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News: Need Help With Grammar?

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  • Rodney Tan Chai Whatt
    Dear All, Even though we may be proficient users of the English language, not many of us have the benefit of learning all the rules of the English language. It
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 11, 2005
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      Dear All,

      Even though we may be proficient users of the English language, not many of
      us have the benefit of learning all the rules of the English language.

      It is confusing at times and I'm sometimes lost for words when I'm asked to
      explain certain rules of the English Language (I was educated in the
      Communicative & the Audio Lingual Method).

      Well, look no further as I've found a mailing list called Acu_Write that
      sends the explanations right into your mailbox. Subscribe to it if you find
      it useful. The subscribe email is right at the bottom of the article.

      Best regards,

      Rodney Tan Chai Whatt
      Malaysia
      --------------------------------------------------------
      Acu-Write

      January 10, 2005 Vol. 5, No. 1

      *****************************************************************

      If you're a new subscriber (or a long-time subscriber who needs a
      reminder), _Acu-Write_ is no longer a weekly publication. We will
      attempt to publish a couple of issues a month.

      * * *

      Upcoming Conferences: NABE in San Antonio, CABE in Los Angeles

      Hands-On English is currently being piloted with intermediate
      English learners in the Orange (CA) Unified School District.
      Teachers' initial response is enthusiastic.

      In order to introduce these materials to more educators who work
      with people learning English as a subsequent language, Fran will
      be exhibiting at the following conferences:

      National Association of Bilingual Educators (NABE), San Antonio,
      January 19-22, 2005

      California Association of Bilingual Educators (CABE), Los
      Angeles, February 23-26, 2005

      If you know people who are involved in bilingual education,
      please suggest that they consider Hands-On English for their
      students.

      * * *

      I. Words: anytime / any time

      "Anytime" is an adverb (modifying a verb). It means "at any
      time," "whenever," or "always":
      Drop by to visit me anytime. [answers the adverb question "when"]
      Anytime you need help, just call on me. ["whenever"]

      You might have noticed "any time" in the definition of "anytime"
      above. This phrase comprises a noun and an adjective:
      Do you have any time to help me with my project? [Noun is needed
      to serve as the direct object of "do have."]
      I'll be glad to help you at any time. [Noun is needed to serve as
      the object of the preposition "at."]

      People tend to use the solid form ("anytime") more often than it
      is appropriate. If you are using "anytime," ask yourself whether
      an adverb works in that spot. In the examples above, we noticed
      that a noun was needed to serve as an object.

      _Hands-On English_ includes additional word pairs and more than
      200 word parts to help you expand your vocabulary exponentially.
      Learn more -- and place your order -- at
      http://www.GrammarAndMore.com/product/hoe.htm


      II. Mechanics: Punctuating sentences with "however"

      To correctly punctuate sentences using "however," you must
      first understand what makes up an independent clause. An
      independent clause (also known as a "simple sentence") is a
      group of words containing a subject (noun or pronoun) and a
      predicate (verb), and expressing a complete thought.

      "However" -- whether it appears at the beginning, at the end,
      or in the middle of an independent clause -- is set off by
      commas. Notice that each of these sentences would be complete
      even if "however" were deleted; the relationship between the
      ideas simply would not be shown:
      I saw the film. However, I did not understand it.
      I saw the film. I did not understand it, however.
      Alex enjoyed the film. I, however, did not understand it.

      A common error involving the use of "however" occurs when the
      word appears between two independent clauses with a comma
      before it and after it. This punctuation is not strong enough,
      however, since a comma is not strong enough to separate two
      independent clauses; a period or semicolon is needed:
      Incorrect: I saw the film, however, I did not understand it.

      The preceding example has two independent clauses: "I saw the
      film" and "I did not understand it." Stronger punctuation is
      needed to separate them. A period can be used, as in the first
      example above; a semicolon is also appropriate:
      I saw the film; however, I did not understand it.

      When "however" has a comma before it and after it, you should
      be able to remove "however" and be left with one simple
      sentence. Study additional correct examples:
      The temperature was high. However, the humidity was low.
      The temperature was high; however, the humidity was low.
      The temperature was high; the humidity, however, was low.

      Do you think you don't need _Hands-On English_ because you
      subscribe to _Acu-Write_? Think again! Each publication includes
      material that the other does not. In addition, _Hands-On English_
      makes grammar visual and puts a wealth of information at your
      fingertips so that you can quickly find what you need to know
      about grammar, usage, capitalization, punctuation, spelling, and
      more. Get details -- and place your order -- at
      http://www.GrammarAndMore.com/product/hoe.htm

      Do you have a question that you would like to have answered in
      _Acu-Write_? mailto:Acu-Write@... .

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      If you appreciate these tips, please forward this message to
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      You can access archived issues of _Acu-Write_ (through May 5,
      2003) at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Acu-Write .
      Although this archive is not indexed, the "search" feature will
      help you find articles on a particular topic.

      Are you a connoisseur of English? Consider subscribing to
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      _LinguaPhile_ includes book reviews, vocabulary expanders,
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      © 2005 Fran Santoro Hamilton

      Fran Hamilton
      Author of _Hands-On English_
      Providing Quick Access to English Fundamentals
      http://www.GrammarAndMore.com

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