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Re: [Synoptic-L] Query on Q

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  • Chuck Jones
    Ron and Leonard, I think that we need to be careful and nuanced when we refer to Mt s Jewishness as a gospel. It is a subversive if not heretical tract
    Message 1 of 42 , Jun 23, 2006
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      Ron and Leonard,

      I think that we need to be careful and nuanced when we refer to Mt's "Jewishness" as a gospel. It is a subversive if not heretical tract against Judaism, made much more powerful by being written from an insider's (a Jewish) point of view.

      It begins with Herod, the Jewish king, as the new Pharoah trying to kill the baby. Pagan astrologers worship while Jerusalem scribes use their biblical knowledge to aid the murder plot. Jesus, the New Moses, has to escape *into* Egypt!

      Then the very first block of teaching, delivered on a Mount, has Jesus saying "you've have heard it said [in the Law--even in the Ten Commandments!]...but I say to you."

      Gentiles are noble and Jews the enemies of God throughout the book. And Mt's Great commision concludes with "go therefore and teach all nations (ta ethne--the Gentiles)."

      It is as if someone wrote a tract quoting the founding fathers and constitution, using traditional American patriotic and political language, etc., but as an apologetic for the rightness of Al Quada.

      All of this suggests the timing of Mt's book should be tied to a community situation in which the split between Jew and Xn is profound, maybe nearly complete. Mt makes the argument that the split happened because historial Israel missed the point (as they had always done). So I'm not sure we can argue an early date from Mt's "Jewishness."

      By the way, Lk makes the same point in a different way. Mk, however, does not seem to have a particular bone to pick with the Jews.

      Chuck

      Rev. Chuck Jones
      Atlanta, Georgia


      Leonard Maluf wrote:


      > I like the logic here. But let me show you what else it yields: In
      > both language and outlook, Mark is clearly aimed at a Gentile audience,
      > whereas Matthew has much stronger ties with Judaism. Christianity was born out
      > of Judaism, therefore it is very unlikely that Matthew made use of Mark.




      .




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    • Chuck Jones
      Ron and Leonard, I think that we need to be careful and nuanced when we refer to Mt s Jewishness as a gospel. It is a subversive if not heretical tract
      Message 42 of 42 , Jun 23, 2006
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        Ron and Leonard,

        I think that we need to be careful and nuanced when we refer to Mt's "Jewishness" as a gospel. It is a subversive if not heretical tract against Judaism, made much more powerful by being written from an insider's (a Jewish) point of view.

        It begins with Herod, the Jewish king, as the new Pharoah trying to kill the baby. Pagan astrologers worship while Jerusalem scribes use their biblical knowledge to aid the murder plot. Jesus, the New Moses, has to escape *into* Egypt!

        Then the very first block of teaching, delivered on a Mount, has Jesus saying "you've have heard it said [in the Law--even in the Ten Commandments!]...but I say to you."

        Gentiles are noble and Jews the enemies of God throughout the book. And Mt's Great commision concludes with "go therefore and teach all nations (ta ethne--the Gentiles)."

        It is as if someone wrote a tract quoting the founding fathers and constitution, using traditional American patriotic and political language, etc., but as an apologetic for the rightness of Al Quada.

        All of this suggests the timing of Mt's book should be tied to a community situation in which the split between Jew and Xn is profound, maybe nearly complete. Mt makes the argument that the split happened because historial Israel missed the point (as they had always done). So I'm not sure we can argue an early date from Mt's "Jewishness."

        By the way, Lk makes the same point in a different way. Mk, however, does not seem to have a particular bone to pick with the Jews.

        Chuck

        Rev. Chuck Jones
        Atlanta, Georgia


        Leonard Maluf wrote:


        > I like the logic here. But let me show you what else it yields: In
        > both language and outlook, Mark is clearly aimed at a Gentile audience,
        > whereas Matthew has much stronger ties with Judaism. Christianity was born out
        > of Judaism, therefore it is very unlikely that Matthew made use of Mark.




        .




        ---------------------------------
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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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