ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Message 6 of 16 , Jun 2, 2005
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                >
                >
                >KRYSTAL:
                >
                >
                >>I admit I spend as little time as possible in the staffroom. I'm at
                >>least as anxious going into the staffroom as I am starting a new
                >>group. Weird, huh?
                >>
                >>
                >
                >COLIN:
                >Krystal, I do find that a little wierd, is it because of the staffroom
                >atmosphere, the discussions that go on, something else?
                >
                >
                >Well Colin, thank you for asking. I think it has to do with how much free time I have and what to do with it. It's true yesterday I went through the staff room to do my pay and did have a nice visit with 2-3 other teachers about teaching. It started off however with a confused ramble (from the third teacher) directed at me seemingly about when someone stopped teaching on Wednesdays and how old another teacher's children were. I just said(hopefully nicely, and as I was photocopying multiple documents), 'I really don't know what you're talking about', then telling her the age of my child seemed to be the missing information. I still endured the 'student with a problem and won't agree with anything' banter and those people 'who just don't want to learn'.
                >
                >It was nice when I was a dos because teachers like that don't say anything when you're around (I guess). But boom, take away the fear factor of hierarchy and that layer of veneer is gone. Ignorance is bliss. Why are they there?
                >
                >I'm intrigued about the idea of a staff social. Perhaps I'll mention it to the branch director and office manager/dos. Open topics, unlimited drinks and designated driver? The topic 'professionalism' is quite recurrent where I work now. Another sensitive subject is whether working with songs/music is professional, and another is working without books. I actually 'inspired' one teacher to look up a Thornbury article in the Guardian on it that I'd read.
                >
                >
                Thanks for your interest and attention!
                -Krystal

                >
                >
                >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >
                >Any views expressed on this list are of the person posting them. They are not necessarily views held or shared by IATEFL or the TDSIG.
                >Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Juliet du Mont
                Songs/music, Krystal? How about movement as a major tool for teaching language? I d be curious how your colleagues would react to that idea! Juliet ...
                Message 7 of 16 , Jun 3, 2005
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                  Songs/music, Krystal? How about movement as a major tool for teaching
                  language? I'd be curious how your colleagues would react to that idea!

                  Juliet

                  >From: Krystal Jamet <krystal.jamet@...>
                  >Reply-To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
                  >To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
                  >Subject: Re: [TDSIG] Fertile Ground
                  >Date: Thu, 02 Jun 2005 22:36:40 +0200
                  >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >KRYSTAL:
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >>I admit I spend as little time as possible in the staffroom. I'm at
                  > >>least as anxious going into the staffroom as I am starting a new
                  > >>group. Weird, huh?
                  > >>
                  > >>
                  > >
                  > >COLIN:
                  > >Krystal, I do find that a little wierd, is it because of the staffroom
                  > >atmosphere, the discussions that go on, something else?
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >Well Colin, thank you for asking. I think it has to do with how much free
                  >time I have and what to do with it. It's true yesterday I went through the
                  >staff room to do my pay and did have a nice visit with 2-3 other teachers
                  >about teaching. It started off however with a confused ramble (from the
                  >third teacher) directed at me seemingly about when someone stopped teaching
                  >on Wednesdays and how old another teacher's children were. I just
                  >said(hopefully nicely, and as I was photocopying multiple documents), 'I
                  >really don't know what you're talking about', then telling her the age of
                  >my child seemed to be the missing information. I still endured the 'student
                  >with a problem and won't agree with anything' banter and those people 'who
                  >just don't want to learn'.
                  > >
                  > >It was nice when I was a dos because teachers like that don't say
                  >anything when you're around (I guess). But boom, take away the fear factor
                  >of hierarchy and that layer of veneer is gone. Ignorance is bliss. Why are
                  >they there?
                  > >
                  > >I'm intrigued about the idea of a staff social. Perhaps I'll mention it
                  >to the branch director and office manager/dos. Open topics, unlimited
                  >drinks and designated driver? The topic 'professionalism' is quite
                  >recurrent where I work now. Another sensitive subject is whether working
                  >with songs/music is professional, and another is working without books. I
                  >actually 'inspired' one teacher to look up a Thornbury article in the
                  >Guardian on it that I'd read.
                  > >
                  > >
                  >Thanks for your interest and attention!
                  >-Krystal
                  >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >Any views expressed on this list are of the person posting them. They are
                  >not necessarily views held or shared by IATEFL or the TDSIG.
                  > >Yahoo! Groups Links
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >

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                • Krystal Jamet
                  How would you do movement in a business english class Juliet? My one colleague gets people to mime different actions verbs in front of the others. I suspect
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jun 3, 2005
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                    How would you do movement in a business english class Juliet?


