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Teacher Development WebSite

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  • Rodney Tan Chai Whatt
    Dear Fellow TD SIG, There is a website dedicated to Teacher Development and they also issue a regular email newsletter called The Weekly Teaching Tip with an
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 1, 2004
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      Dear Fellow TD SIG,

      There is a website dedicated to Teacher Development and they also issue a regular email newsletter called The Weekly Teaching Tip with an interesting article that would be of practical use to us. They also provide links to other relevant articles on their website.

      www.developingteachers.com


      Best regards,

      Rodney Tan
      Malaysia


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Graham S Hall
      Hi all Thanks for that Rodney. I ev just had a very quick look and the site has a whole range of things there, from tips to newsletters. it also has a range of
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 1, 2004
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        Hi all

        Thanks for that Rodney. I'ev just had a very quick look and the site has a
        whole range of things there, from tips to newsletters. it also has a range
        of articles provided by some fairly familiar names that people might want to
        dip into. If there are any that people are particulalrly keen on, just let
        us know.

        Does anyone else know of any sites or online articles that may be of
        interest to this discussion group (and beyond)? If so, just let us know and
        I could either collate them as a useful links site or we use them as
        starting in points for sharing opinions.

        Thanks

        Graham

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Rodney Tan Chai Whatt [mailto:rodt@...]
        Sent: 01 November 2004 15:01
        To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [TDSIG] Teacher Development WebSite


        Dear Fellow TD SIG,

        There is a website dedicated to Teacher Development and they also issue a
        regular email newsletter called The Weekly Teaching Tip with an interesting
        article that would be of practical use to us. They also provide links to
        other relevant articles on their website.

        www.developingteachers.com


        Best regards,

        Rodney Tan
        Malaysia


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



        Any views expressed on this list are of the person posting them. They are
        not necessarily views held or shared by IATEFL or the TDSIG.



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      • Landry
        Question: How would you characterize current approaches to the preparation of language teachers? Dr Richards Responds: In the past, learning to teach English
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 1, 2004
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          Question:
          How would you characterize current approaches to the preparation of language teachers?
          Dr Richards Responds:
          In the past, learning to teach English as a second language was a process of acquiring a body of knowledge and skills from an external source, i.e. from experts. It was a kind of top-down process based on modeling good practices, the practices themselves built around a standard or recognized teaching method. Becoming a language teacher meant acquiring a set of discrete skills - lesson planning, techniques for presenting and practicing new teaching points and for teaching the four skills. The approach that dominated graduate courses at this time consisted of a limited diet of theory courses, mainly confined to linguistics (syntax, morphology, semantics), phonetics, English grammar and sometimes literature, plus the study of methodology.

          In the last 10 years or so a sub-field of language teaching has emerged now known as second language teacher education (Roberts, 1998). This refers to the study of the theory and practice of teacher development for language teachers. In the last thirty years there has also developed a substantial industry devoted to providing language teachers with professional training and qualifications. The knowledge base of language teaching has also expanded substantially although there are still significant differences of opinion concerning what the essential knowledge base of language teaching consists of. Experts arrive at different answers to questions such as the following:

          Is language teaching a branch of applied linguistics or a branch of education?
          How much linguistics do teachers need to know and whose linguistic theories are most relevant?
          What are the essential subjects in a pre-service or in-service curriculum for language teachers?
          Do teachers need to know how to carry out research? If so, what kind of research?

          Due to this lack of consensus as to the theoretical basis for language teaching, the kind of professional preparation teachers may receive varies considerably from country to country or even from institution to institution within a country, as a comparison of MA TESOL degrees in Canada and the United States reveals.

          There has been a marked shift in our understanding of what we mean by teacher preparation. In the past the idea of teacher training dominated but beginning in the 1990s teacher development assumed a more central role (Richards 1998). Teacher training involves processes of the following kind:

          Understanding basic concepts and principles as a prerequisite for applying them to teaching
          Expanding one�s repertoire of routines, skills and strategies
          Trying out new strategies in the classroom
          Monitoring oneself and getting feedback from others on one�s practice

          Teacher development serves a longer-term goal and seeks to facilitate growth of the teacher�s general understanding of teaching and of himself or herself as a teacher. It often involves examining different dimensions of one�s own practice as a basis for reflective review, and can hence be seen as �bottom-up�. The following are examples of goals from a development perspective:

