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RE: Mark Matson RE: [Synoptic-L] Mt vs. Lk - Genealogy

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  • Matson, Mark (Academic)
    Bob: Thanks for this. I wonder, though, if there isn t a difference between textual modifications or insertions (which, granted, some can be somewhat long ...
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 26, 2012
      Bob:

      Thanks for this. I wonder, though, if there isn't a difference between textual modifications or insertions (which, granted, some can be somewhat long ... e.g., pericopae adulterae in John) and a more significant editing or re-editing.

      While with oral tradition one can easily imagine such variations taking place on a regular basis, it is not as easy to see it with written texts. Perhaps I have been too influenced by Werner Kelber's "Oral and Written Gospel" which saw the act of writing a text as "fixing" it on a more solid basis.

      More importantly, can we point to ancient examples of such "re-editing" of substantial elements in other texts? or in biblical texts?

      On a side note, this basic scenario is one of the big problems I have had with Ray Brown's (and J. Louis Martyn) approach to John, in which the core story is expanded and adjusted at various points.

      mark
      Mark A. Matson
      Milligan College
      http://www.milligan.edu/administrative/mmatson/personal.htm
      ________________________________________
      Bob Schacht wrote:

      >What do you mean that "Matthew evolved over several
      >generations"? Do you mean it was edited and re-edited a number of times?

      yes

      >Or are you simply addressing textual issues?
      >
      >If the former, is there any evidence of various stages of composition?

      I am thinking here as a flollklorist. (see Crossan's summary in BOC).
      In general, the longer the period of time a text has been
      transmitted, the more likely that one or more of those transmitters
      has modified the text . Of course, at some point the text becomes
      standardized, and is considered sacrosanct. Look, for example, at the
      text of Shakespeare's plays in the early years.
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