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Crawford RE: [Synoptic-L] Re: Sources and languages

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  • Bob Schacht
    ... I think what you re reaching for, here, when you refer to hybrid, is what linguists call pidgins and creoles. If these existed only in oral form,
    Message 1 of 76 , Feb 24, 2012
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      At 02:19 PM 2/24/2012, Greg Crawford wrote:
      >Robert,
      >
      >
      >
      >This is exactly my point. There is little use in talking of "the" language
      >(singular) in such contexts. I have a Zimbabwean friend who speaks *two*
      >indigenous languages, (Xhosa and Zulu if I recall), but she says
      >English is the
      >common language of Africa because there are hundreds of indigenous languages.
      >Naturally the rules of one language will affect the other producing a hybrid
      >sometimes; but detection of such influences upon their English does
      >not mean the
      >speaker was actually speaking an indigenous language at the time.
      >The parallels
      >between this and the Synoptic situation are obvious.


      I think what you're reaching for, here, when you refer "to hybrid,"
      is what linguists call pidgins and creoles. If these existed only in
      oral form, finding the evidence for them might be difficult. But as
      Crossan implies, the place to look for them is in the marketplace.

      Bob Schacht
      Northern Arizona University

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • David Mealand
      Greg wrote ... Both R. T. France1 and Robert H. Stein2 come to the conclusion that Capernaum in the time of Jesus was a town or ?city? of around 10,000 people.
      Message 76 of 76 , Feb 29, 2012
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        Greg wrote
        -----------
        Both R. T. France1 and Robert H. Stein2 come to
        the conclusion that Capernaum in the time of
        Jesus was a town or ?city? of around 10,000
        people. They appear to base this conclusion on
        the evidence that the town had a detachment of
        Roman troops, a major customs post, and a
        residential royal official (?????????).
        ...Stein concludes that in the time of Jesus there
        was a ?major synagogue ...
        ----------

        I would suggest that before assenting to such a
        picture some attention should be paid to the sober
        and cautious account to be found in J.L.Reed,
        Archaeology and the Galilean Jesus, 2002 pp.139-169
        which looks at the evidence from both site and
        sources in considerable detail with plenty of references to
        other scholarly literature. Population 600-1500, mostly Jewish,
        any officials those of Antipas not Roman, Romans
        nearby later in Hadrian's time, in this period no overtly pagan
        artifacts, evidence of what was under the 3rd C CE (or later)
        synagogue far from clear. Well worth reading.

        I would add that none of this excludes a small building
        used as a synagogue and village centre at this period
        whether under the later much larger one or not.

        A generation ago there was antipathy towards seeing Graeco-Roman
        features in the NT, now there seems to be an equally mistaken
        reluctance to engage with the Aramaic Jewish features behind the
        Greek of the Synoptics.

        David M.




        ---------
        David Mealand, University of Edinburgh


        --
        The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in
        Scotland, with registration number SC005336.
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