          Understanding how the process of second language development occurs
          Understanding how teachers� roles change according to the kind of learners he or she is teaching
          Understanding the kinds of decision-making that occurs during lessons
          Reviewing one�s own theories and principles of language teaching
          Developing an understanding of different styles of teaching
          Determining learners� perceptions of classroom activities
          Acquiring the skills of a mentor

          Comparing the two perspectives on teacher education Freeman observed
          (Freeman 1982, 21-22):

          Training deals with building specific teaching skills: how to sequence a lesson or how to teach a dialogue, for instance. Development, on the other hand, focuses on the individual teacher � on the process of reflection, examination, and change which can lead to doing a better job and to personal growth and professional growth. These two concepts assume different views of teaching and the teacher. Training assumes that teaching is a finite skill, one which can be acquired and mastered. The teacher then learns to teach in the same way s/he learned to tie shoes or to ride a bicycle. Development assumes that teaching is a constantly evolving process of growth and change. It is an expansion of skills and understanding, one in which the teacher is responsible for the process in much the same way students are for learning a language.

          Teacher development is not seen as a one-off thing but a continuous process. The teacher is engaged in exploring his or her own teaching through reflective teaching in a collaborative process together with learners and colleagues. Learning from examining one�s own teaching, from carrying out classroom research, from creating teaching portfolios, from interacting with colleagues through critical friendships, mentoring and participating in teacher networks, are all regarded as ways in which teachers can acquire new skills and knowledge. This reflects the prevailing educational philosophy of constructivism which is currently popular in education including language teacher education: knowledge is actively constructed and not passively received. A constructive view of teaching involves teachers in making their own sense of their own classrooms and taking on the role of a reflective practitioner.




          home
          Copyright 2002-2004 Jack C. Richards


          Does anyone else know of any sites or online articles that may be of
          interest to this discussion group (and beyond)? If so, just let us know and
          I could either collate them as a useful links site or we use them as
          starting in points for sharing opinions.

          Thanks

          Graham



          K. Landry
          Senior English Lecturer

          Center for International Students and Scholars
          Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST)
          1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju, 500-712
          Republic of Korea

          office 062 970 2068
          fax 062 970 2099

          LKLANDRY2002@...
          Landry@...


          ---------------------------------
          Post your free ad now! Yahoo! Canada Personals


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Adrian Tennant
          Hi Graham, People might find some useful / interesting links here. http://www.teacherdevelopment.net/Books/webguides/learning-teaching.htm Adrian
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 1, 2004
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            Hi Graham,

            People might find some useful / interesting links here.

            http://www.teacherdevelopment.net/Books/webguides/learning-teaching.htm





            Adrian



            --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          • Graham S Hall
            Dear all, Just picking up one or two things from the Jack Richards Q/A which Kevin forwarded, with some quotes: About the possible knowledge bases of Second
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 3, 2004
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              Dear all,

              Just picking up one or two things from the Jack Richards Q/A which Kevin
              forwarded, with some quotes:

              About the possible knowledge bases of Second Language Teacher Education:'Do
              teachers need to know how to carry out research? If so, what kind of
              research?'

              From goals from a development perspective: 'Understanding how...'(x3); and
              'Reviewing...'

              'A constructive view of teaching involves teachers in making their own sense
              of their own classrooms and taking on the role of a reflective practitioner'
              (from Freeman).

              Again from the Freeman quoatation: 'from carrying out classroom research...'

              This all seems to imply a potential role for teachers as researchers
              (practitioner-researchers) within TD amongst all the other things we can do.
              A possible question is how can such as role be developed within often hectic
              professional lives by those who want to follow this kind of path within TD.
              Obviously there is Action Research etc, but can sustainable models be
              developed which neither fizzle out nor overburden teachers. Or is something
              this potentially 'formal' a difficult way to conceive of taking their TD
              forward?

              Thanks

              Graham


              -----Original Message-----
              From: Landry [mailto:lklandry2002@...]
              Sent: 02 November 2004 03:37
              To: TDSIG@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [TDSIG] http://www.professorjackrichards.com/questions.htm



              Question:
              How would you characterize current approaches to the preparation of language
              teachers?
              Dr Richards Responds:
              In the past, learning to teach English as a second language was a process of
              acquiring a body of knowledge and skills from an external source, i.e. from
              experts. It was a kind of top-down process based on modeling good practices,
              the practices themselves built around a standard or recognized teaching
              method. Becoming a language teacher meant acquiring a set of discrete skills
              - lesson planning, techniques for presenting and practicing new teaching
              points and for teaching the four skills. The approach that dominated
              graduate courses at this time consisted of a limited diet of theory courses,
              mainly confined to linguistics (syntax, morphology, semantics), phonetics,
              English grammar and sometimes literature, plus the study of methodology.