                    My one colleague gets people to mime different actions verbs in front of
                    the others. I suspect he also has them mime swimming and water polo
                    warm-ups, but he's too sheepish to let on. There are just TOO MANY
                    guffaws coming out of his class for physicality not to be a part of it.
                    And he had the stick drawings too ready to lend me when I told him I was
                    swimming 3 times a week.


                    I, personally, move people all around the Visitor Center at the physics
                    lab classroom I work in to do unreheared (no intitial input processing
                    phase thank you willis, skehan - it's more get them moving and doing
                    something, not sitting on their 'bums' and listening to the teacher rant
                    on in the 'right way' before unleashing the beast) presentations of
                    measurment devices used during school visits, descriptions of prototypes
                    stocked there. Sometimes these poor learners (com directors, cad
                    designers, crystallography phd's) have to do these talks off-the-cuff at
                    the city science center.


                    Is that movement as a major tool for teaching language? Getting them out
                    of the chair, not looking at me, or each other and instead moving into
                    different rooms, around different pieces of equipment, interacting with
                    those objects using english in description.
                    Do you use movement in teaching english? How do you do it? What do you
                    do it for?
                    How would you show other teachers how to do it? What would it be good for?
                    -Krystal

                    >Songs/music, Krystal? How about movement as a major tool for teaching
                    >language? I'd be curious how your colleagues would react to that idea!
                    >
                    >Juliet
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >>From: Krystal Jamet <krystal.jamet@...>
                    >>Reply-To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
                    >>To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
                    >>Subject: Re: [TDSIG] Fertile Ground
                    >>Date: Thu, 02 Jun 2005 22:36:40 +0200
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>>KRYSTAL:
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>>I admit I spend as little time as possible in the staffroom. I'm at
                    >>>>least as anxious going into the staffroom as I am starting a new
                    >>>>group. Weird, huh?
                    >>>>
                    >>>>
                    >>>>
                    >>>>
                    >>>COLIN:
                    >>>Krystal, I do find that a little wierd, is it because of the staffroom
                    >>>atmosphere, the discussions that go on, something else?
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>Well Colin, thank you for asking. I think it has to do with how much free
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>time I have and what to do with it. It's true yesterday I went through the
                    >>staff room to do my pay and did have a nice visit with 2-3 other teachers
                    >>about teaching. It started off however with a confused ramble (from the
                    >>third teacher) directed at me seemingly about when someone stopped teaching
                    >>on Wednesdays and how old another teacher's children were. I just
                    >>said(hopefully nicely, and as I was photocopying multiple documents), 'I
                    >>really don't know what you're talking about', then telling her the age of
                    >>my child seemed to be the missing information. I still endured the 'student
                    >>with a problem and won't agree with anything' banter and those people 'who
                    >>just don't want to learn'.
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>>It was nice when I was a dos because teachers like that don't say
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>anything when you're around (I guess). But boom, take away the fear factor
                    >>of hierarchy and that layer of veneer is gone. Ignorance is bliss. Why are
                    >>they there?
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>>I'm intrigued about the idea of a staff social. Perhaps I'll mention it
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>to the branch director and office manager/dos. Open topics, unlimited
                    >>drinks and designated driver? The topic 'professionalism' is quite
                    >>recurrent where I work now. Another sensitive subject is whether working
                    >>with songs/music is professional, and another is working without books. I
                    >>actually 'inspired' one teacher to look up a Thornbury article in the
                    >>Guardian on it that I'd read.
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>Thanks for your interest and attention!
                    >>-Krystal
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>>[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>Any views expressed on this list are of the person posting them. They are
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>not necessarily views held or shared by IATEFL or the TDSIG.
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>>Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>
                    >>[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >
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                  • Juliet du Mont
                    Krystal, We ve zoomed off topic here - my fault! I lll reply to your personal email. Juliet ...
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jun 4, 2005
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                      Krystal,

                      We've zoomed off topic here - my fault! I'lll reply to your personal email.