              In the last 10 years or so a sub-field of language teaching has emerged now
              known as second language teacher education (Roberts, 1998). This refers to
              the study of the theory and practice of teacher development for language
              teachers. In the last thirty years there has also developed a substantial
              industry devoted to providing language teachers with professional training
              and qualifications. The knowledge base of language teaching has also
              expanded substantially although there are still significant differences of
              opinion concerning what the essential knowledge base of language teaching
              consists of. Experts arrive at different answers to questions such as the
              following:

              Is language teaching a branch of applied linguistics or a branch of
              education?
              How much linguistics do teachers need to know and whose linguistic
              theories are most relevant?
              What are the essential subjects in a pre-service or in-service curriculum
              for language teachers?
              Do teachers need to know how to carry out research? If so, what kind of
              research?

              Due to this lack of consensus as to the theoretical basis for language
              teaching, the kind of professional preparation teachers may receive varies
              considerably from country to country or even from institution to institution
              within a country, as a comparison of MA TESOL degrees in Canada and the
              United States reveals.

              There has been a marked shift in our understanding of what we mean by
              teacher preparation. In the past the idea of teacher training dominated but
              beginning in the 1990s teacher development assumed a more central role
              (Richards 1998). Teacher training involves processes of the following kind:

              Understanding basic concepts and principles as a prerequisite for
              applying them to teaching
              Expanding one's repertoire of routines, skills and strategies
              Trying out new strategies in the classroom
              Monitoring oneself and getting feedback from others on one's practice

              Teacher development serves a longer-term goal and seeks to facilitate growth
              of the teacher's general understanding of teaching and of himself or herself
              as a teacher. It often involves examining different dimensions of one's own
              practice as a basis for reflective review, and can hence be seen as
              "bottom-up". The following are examples of goals from a development
              perspective:

              Understanding how the process of second language development occurs
              Understanding how teachers' roles change according to the kind of
              learners he or she is teaching
              Understanding the kinds of decision-making that occurs during lessons
              Reviewing one's own theories and principles of language teaching
              Developing an understanding of different styles of teaching
              Determining learners' perceptions of classroom activities
              Acquiring the skills of a mentor

              Comparing the two perspectives on teacher education Freeman observed
              (Freeman 1982, 21-22):

              Training deals with building specific teaching skills: how to sequence a
              lesson or how to teach a dialogue, for instance. Development, on the other
              hand, focuses on the individual teacher - on the process of reflection,
              examination, and change which can lead to doing a better job and to personal
              growth and professional growth. These two concepts assume different views of
              teaching and the teacher. Training assumes that teaching is a finite skill,
              one which can be acquired and mastered. The teacher then learns to teach in
              the same way s/he learned to tie shoes or to ride a bicycle. Development
              assumes that teaching is a constantly evolving process of growth and change.
              It is an expansion of skills and understanding, one in which the teacher is
              responsible for the process in much the same way students are for learning a
              language.

              Teacher development is not seen as a one-off thing but a continuous process.
              The teacher is engaged in exploring his or her own teaching through
              reflective teaching in a collaborative process together with learners and
              colleagues. Learning from examining one's own teaching, from carrying out
              classroom research, from creating teaching portfolios, from interacting with
              colleagues through critical friendships, mentoring and participating in
              teacher networks, are all regarded as ways in which teachers can acquire new
              skills and knowledge. This reflects the prevailing educational philosophy of
              constructivism which is currently popular in education including language
              teacher education: knowledge is actively constructed and not passively
              received. A constructive view of teaching involves teachers in making their
              own sense of their own classrooms and taking on the role of a reflective
              practitioner.




              home
              Copyright 2002-2004 Jack C. Richards


              Does anyone else know of any sites or online articles that may be of
              interest to this discussion group (and beyond)? If so, just let us know and
              I could either collate them as a useful links site or we use them as
              starting in points for sharing opinions.

              Thanks

              Graham



              K. Landry
              Senior English Lecturer

              Center for International Students and Scholars
              Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST)
              1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju, 500-712
              Republic of Korea

              office 062 970 2068
              fax 062 970 2099

              LKLANDRY2002@...
              Landry@...


              ---------------------------------
              Post your free ad now! Yahoo! Canada Personals


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




              Any views expressed on this list are of the person posting them. They are
              not necessarily views held or shared by IATEFL or the TDSIG.
              Yahoo! Groups Links








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