                      Juliet

                      >From: Krystal Jamet <krystal.jamet@...>
                      >Reply-To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
                      >To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
                      >Subject: Re: [TDSIG] Shaky Ground
                      >Date: Fri, 03 Jun 2005 21:00:08 +0200
                      >
                      >How would you do movement in a business english class Juliet?
                      >
                      >
                      >My one colleague gets people to mime different actions verbs in front of
                      >the others. I suspect he also has them mime swimming and water polo
                      >warm-ups, but he's too sheepish to let on. There are just TOO MANY
                      >guffaws coming out of his class for physicality not to be a part of it.
                      >And he had the stick drawings too ready to lend me when I told him I was
                      >swimming 3 times a week.
                      >
                      >
                      >I, personally, move people all around the Visitor Center at the physics
                      >lab classroom I work in to do unreheared (no intitial input processing
                      >phase thank you willis, skehan - it's more get them moving and doing
                      >something, not sitting on their 'bums' and listening to the teacher rant
                      >on in the 'right way' before unleashing the beast) presentations of
                      >measurment devices used during school visits, descriptions of prototypes
                      >stocked there. Sometimes these poor learners (com directors, cad
                      >designers, crystallography phd's) have to do these talks off-the-cuff at
                      >the city science center.
                      >
                      >
                      >Is that movement as a major tool for teaching language? Getting them out
                      >of the chair, not looking at me, or each other and instead moving into
                      >different rooms, around different pieces of equipment, interacting with
                      >those objects using english in description.
                      >Do you use movement in teaching english? How do you do it? What do you
                      >do it for?
                      >How would you show other teachers how to do it? What would it be good for?
                      >-Krystal
                      >
                      > >Songs/music, Krystal? How about movement as a major tool for teaching
                      > >language? I'd be curious how your colleagues would react to that idea!
                      > >
                      > >Juliet
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >>From: Krystal Jamet <krystal.jamet@...>
                      > >>Reply-To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
                      > >>To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
                      > >>Subject: Re: [TDSIG] Fertile Ground
                      > >>Date: Thu, 02 Jun 2005 22:36:40 +0200
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >>>KRYSTAL:
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>>>I admit I spend as little time as possible in the staffroom. I'm at
                      > >>>>least as anxious going into the staffroom as I am starting a new
                      > >>>>group. Weird, huh?
                      > >>>>
                      > >>>>
                      > >>>>
                      > >>>>
                      > >>>COLIN:
                      > >>>Krystal, I do find that a little wierd, is it because of the staffroom
                      > >>>atmosphere, the discussions that go on, something else?
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>>Well Colin, thank you for asking. I think it has to do with how much
                      >free
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>time I have and what to do with it. It's true yesterday I went through
                      >the
                      > >>staff room to do my pay and did have a nice visit with 2-3 other
                      >teachers
                      > >>about teaching. It started off however with a confused ramble (from the
                      > >>third teacher) directed at me seemingly about when someone stopped
                      >teaching
                      > >>on Wednesdays and how old another teacher's children were. I just
                      > >>said(hopefully nicely, and as I was photocopying multiple documents), 'I
                      > >>really don't know what you're talking about', then telling her the age
                      >of
                      > >>my child seemed to be the missing information. I still endured the
                      >'student
                      > >>with a problem and won't agree with anything' banter and those people
                      >'who
                      > >>just don't want to learn'.
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >>>It was nice when I was a dos because teachers like that don't say
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>anything when you're around (I guess). But boom, take away the fear
                      >factor
                      > >>of hierarchy and that layer of veneer is gone. Ignorance is bliss. Why
                      >are
                      > >>they there?
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >>>I'm intrigued about the idea of a staff social. Perhaps I'll mention it
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>to the branch director and office manager/dos. Open topics, unlimited
                      > >>drinks and designated driver? The topic 'professionalism' is quite
                      > >>recurrent where I work now. Another sensitive subject is whether
                      >working
                      > >>with songs/music is professional, and another is working without books.
                      >I
                      > >>actually 'inspired' one teacher to look up a Thornbury article in the
                      > >>Guardian on it that I'd read.
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>Thanks for your interest and attention!
                      > >>-Krystal
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >>>[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>>Any views expressed on this list are of the person posting them. They
                      >are
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>not necessarily views held or shared by IATEFL or the TDSIG.
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >>>Yahoo! Groups Links
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>
                      > >>[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >
                      > >_________________________________________________________________
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                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >Any views expressed on this list are of the person posting them. They are
                      >not necessarily views held or shared by IATEFL or the TDSIG.
                      > >Yahoo! Groups Links
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
                      >
                      >

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